897855 A Branch of Connecticut Northrops 1619 to Present


Northrops


Family Tree
 
Before the founder England
 Joseph Northrup            
1619(1639)-1669 Milford
 Joseph Northrup             narrrow
1649 Milford ~ ???1700
 James Northrop              
1693 Milford ~ 1747
 James Northrop
             
1719 Ridgefield ~ 1784
 Amos Northrop              
1778? Milford 1855 Warren
 Alvin Northrop                
1803 Ridgefield, Kent, Milford, Salem ~1875 or 86
 George Elmore  Northrop
1844 Cornwall~1906 Southport
 George Ives  Northrop     
1871 Southport ~ 1923 Southport
 Alvin Jennings  Northrop  
1905 Southport/Norwalk ~ 1980 Fairfield

Hannigan

Ives

Jennings

Keeler

Webster (offsite)

This is a work in process and there are still other possible fathers for Amos.

Other Amos Father Possibilities arrow

 

Amos Northrop b ~ 1779-80 (census dates)

Some of the epitaphs are in the form of admonition to the living to reform their ways that they may die in peace - the Rev. Joseph Bellamy's stone.

Beneath the roots of tangled weeds,
Afar in country graveyards lie,
The men whose unrecorded deeds,
Have stamped this nation's destiny

Stony Creek Boarding house Hotel -- "Point House" of Northrop's 1860s

Milford 1729 new preacher was an old light and opposed to half-way covenant previous minister had been accepting of the new light -- halfway covenant (not requiring a religious conversion experience) after 1737 with the pastorate of rev whittlesey, a number were unhappy. Failing in an attemt to remove him, some dissented and declared for the Presbyterian cuhrch of scotland

appearing
not pleased with it and putting it aside."
Failing in every attempt to obtain relief, they availed themselves
of their right to dissent from the church constitution and to "declare
for the excellent establishment of the Church of Scotland," or to avow
themselves to be Presbyterians and to incorporate as such under the
laws of the colony. To this end the following persons agreed to
apply to the "next county court and there perform what the act required:"
Seth Plumb, Peleg Baldwin. Jesse Smith, Samuel Merchant,
Samuel Hines, Gyles Oviatt, Deliverance Downs, Jonathan Fowler,
Samuel Hine, Daniel Collins, Joseph Prichard, Joseph Northrup, John
Baldwin, Josiah Hine, Joel Baldwin, Andrew Santford, Jr., Samuel
Bristol, Jesse Lambert, Samuel Santford, Jr., Daniel Downs, Lewis
Mallett, John Oviatt, James Smith, Samuel Eells, Nathaniel Buckingham,
Samuel Oviatt, Jr., William Fenn, Andrew Santford, George
Clark, Benjamin Fenn, Jeremiah Peck, Joseph Smith, Bartholomew
Sears, Thomas Welch, William Sewall Sears, Joseph Fenn, Jr., John
Downs, Nathaniel Eells, Samuel Eells, Jr., John Smith, Joseph Howman,
Lemuel Smith, Josiah Tibbals, Samuel Oviatt, Samuel Hine, Jr., Horace
Peck.
These were all members of the First church, and as such declared
their "sober dissent." Twelve others soon joined them, and their
cause gained sympathy every day. The matter coming before the
court, in January, 1741. that body put it off until the April term, and
then still further postponed action, advising them " not to prosecute
their dissent," thinking that the feeling created in Milford that year
by Reverend Mr. Tennant's preaching might indicate a way of relief.
But this hope not being realized, the plea before the court was continued
in November, 1741. To their great surprise, the judges would
not admit their dissent, dismissing it on a technicality. A new memorial,
couched in the language of the statute, was now presented,
proclaiming their "dissent," without expressing "assent" to any form
of church government, which was placed on file. They also agreed,
November 30th, 1741, to set up a separate assembly, if thirty families
would unite for that purpose. These were secured, and in January,
1742, they qualified themselves according to the " English act of Toleration,"
as Separatists from the church established by the laws of the
colony.

But in the meantime the decided opposition of the First church
was awakened, and a series of petty persecutions followed. The
ministers at their public meetings were cited to appear before the
magistrates as disorderly transient persons. In this way Benajah 256 HISTORY OF NEW HAVEN COUNTY.
Case, A.M., of Simsbury, was brought before Governor Jonathan Law,
January 17th, 1742, charged with preaching to the "sober dissenters."
After two days trial, in which the governor made many apparent prejudicial
rulings against Mr. Case, he was adjudged guilty and sentenced
to pay in all 41 shillings and 4 pence. Mr. Case refused to do
this, when he was taken to the New Haven jail until the sentence
should be satisfied.
But the congregation was not discouraged, and in June, 1742, decided
to build a meeting house, asking the consent of the town to set
it on public land. This privilege being refused, a lot was purchased
of Bartholomew Sears, east of the old meeting house and on the opposite
side of the river, the county court granting the necessary liberty
November 9th, 1742. The first sermon in it was preached by
Reverend John Eells, in April, 1743. The house was very plain and
had no steeple until 1799, when one was built by subscription, Stephen
Treat, Esq., donating the bell for the same. The house was
used until 1833, when a part of the present edifice took its place.
Complaint having been made of Mr. Eell's preaching, the constable
searched for him, "but he could not be found." Mr. Kent, who was
the second person to preach in this house, was also complained of,
" but could not be apprehended."
In April. 1743, the church placed itself under the care of the Presbytery
of New Brunswick, and in June that year Reverend Richard
Treat, of that body, came and preached so acceptably that his settlement
as a minister was most earnestly desired. But his charge in
New Jersey would not consent to his leaving them. Meantime, Mr.
Whittlesey and his "Old Light" adherents had not become more tolerant.
But so strongly were they opposed to those holding " New
Light" views that, up to 1743, he had refused the use of his pulpit to
five ministers in good standing, but who differed with him on the
points which were then engaging the attention of the people in so
earnest a manner. Hence, to appease the popular desire to hear them,
on one occasion one of these visiting brethren preached from the doorstep
of the meeting house to more than a thousand people.
In 1743 the persecution reached its climax. In August of that
year Reverend Samuel Finlay, president of Princeton College, by the
approval of the New Brunswick Presbytery, preached twice for the
dissenters; but he was apprehended for disorderly conduct, prosecuted,
condemned and ordered by Governor Law to "be transported
as a vagrant from town to town by the constable of each town." This
outrageous sentence reacted upon the opposition, and greater liberty
was accorded in the course of a few years.
In May, 1750, the general assembly released the dissenters from
paying taxes to the First society, and gave them certain parish privileges.
In 1760 they became an ecclesiastical society of the established
church, holding their first regular meetings as the Second
HISTORY OF NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 257
Society in Milford, October 27th, 1760. Thus the society and church
were designated until May, 1S59, when the general assembly authorized
the name to be changed to the Plymouth Society of Milford, by
which title it and the church have since been known.
In 1870 the meeting house, built in 1833, was enlarged by an addition
to the rear end, the organ loft was changed and a new organ supplied.
About $7,000 was thus expended. In 1889 repairs and
improvements to the amount of $3,000 were made, and the building
is now in a fine condition, and the society is said to be prosperous.
The parish contains 145 families, and the church has 250 members.
The Sabbath school has about 200 members.

