"Henry Whitney, b. at 25 Pearl St., New York, 23 Aug. 1812; was graduated at Yale College in 1830, and settled in New Haven, Conn., in 1837, where he continued to reside until his death, living for a year in "Maple Cottage", Trumbull Street, until the fine mansion which he built for himself on Whitney Avenue (now occupied by his son Stephen) was completed; married, 27 Jan. 1835, by Rev. Dr. Lyell, at the residence of her parents, 498 Broadway, N. Y., to Hannah Eugenia Lawrence, born in New York, 27 Jan. 1815, dau. of Isaac Lawrence and his wife Anna, dau. of Rev. Abraham Beach, D. D., minister of Trinity Church, New York. She died, 16 March 1844, in New Haven, and was buried in the New Haven Cemetery. He married (2d), 25 July 1850, at Norwich, Conn., Maria Lucy Fitch; and died in New Haven, 21 March 1856, and was buried in the New Haven Cemetery. . . . . She married (2d), 20 Nov. 1862, at New York, Nathan Adolphus Baldwin, of Milford, Conn., where they resided in June 1877. They have one child, Natalie Augusta Baldwin, born at Milford, 26 Dec. 1864."

"The History of the Old Town of Derby, Connecticut 1642-1880" by Samuel Orcut t and Ambrose Beardsley, M.D. 1880 p779 "Stephen..was a merchant in New York city..He died Fe b 16, 1860; buried in Greenwood, of which cemetery he was one of the original incorporators , and a director through his life. He went to New York when 18 or 20 years of age, having had only ordinary advantages at Derby, and engaged himself as clerk to the firm of Lawrence and Whitney, shippers, in which his brother Henry was a partner. By energy and business talent he soon acquired means to enter copartnership with John Currie, a Scotchman, in the wholesale grocery trade. He traded largely in wines, then in cotton, then engaged in ship-building and the shipping trade to nearly all parts of the world; then in canals and railroads, and finally in banks, accumulating great wealth."

He set himself in business as a liquor retailer and later wholesaler in 1805 at Nr 4 Stone Street, New York. Stephen Whitney's fortune grew heavily thanks to some large and fortunate speculations in cotton. In the 1830's he was among New York's richest men. His fortune was doubled by shrewd investments in city real estate. Second in wealth to John Jacob Astor, Whitney's fortune was estimated between 5-10'000'000 dollars at its height.

FROM

 
Webster Family Genealogy    Yorkshire Roots; Inventors and More...
  
 


   
   
   
 

 

 

 

Contact Beth Northrop
ejnorth123 AT juno.com


 
Horton

 

 

GREAT HORTON

ALL ABOUT BRADFORD

Pictures, Facts, Storys, History and trivia  

GREAT HORTON WAS ONCE A TRULY SEPARATE COMMUNITY 

 

 
HISTORY.
 
The township of Horton is very much like its neighbour Bowling and is made up of two districts Little Horton and Great Horton. It is south west of the city centre.
 
The Doomsday book says that Horton is dependent on the manor of Bradford. In 1100  Robert de Stapleton had it. Then his son Hugh  who at the time had Clayton assumed the name of Horton. after  Robert de lacy gave him land to manage.
 
 The Horton family held it until 1272. Then it past though various  families. until it was bought back by Joshua Horton in 1640.
 
 In 1858 the manor was sold to William Cousen .
 
 Horton was a place of small farmsteads, cloth manufactures and coal mines. It had an old corn mill as early as 1311.
 
It is strange to think that in 1800 Horton was quite separate from Bradford.
 
Horton joined Bradford corporation in 1847.
 
 
 
Photo Phil Robinson 2009 
The Blamiresa large well respected family owned many propetys in
G.Horton
 Many of the family were Butchers by trade. And Samuel Blamires  owned the Kings arms.
Built by Gilbert Brooksbank, another large GH family in the 1730s.
 
 
 
Kings Arms.
Photo Phil Robinson 2009

 

Great Horton Today 

Today Great Horton is not so Great its a shadow of its former self.

It has been sucked up into the hustle and bustle of the city.

 It now dominated by a large Tesco  store that some say has helped  suck the life out of local businesses.

It has a never ending stream of traffic. People pass though without an idea or care of its Historical past.

 

 Photo Phil Robinson 2009

 

 Photo Phil Robinson 2009

 GREAT HORTONS FIRST WORKING MENS CLUB OPEND IN 1886
IT IS LOCALLY KNOWN AS THE "FAT POT"
 
 
THE FAMOUS HUNT YARD  DEVELOPMENT
LAND GIVEN TO JOHN NORTHROP FOR KILLING THE WILD BOAR
 Photo Phil Robinson 2009
 
Click the link to go to my site on the legend of the boar

 

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