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Webster Genealogy

Leeds, San Francisco, Southport, Connecticut
This is still a work in progress...

Edington Henry Webster


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Contact Beth Northrop
ejnorth123 AT juno.com

 

Edington was a favorite of Benjamin C. Webster.

 

He came to the US spent some time in Bridgeport and then went out west The last they heart from him he was in the Northwest (probably Oregon I'm not sure when Washington became a state.

Edington was born in 1885 some records say Armley, Leeds, the free BMD database says born Bramley, West Riding.

 

in 1891 Edington os in the census un Armley Age 6 St. Bartholomew parish.

Edington is in the 1901 Census Age 15 Bridlington, YKS Holy Trinity Parish

 

Some information on the Battle of Edington -- from Britanica.

 

A large Danish army came to East Anglia in the autumn of 865, apparently intent on conquest. By 871, when it first attacked Wessex, it had already captured York, been bought off by Mercia, and had taken possession of East Anglia. Many battles were fought in Wessex, including one that led to a Danishdefeat at Ashdown in 871. Alfred the Great, a son of Aethelwulf, succeeded to the throne in the course of the year and made peace; this gave him a respite until 876. Meanwhile the Danes drove out Burgred of Mercia, putting a puppet king in his place, and one of their divisions made a permanent settlement in Northumbria.

Alfred was able to force the Danes to leave Wessex in 877, and they settled northeastern Mercia; but a Viking attack in the winter of 878 came near to conquering Wessex. That it did not succeed is to be attributed to Alfred’s tenacity. He retired to the Somerset marshes, and in the spring he secretly assembled an army that routed the Danes at Edington. Their king, Guthrum, accepted Christianity and took his forces to East Anglia, where they settled.

The importance of Alfred’s victory cannot be exaggerated. It prevented the Danes from becoming masters of the whole of England. Wessex was never again in danger of falling under Danish control, and in the next century the Danish areas were reconquered from Wessex. Alfred’s capture of London in 886 and the resultant acceptance of him by all the English outside the Danish areas was a preliminary to this reconquest. That Wessex stood when the other kingdoms had fallen must be put down to Alfred’s courage and wisdom, to his defensive measures in reorganizing his army, to his building fortresses and ships, and to his diplomacy, which made the Welsh kings his allies. Renewed attacks by Viking hosts in 892–896, supported by the Danes resident in England, caused widespread damage but had no lasting success.