The Plymouth Church, or as it was long known, the Second
Congregational Church of Milford, was formed mainly of dissenters
from the First church. In 1737, near the close of the tninistry of
Reverend Samuel Andrew, a colleague pastor was called, in the person
of Reverend Samuel Whittlesey, of Wallingford.

 

Topstone Train Station, also referred to as Sanford Station.Redding, CT

 

The Second Congregational Church in Milford, called Plymouth Church was organized in 1741. The following are all the marriages recorded before 1800.

Gideon Munson Northrop was the son of Gideon and Esther (Munson) Northrop, the former of whom born in Amity Parish, November 1, 1753, died June 18, 1842, aged eighty-nine years; they were the parents of the following children: Eben, Isaac, Daniel. Merritt, Gideon Munson, mentioned above; Jesse,

David, Anna, Lucy, Hannah, Esther, Rebecca, Medad, Abner. The revolutionary record of Gideon Northrop is as follows: He enlisted the first part of May, 1775, as ensign under Osborne, in the parish of Amity, near Woodbridge, New Haven, Connecticut; served eight months. He enlisted, second, January 1, 1776, for one year under Captain Tuttle. He served consecutively under Lieutenant Cat- lin, Sergeant Orton, Sergeant Garnet, Colonel Charles Webb, of Pennsylvania, until the evacuation of Boston; thence to New LonSamuel don, and from there by ship to New York. He retired from New York with his troops, but was ill and returned to Hackensack, New Jersey. When recovered he rejoined his command, and was in the battle of White Plains, and also, was employed in various services along the Hudson, until the expiration of his term, January 1, 1777.

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1784
HEAD OF MEADOW

Dec., 1784, voted, "that ye boundaries and limits hereinafter described shall be a district for schoojing by themselves known by name of Head of Meadow district, viz: Beginning at a place called the causeway, thence running south so far as the top of the Mine hill, from thence eastward to the parting of the paths near Mr. William Northrop's house from thence northeast to the Crooked brook and from thence north to the place begun at. Petitioners for the above described district are Samuel (illicit, Gideon Northrop, David Shepherd, John Gillett, Nehemiah Birtch, George Shepard, Amos Shepard, Moses Gillett, George Northrop, Abraham Gillett."

1767 Deep Brook School Gideon Northrop

1794 Gideon and Joseph Northrop are among the incorporators of Plymouth

1840 census Gideon in Pennsgrove, Warren County (western pa) PA

 

Colebrook, Ct

IVES Rhoda, d. Joseph, b. Oct. 14, 1781

BLAKESLEE
BLAKSSLEE
BLAKSLEE Asenath, d. Samuel & Phebe, b. June 4, 1785   Federal, s. Samuel & Phebe, b. Jan. 25, 1792   Gad, s. Samuel & Phebe, b. June 13, 1794   Joel, s. Samuel & Phebe, b. Aug. 13, 1787   Lois Ives, d. Samuel & Phebe, b. Oct. 13, 1796   Lois Ives, d. Samuel & Phebe, d. Mar. 21, 1797   Phebe, d. Samuel & Phebe, b. Oct. 30, 1789   Samuel, 2nd, s. Samuel & Phebe, b. Nov. 17, 1783

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Goshen, ct ALLYN (also see ALLEN)

Austin, m Hannah Elizabeth IVES, Nov 16, 1847, at the house of Cephas IVES, by Rev Lavalette Perrin

Goshen

BAKER


Albert, m Caroline IVES, b of Goshen, Jan 1, 1839, by Rev Grant Powers

baldwin Nathaniell Jr, m Hannah IVES, Mar 23, 1752

baldwin Rachel, m Benjamin IVES, Dec 6, 1753

beach, beech Chloe, m Lazarus IVES, Oct 29, 1772

Beach, Beech John 2d, m Lois IVES, Mar 12, 1755

Beach, Beech Mencis*, m Aseneth IVES, May 23, 1776 (*"Mineas" in Hist. of Goshen)

Goshen --

ALVORD

Catharine, m Chauncey BEECH, Dec 24, 1772
Chauncey, of Middletown, m Harriet LOBDILL of Goshen, Aug 1, 1827, by Rev E Washburn
John, m Phebe BROWN, b of Goshen, Jan 4, 1832, by Rev Luther Mead

Norfolk, CT

daughter of Titus5 IVES (John4, John3,JOHN2, WILLIAM1) was born Feb 17, 1731/32 in Wallingford, CT, and died Sep 1810 in Norfolk, CT. He married Dorothy Halsey Sep 17, 1754 in Wallingford, CT

  • Rachel IVES, born Abt. 1762. She married Francis Beach Mar 1779 in Norfolk, CT.
Father: Benjamin Ives

Marriage 1 Francis Beach b: 13 Oct 1755
  • Married: 28 Apr 1779

She may have been aunt to Rachel. Could this be the source of the name Francis??

Could this be Rachel's namesake??

many ives, bristol

two younger rachels

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Children of Gamaliel and Elizabeth (Blakeslee) Parker, born at Wallingford:
    i. Abel Parker, b. 4 Jan 1741, m. at Wallingford 23 Aug 1762 Lydia Parker (b. 8 Mar 1744/5 at Wallingford, dau. of Ebenezer & Lydia (Barnes) Parker), removed to Washington, CT, and Greenfield, VT;

 

 

barbour Goshen

NORTHROP
Anna, of Goshen, m John LATHROP of New Milford, Oct 28, 1839, by D Osborn
Mary, m Alanson D APLEY, b of Goshen, Jan 1, 1838, by Rev Asahel Gaylord

goshen

IVES
Aseneth, m Mencis* BEECH, May 23, 1776 (*"Mineas" in Hist. of Goshen)
Benjamin, m Rachel BALDWIN, Dec 6, 1753
Benjamin, his son ______, b Aug 17, 1754; died Sept 6, 1754
Caroline, m Albert BAKER, b of Goshen, Jan 1, 1829, by Rev Grant Powers
David, m Eunice GILLETT, Mar 25, 1761
Edwin, m Cornelia A WARREN, May 20, 1847, by Rev William H Moore
Elizabeth, dau Benjamin, b Nov 28, 1755
Esther, dau Lazarus, b Oct 10, 1774
Esther, of Goshen, m Norman SPUR of Sheffield, Mass., Aug 23, 1841, by Rev Thomas Kile
Hannah, m Nathaniell BALDWIN Jr, Mar 23, 1752
Hannah Elizabeth, m Austin ALLYN, Nov 16, 1847, at the house of Cephas IVES, by Rev Lavalette Perrin
Jesse, son David, b June 7, 1762; died Dec 11 following
Jesse, son Lazarus, b June 21, 1776
Lazarus, m Cloe BEECH, Oct 29, 1772
Lazarus, his son_______, died June 6, 1818, age 34 ("He was crowned and body found by Rufus IVES")
Leverett, m Huldah HOLBROOK, Nov 26, 1822, by Rev Joseph Harvey
Levi, son Benjamin, died(?) Nov 11, 1753
Levi, m Caroline PRATT, Nov 3, 1784
Lois, m John BEECH 2nd, Mar 12, 1755
Mary Ann, m William LYMAN, b of Goshen, Mar 19, 1834, by Rev Grant Powers
Mineas, his child, died Jan 16, 1817, age 6
Ruth, m Martin WILLCOX, Mar 2, 1758
Ruth, dau David, b Mar 19, 1764
Sabin, m Allice LANDON, b of Goshen, Mar 4, 1854, by Rev Daniel W Loundsbury
Sarah, of Goshen, m Amos JOHNSON of Cornwall, Oct 12, 1826, by Rev Walter Smith of Cornwall
Silas, son Lazarus, b July 15, 1768

Kent, CT

HUNTER
Reuben, m. Rachal IVES, Dec. 25, 1826, by John Mills, J.P.

 

IVES
Lois A., m. Harvey BEECHER, Feb. 19, 1840, by Rev. William W. Andrews
Rachal, m. Reuben HUNTER, Dec. 25, 1826, by John Mills, J.P.

NORTHROP
Agur Curtis, s. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. May 8, 1812
Agur Curtiss, m. Lucy Marsh SWIFT, b. of Kent, Jan. 22, 1839, by Rev. Henry B. Sherman, of New Preston
Alvin, m. Sally ATWOOD, July 2, 1826, by Rev. L.P. Hickox
Amos, m. Susan CHOCUM, Oct. 26, 1829, by John Mills, J.P.
Ann Aurilla, m. Joel B. PRATT, Oct. 3, 1827, by Rev. L.P. Hickox
Aurelia, d. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. Oct. 11, 1806
David, Jr., of Sherman, m. Adaline FULLER, of Kent, Oct. 9, 1820, by Rev. Asa Blair
Maryann, m. John HINCKLEY, June 24, 1832, by Lewis Mills, J.P.
Thomas Wells, s. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. May 25, 1808

ELMER
Abiel, of Torringford, m. Anne M. ST. JOHN, of Kent, June 29, 1822, by Rev. Asa Blair

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sharon

ELMER

  • Ambrose Churchill, son Daniel & Ruth, b Oct 29, 1771
  • Betty, dau David & Jemima, b Sept 22, 1749
  • Bille, son Daniell & Ruth, b Apr 9, 1765
  • Daniel, son Daniell & Ruth, b Mar 24, 1759
  • David, m Jemima CURTICE, Oct 20, 1748, by John Williams
  • Jesse, son Samuel & Sylvia, b June 26, 1767
  • Joel, son Daniell & Ruth, b Aug 11, 1761
  • John, son Samuel & Sylvia, b Aug 3, 1765
  • Martine, son Samuel & Sylvia, b Jan 16, 1764
  • Mary, dau Samuel & Sylvia, b Apr 24, 1754
  • Mehitabel, dau Samuel & Mary, b Jan 14, 1756
  • Rebecca, dau Daniel & Ruth, b Sept 5, 1767
  • Samuel, son Samuel & Mary, b Aug 7, 1752
  • Simeon, son Daniell & Ruth, b Sept 15, 1763
  • Simeon, son Daniel & Ruth, b Sept 27, 1769

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danbury

IVES

  • George White, son Isaac & Jerusha, b Feb 28, 1798
  • Isaac, m Jerusha BENEDICT, dau Zadock, Mar 14, 1792
  • Jerusha Russel, dau Isaac & Jerusha, b May 18, 1793

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middletown

IVES

  • Abigail, of Wallingford, m Joseph HIGBE of Middletown, Aug 20, 1758
  • Charles H, m Susanna M TURNER of Middletown, Oct 17, 1831, by Rev Fitch Reed
  • Eliza, of Mereden, m Ira H RICHMOND of Suthbury, Nov 21, 1827, by Rev John R Crane
  • Elizabeth Ann, of New Haven, m Ephraim TUTTLE of Middletown, July 3, 1834, by Rev B Creagh
  • Eunice M, m Henry SMITH of Middletown, Apr 24, 1823, by Rev Eli Ball
  • Eunice Matilda, dau Noel & Eunice, b Aug 14, 1806
  • Frances M, m William O'HARA of Middletown, July 3, 1825, by Joshua L Williams, V.D.M.
  • Henry, son Noel & Eunice, b Jan 31, 1815
  • Isabel, of Wallingford, m Recompense MILLER of Middletown, Feb 16, 1757
  • Joseph G, m Emma Jane COOLEY, Nov 29, 1837, by Rev Elisha Andrews
  • Joesph Gilber, son Noel & Eunice, b Apr 10, 1812
  • Julius N, m Mary Ann TRYON of Middletown, Sept 17, 1828, by Rev H Bangs
  • Julius Noel, son Noel & Eunice, b Oct 30, 1801
  • Lucretia, of Middletown, m Philo DAVID of Munro, Sept 27, 1840, by Rev Stephen Hayes, of Middlefield
  • Martha, of Wallingford, m Daniel HIGBE of Middletown, Feb __, 1766
  • Mary, dau Noel & Eunice, b Dec 13, 1808
  • Mary, of Middletown, m Alfred GROSWOLD of Saybrook, May 7, 1726, by Levi Knight
  • Noel, m Eunice MILLER, Dec 31, 1800
  • Ransom Jr, m Eunice F BEACHER of Middletown, Nov 21, 1830, by Rev John Cookson
  • Sherman, son Noel & Eunice, b Feb 11, 1804
  • Sherman, of Middletown, m Eunice BARNES of New Hartford, Mar 15, 1826, by Rev E Washburn
  • Tenta, of New Haven, m John SMITH of Middletown, July 6, 1834, by Rev B Creagh

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sherman

NORTHROP
Betsey Parthenia, dau Sarah LOOMIS, b Feb 9, 1807
Charles, m Emmeline HOYT, Dec 30, 1838, by Rev Maltby Gelston
Daniel W, Dr., m Jane GELSTON, Sept 18, 1827, by Maltby Gelston
Eliza C, of Sherman, m Charles DAVIS of South East, Oct 25, 1846, by Rev J B Stoddard
Eunice E, m John C PECK, b of New Fairfield, June 9, 1841, by Rev Daivd C Perry
Ezra G, m Prudence SHERWOLD, May 17, 1821, by M Gelston
Jane A, of Sherman, m Morgan HORTON of South East, N.Y., Dec 19, 1848, by Rev J B Stoddard
Jane A., see also Jane A HORTON
John Odell, m Charlotte GIDDINGS, Sept 2, 1829, by Maltby Gelston
Martha A, of Sherman, m Rev. Moses BLYDENBROUGH of the New York Annual Conference of the M.E. Church, May 24, 1842, by Z Davenport
Martha Lucretia, dau Stamford, died Aug 2, 1847, age 1 5/12 (sic)
Paulina, m James N PAGE, Apr 27, 1834, by Rev Maltby Gelston
Sally, m Morgan SEELEY, Dec 8, 1841, by N M Urmston
Samuel W, m Ann GOTHAM, Dec 28, 1820, by Maltby Gelston. Int.pub.

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stratford

IVES, IVERS
Elizabeth, dau Thomas & Mary, b May 19, 1756
George W., of New York, m Frances S SMITH of Stratford, Dec 20, 1848, by Rev Joseph Scott
Hannah, dau Thomas & Hannah, b Jan 26, 1747/48
Hezekiah Beach, dau(sic) Thomas & Hannah, b July 18, 1749
Mary, dau Thomas & Mary, b Oct 5, 1753

-------------------------

wallingford

IVES, EIUES, IEVES, IUE, IUES, [see also IVY]

Aaron, son Abijah & Abigail, b. May 6, 1736
Aaron, son Abijah, d. Nov. 24, 1742
Aaron, son Abijah & Abigail, b. Apr. 16, 1746
Aaron, m. Esther HALL, Dec. 27, 1779
Abel, son Nathaniel & Mary, b. May 6, 1711
Abel, m. Sarah READ, Mar. 25, 1736, by Mr. Whitel
Abel, son Abel & Sarah, b. Dec. 9, 1736
Abel, Jr., m. Lois TUTTLE, June 19, 1760
Abel, son John, 3rd & Sarah, b. Jan. 25, 1772
Abel, son John, 3rd & Sarah, d. Nov. 30, 1776
Abia, dau. Daniel & Abia, b. July last, 1736
Abiah, m. James HUMMERSTON, Feb. 4, 1756
Abiah, w. Daniel, d. Sept 21, 1767
Abiah, m. David DIBBELL, Dec. 6, 1792
Abigail, dau. Joseph & Easter, b. Aug. 27, 1704
Abigail, dau. Elnathan & Abigail, b. Feb. 9, 1733
Abigail, dau. Abijah & Abigail, b. Feb. 14, 1738
Abigail, dau. Jotham & Abigail, b. Oct. 10, 1739
Abigail, w. Abijah, d. May 6, 1753
Abigail, dau. Nathaniel & Zurviah, b. Oct 17, 1758
Abigail, m. Amos DOOLITTLE, Apr. 4, 1760
Abigail, dau. Timothy & Abigail, b. July 24, 1777
Abijah, son John & Mary, b. Mar. 14, 1700
Abijah, m. Abigail MIX, May last, 1730, by Capt Yale
Abijah, son Abijah & Abigail, b. Mar. 5, 1734
Abijah, son Abijah & Abigail, b. Mar. 24, 1734
Abijah, Jr., d. Aug. 16, 1761
Abijah, d. July 17, 1762
Abijah, son Abraham & Luce, b. Nov. 1, 1762
Abijah, m. Hannah JOHNSON, b. of Wallingford, May 20, 1779, by Oliver Stanley, J. P.
Abijah, m. Hannah JOHNSON, May 20, 1779
Abijah, son Aaron & Esther, b. Sept 1, 1781
Abijah, son Abijah & Hannah, b. May 17, 1799
Abijah, m. Lowly IVES, b. of Wallingford, July 15, 1827, by Samuel Miller
Abner, twin with Jotham, son Jotham & Abigail, b. Aug. 20, 1845
Abraham, m. Elisabeth STANDLY, Feb. 13, 1734, by Mr. Whittelsey
Abraham, m. Barbary JOHNSON, May 11, 1736, by Mr. Hall
Abraham, son Abraham & Barbary, b. June 8, 1743
Abraham, son Abraham & Barberry, d. June 22, 1743
Abraham, son Abraham & Barbary, d. June 26, 1743
Abraham, son Abraham & Barbary, b. Mar. 8, 1745/6
Abraham, son Nathaniel & Mehitable, b. Nov. 20, 1746
Abraham, m. Luce DAYTON, Oct 14, 1761
Abraham, Jr., m. Eunice HULLS, Jan. 15, 1767
Abraham, Jr., son Abraham & Barbary, d. July 29, 1776, in the Army
Abraham, m. wid. Sabra WAINWRIT, Jan. 8, 1778
Abram, son John & Mary, b. Dec. 2, 1709
Adelia, dau. Levi & Asenath, b. Jan. 31, 1832
Ado (Aro?), son Ransom & Sarah, b. July 31, 1824
Albert, son Butler & Olive, b. Sept 26, 1810
Alethia, of Wallingford, m. Huron MORSE, of Ohio, Apr. 21, 1833, by Rev. Simon Shayler
Alma, dau. Samuel & Lowly, b. Jan. 16, 1782
Altamira, dau. Abijah & Hannah, b. Nov. 13, 1789
Ama, dau. Daniel, Jr. & Obedience, b. Feb. 18, 1777
Amanda, dau. Charles, Jr. & Mary, b. July 28, 1786
Amasa, son Gideon & Mary, b. Aug. 24, 1712
Amasa, son Gideon & Mary, d. Sept 1, 1715
Amasa, son Gedean & Mary, b. Nov. 15, 1718
Amasa, son Enson Gideon, d. Sept 20, 1742
Amasa, son Jotham & Abigail, b. Feb. 7, 1742/3
Amasa, son Stephen & Sarah, b. Nov. 10, 1747
Amasa, son Gideon & Eunice, b. Apr. 15, 1748
Amasa, Jr., m. Hulda SHAILER, Dec. 19, 1771
Amasa, m. Rebeccah WARD, Dec. 13, 1782
Ambros, son Abraham & Barbary, b. June 30, 1748
Ambrose, son Abraham & Barbary, d. Sept 4, 1776, in the Army
Ambrose, son Amos & Lucy, b. Mar. 16, 1778
Ambrose, son Abijah & Hannah, b. Dec. 31, 1786
Amelia, of North Haven, m. Elam POTTER, of Northford, June 20, 1824, by James Noyes
Amos, son Caleb & Elisabeth, b. Aug. 1, 1750
Amos, son Gideon & Eunice, b. Dec. 25, 1751
Amos, m. Rebecca COLLINS, May 14, 1777
Amos, son John, 3rd & Sarah, b. Jan. 21, 1778
Amos, son Ransom & Sarah, b. June 15, 1812
Amos Harrison, son Zachariah & Lois, b. Nov. 14, 1771
Amarilla, dau. Butler & Olive, b. June 19, 1808
Andrew, son Thomas & Rebecca, b. July 2, 1724
Andrew, m. Sarah PRINDLE, Oct 2, 1744
Anna, dau. John & Hannah, b. Apr. 20, 1725
Anna, m. Noah YALE, Aug. 2, 1744
Annah, dau. Abijah & Abigail, b. Feb. 21, 1749/50
Annah, dau. Joseph & Mary, b. Dec. 7, 1750
Annah, dau. Abijah & Abigail, d. June 25, 1751
Anna, dau. John & Mary, b. Sept 21, 1773
Annah, dau. Timothy & Abigail, b. Sept 2, 1791
Anna, m. Noah FOSTER, Feb. 22, 1793
Anne, dau. Abel & Sarah, d. Dec. 16, 1739
Anne, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. [d.?] Dec. 20, 1739
Anne, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. Aug. 1, 1740
Anne, dau. Enos & Anne, b. Apr. 25, 1757
Anor, son Joseph & Mamry, b. Jan. 13, 1740
Anson, son Amos & Lucy, b. Mar. 19, 1785
Asa, son Nathaniel & Mahittabel, b. Apr. 8, 1756
Asael, son Joseph & Mamre, b. June 18, 1741
Asahel, son Stephen & Sarah, b. May 12, 1749
Asenath, dau. Nathaniel, Jr. & Repentance, b. Dec. 31, 1773
Asenath, dau. Levi & Asenath, b. Dec. 1, 1820
Aurelia m. Ambrose C. BARTHOLOMEW, Sept. 12, 1832, by James Noyes
Barbary, dau. Abraham & Barbary, b. Oct. 9, 1738
Barbary, dau. Abraham & Barbary, d. Oct 5, 1748
Barbary, dau. Abraham & Lucy, b. Aug. 29, 17[__]
Barbary, dau. Abraham & Lucy, d. Oct 19, [___]
Becca, dau. John, Jr. & Lois, b. Aug. 27, 1770
Becca, see also Rebecca
Benajah, son Titus & Martha, b. Feb. 2, 1772
Benajah, son Titus & Martha, d. Oct 25, 1776
Benjamin, son John & Mary, b. Nov. 22, 1697
Benjamine, m. Rebecca MERRIAM, Jan. 17, 1723, by Capt. Hall
Benjamine, son Benjamin & Rebecca, b. Apr. 15, 1727
Benjamin, son Benjamin & Rebecka, d. June 12, 1727
Benjamin, m. Hannah MOSS, May 6, 1728, by Capt Hall
Benjamine, son Benjamin & Hannah, b. Jan. 26, 1729
Betsey, dau. Samuel & Lowly, b. Mar. 19, 1780
Betsey, dau. Charles, Jr. & Mary, b. Apr. 28, 1784
Barzeleal, son John & Mary, b. July 4, 1712
Bezaliel, son John & Mary, d. Oct 28, 1714
Bezaleel, son Samuell & Phebe, b. Dec. 14, 1726
Bezaliel, m. Hannah MERRIAM, Feb. 14, 1751
Butler, son Charles & Sarah, b. May 3, 1762
Butler, son Charles & Sarah, d. Aug. 15, 1779, a prisoner, in New York
Butler, son Joel, Jr. & Olive, b. Feb. 16, 1782
Butler, son Joel, Jr. & Olive, d. Apr. 1, 1782
Butler, son Joel & Olive, b. Apr. 16, 1783
Butler, m. Olive Hall MOSS, Dec. 3, 1807
Butler, son Ransom & Sarah, b. Sept 20, 1818
Caleb, son Nathaniell & Mary, b. Feb. 3, 1700
Caleb, m. Elizabeth PLUM, Feb. 27, 1733
Caleb, son Caleb & Elisabeth, b. May 19, 1745
Caleb, son Caleb & Elisabeth, b. May 19, 1745
Caleb, son Caleb & Elizabeth, b. Mar. 9, 1747/8
Caleb, son Caleb & Elisabeth, b. Feb. 9, 1748
Caleb, d. Apr. 13, 1752
Caleb, m. Ruth RIGHT, Feb. 4, 1771
Caleb, son Charles & Sarah, b. Jan. 1, 1774
Caleb, m. Mary TUTTLE, b. of Wallingford, Nov. 9, 1824 by Rev. Oliver Willson, of North Haven
Caroline, dau. Gideon & Charlotte, b. July 28, 1818
Charles, son Caleb & Elisabeth, b. Sept 5, 1734
Charles, m. Sarah BUTLER, May 2, 1755
Charles, son Charles & Sarah, b. Apr. 14, 1760
Charles, Jr., m. Mary FRANCIS, Dec. 19, 1783
Charles, d. June 16, 1790
Charles, son Charles & Mary, b. Dec. 14, 1790
Charles, son Charles & Mary, d. May 8, 1793
Charles, son Ransom & Sally, b. Mar. 25, 1802
Charles, son Elihu & Rachael, b. Aug. 6, 1817
Charles, m. Lois HULL, b. of Wallingford, Feb. 25, 1823, by Samuel Miller
Charles, of Wallingford, m. Sarah L. MORSE, of Cheshire, Oct 26, 1837, by Rev. Simon Shailer
Charlotte, dau. Ichabad & Mary, b. Nov. 1, 1797
Charlotte, dau. Gideon & Charlotte, b. Sept. 5, 1820
Charlotte, m. Andrew ANDREWS, b. of Wallingford, Apr. 15, 1834, by Rev. Simon Shayler
Chauncey, son Jotham & Abigail, b. Nov. 20, 1748
Chauncey, son Titus & Martha, b. Apr. 9, 1776
Chauncey, son Zachariah & Lois, d. Nov. 17, 1778
Daniel, son John & Mary, b. Feb. 19, 1706
Daniel, m. Abiah PARKER, Oct. 28, 1735, by Mr. Theophilus Hall
Daniel, son Daniel & Abiah, b. Jan. 31, 1743/4
Daniel, Jr., m. wid. Elisabeth IVES, Apr. 3, 1766
Daniel, m. Mazy OSBORN, Oct 18, 1768
Daniel, Jr., m. Obedience COOK, Dec. 7, 1769
Daniel, Jr., d. Oct. 17, 1777
Daniel, son Samuell & Lowley, b. Apr. 19, 1778
Daniel, d. Jan. 21, 1786
Daniel M, m. Flora WOODING, b. of Wallingford, Oct 22, 1837, by Ransom Johnson
Daniel Stephens, son John, 2nd & Phebe, b. Nov. 20, 1786
David, son Benjamine & Hannah, b. July 9, 1736
David, son Benjamin & Hannah, d. Feb. 20, 1737
David, son Benjamin & Hannah, b. June 15, 1740
David, m. Elisabeth MERRIAM, Feb. last day, 1744/5
David, son David & Elisabeth, b. Apr. 13, 1749
David, son Stephen & Sarah, b. July 29, 1751
David, m. Dolle HOUGH, Sept 25, 1771
Dency, dau. Ransom & Sarah, b. Mar. 8, 1808
Dency, m. Ralph HILL, b. of Wallingford, Nov. 13, 1827, by Elder Joseph Glazier
Dinah, dau. Joseph & Esther, b. Apr. 4, 1721
Dinah, dau. Joseph & Mary, b. Mar. 20, 1746
Dolly, m. Jesse MERRIMAN, Jan. 15, 1784
Dorathy, dau. Titus & Dorathy, b. July 18, 1760
Dorathy, m. Jesse MERIMAN, Jan. 25, 1784
Ebenezer H., m. Harriet COOK, b. of Wallingford, Apr. 10, 1834, by Rev. Simon Shaylor
Edgar, son Levi & Asenath, b. Dec. 29, 1818
Eli, son John & Mary, b. June 25, 1780
Eli, m. Lodemia D. THOMPSON, b. of Wallingford, [______], by Rev. Lemuel B. Hull
Elihu, son Charles & Sarah, b. Feb. 28, 1764
Elihu, son Charles, Jr. & Mary, b. Oct. 9, 1787
Elihu, son Elihu & Rachael, b. Dec. 21, 1831
Eliza, m. Ellsworth HALL, b. of Wallingford, Jan. 26, 1848, by A. E. Denison
Eliza Ann, dau. William & Lowly, b. Oct. 27, 1823
Eliza Ann, of Wallingford, m. Phineas WARD, of Durham, Aug. 21, 1844, by Albert E. Dennison
Elesebeth, dau. Joseph & Esther, b. Sept 5, 1700
Elesebeth, dau. Joseph & Easter, b. Sept 6, 1700
Elizabeth, m. Benjamine HITCHCOCK, Oct 1, 1718, by Capt. Yall
Elisabeth, dau. Abram & Elisabeth, b. July 22, 1735
Elisabeth, w. Abraham, d. Aug. 4, 1735
Elizabeth, dau. Caleb & Elizabeth, b. Dec. 25, 1738
Elisabeth, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. Aug. 30, 1746
Elisabeth, dau. Joel & Rebeckah, b. July 22, 1749
Elesabeth, dau. Ephraim & Elesabeth, b. Nov. 6, 1751
Elisabeth, dau. Enos & Anne, b. Nov. 16, 1752
Elisabeth, dau. Joel & Rebecka, d. Feb. 21, 1756
Elisabeth, m. Aaron PARSONS, Nov. 19, 1759
Elisabeth, wid., m. Daniel IVES, Jr., Apr. 3, 1766
Elisabeth, w. Daniel, Jr., d. Nov. 7, 1767
Elisabeth, dau. Daniel, Jr. & Obedience, b. Sept. 17, 1771
Elnethan, son Gideon & Mary, b. Sept 22, 1706
Elnathan, m. Abigail FRISBIE, May 7, 1730, by Capt Yale
Elnathan, son Elnathan & Abigail, b. Mar. 20, 1731
Elnathan, son Ephraim & Elisabeth, b. Dec. 21, 1748
Emily, dau. Levi & Asenath, b. July 14, 1824
Enos, son Thomas & Rebecca, b. May 14, 1727
Enos, m. Anne COOK, Mar. 16, 1749
Enos, son Gideon, Jr. & Eunice, b. Oct. 25, 1753
Enos, son Enos & Anna, b. Apr. 25, 1759
Ephraim, son Joseph & Esther, b. Jan. 4, 1717
Ephraim, m. Elisabeth ATWATER, Mar. 12, 1741, by Rev. Samuell Hall
Ephraim, son Ephraim & Elisabeth, b. June 7, 1744
Ephraim, son Ephraim & Elisabeth, b. May 28, 1757, in Farmington
Easter, dau. Joseph & Easter, b. Jan. 17, 1706/7
Esther, m. Joseph SMITH, Dec. 20 1727, by Mr. Hall
Esther, dau. Gedean & Mary, b. Oct 14, 1729
Esther, dau. Stephen & Sarah, b. July 13, 1742
Esther, dau. Joseph & Mamre, b. Dec. 7, [1744
Esther, m. Ambrose TUTTLE, May 31, 1748
Esther, dau. Nathaniel & Mabel, b. Apr. 25, 1751
Esther, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. June 4, 1751
Esther, dau. Abel & Sarah, d. June 10, 1756
Esther, m. Thomas MERWIN, Feb. 18, 1762
Esther, dau. Nathaniel, Jr. & Repentance, b. Feb. 14, 1776
Eunis, dau. John & Hannah, b. Apr. 20, 1721
Eunis, dau. John & Hannah, d. Sept. 11, 1726
Eunis, dau. John & Hannah, b. May 13, 1727
Eunice, dau. Caleb & Elizabeth, b. Sept 13, 1736
Eunice, dau. Andrew & Sarah, b. Apr. 28, 1745
Eunice, m Josiah ROBINSON, Feb. 23, 1748/9 by Theophilus Hall
Eunice, dau. Gideon & Eunice, b. Sept 28, 1749
Eunice, dau. Ephraim & Elizabeth, b. Feb. 19, 1755
Eunice, m. Ebenezer COWLES, Jr., Dec. 1, 1768
Eunice, dau. Abraham & Eunice, b. Apr. 1, 1769
Eunice, wid., m. Dea. Ebenezer COWLES, Dec. 18, 1777
Experience, w. Joel, d. Mar. 30, 1761
Felekas?, dau. Ebeneser & Elesebeth, b. Oct 25, 1693 (Felix)
Finius, see under Phineas
George, son Isaac & Sarah, b. Apr.15, 1773
George, son Reuben & Loly, b. July 5, 1788
George, son Elihu & Rachael, b. Jan. 20, 1822
Gideon, m. Mary ROYS[E], Feb. 20, 1706, by Capt Yale
Gedion, son Gedion & Mary, b. Sept 24, 1720
Gideon, m. Elisabeth CORNWALL, May 10, 1743
Gideon, son Gideon, Jr. & Eunice, b. May 13, 1757
Gideon, son Joel, Jr. & Olive, b. June 14, 1785
Gideon, m. Charlotte HALL, Nov. 5, 1807
Gideon, son Gideon & Charlotte, b. May 6, 1816
Gideon, son Gideon & Charloth, d. Sept. 11, 1819
Gideon, son Gideon & Charlotte, b. Aug. 29, 1825
Gideon, d. _____,1826
Gideon, d. Nov. 29, 1826
Gideon, Jr., m. Eunice TUTTLE, Oct. 17, 1745
Gideon Bradley, son Amos & Rebecca, b. Mar. 4, 1778
Hannah, m. Joseph BENHAM, of Wallingford, Aug. 17, 1682, by Mr. Moss
Hannah, m. Samuell COOK, Mar. 3, 1692 by Mr. Moss
Hannah, dau. Joseph & Easter, b. Oct 13, 1701
Hannah, dau. Joseph & Esther, b. Oct. 13, 1701
Hannah, dau. Joseph & Easter, b. Oct 13, 1702
Hannah, dau. John & Mary, b. Feb. 10, 1708
Hannah, m. Abram SPERRY, June 1, 1725, by Mr. Samuell Hall
Hannah, dau. Benjamin & Hannah, b. Dec. 18, 1732
Hannah, m. John STANDLY, May 29, 1735, by Mr. Whitlesey
Hannah, dau. Joseph & Mary, b. Dec. 7, 1750
Hannah, dau. Titus & Dorathy, b. July 27, 1755
Hannah, wid. of Goshen, m. Phinehas ATWATER, June 15, 1768
Hannah, dau. Charles & Sarah, d. May 16, 1769
Hannah, w. Joel, d. Nov. 6, 177I, in the 46th yr. of her age
Hannah, m. Thomas GAYLORD, Feb. 6, 1772
Hannah, dau. Samuel, 2nd & Lucretia, b. Aug. 13, 1778
Hannah, dau. Aaron & Esther, b. Apr. 7, 1780
Hannah, m. Ivah CURTISS, Aug. 4, 1796
Hannah, dau. Amasa & Rebeccah, b. Mar. 17, 1797
Harley, son Caleb & Sarah, b. Jan. 15, 1803
Harley, of Durham, m. Ruth IVES, of Wallingford, Jan. 1, 1827, by Rev. Seth Ewer
Harriot, dau. William & Lowly, b. Sept. 27, 1807
Harriet Cook, dau. Ebenezer Hinsdale & Harriet, b. June 8, 1838
Harvey, son John & Phebe, b. Oct 1, 1796
Hiram Jerome, son Levi & Asenath, b. Apr. 20, 1817
Hulde, dau. Elnathan & Abigail, b. Jan. 16, 1747/8
Hulda, dau. Amass, Jr. & Hulda, b. Nov. 27, 1772
Ichabod, son Ephraim & Elisabeth, b. Sept 11, 1759, in Fannington
Ira, son John & Phebe, b. July 16, 1791
Isaac, son Thomas & Rebecca, b. Nov. 8, 1721
Isaac, m. Lydia MORGIN, June 13, 1744
Isaac, son John & Mary, b. Jan. 13, 1764
Isaac, son Stephen, Jr. & Susannah, b. Sept 26, 1768
Isaac, m. Sarah THOMPSON, Dec. 8, 1771
Isaac, son Ichabod & Mary, b. Feb. 8, 1782
Essabel, wid. Lazarus, d. Apr. 12, 1777
Isabel, dau. Timothy & Abigail, b. Feb. 17, 1787
James, son John, 3rd & Sarah, b. Oct 3, 1775
Jared, son Enos & Anne, b. Nov. 17, 1761
Jared, son Zachariah & Lois, b. Feb. 23, 1769
Jefferson, son Caleb, Jr. & Sarah, b. Mar. 11, 1801
Jerusha, dau. Elnathan & Abigail, b. Feb. 20, 1735
Jerusha, dau. Elnathan & Abigail, b. Feb. 21, 1735
Jerusha, dau. Gideon, Jr. & Eunice, b. Feb. 20, 1759
Jerusha, dau. John, 3rd & Sarah, b. Mar. 4, 1774
Jerusha, dau. John, 3rd & Sarah, d. Nov 27, 1776
Jerusha, m. Nathaniel Beadle JOHNSON, Aug. 31, 1780
Jerusha, dau. Ransom & Sarah, b. Sept 20, 1820
Jesse, twin with Joseph, son John & Hannah, b. Apr. 2, 1735
Jesse, son Daniel & Abiah, b. Nov. 12, 1756
Jesse, m. Sarah BELLAMY, Aug. 22, 1763
Jesse, son Enos & Anne, b. Jan. 2, 1771
Jesse, son Zachariah & Lois, b. Dec. 28, 1774
Jesse, son Samuel & Lowly, b. Jan. 19, 1775
Jesse, son Samuel & Lowly, d. Jan. 28, 1775
Joel, son Gedeon & Mary, b. Jan. 13, 1723
Joel, m. Rebeckah MERRIAM, Feb. 10, 1747/8
Joel, m Experience ROYS[E], Dec. 27, 1752
Joel, son Joel & Experience, b. Apr. 16, 1760
Joel, m. Hannah ATWATER, Nov. 4, 1762
Joel, Jr., m. Olive IVES, Oct 22, 1778
Joel, son Joel & Olive, b. Apr. 9, 1796
Joel, d June 3, 1808
Joel, son Joel & Experience, [_____]
Joel Hall, son John & Mary, b. Jan. 21, 1770
John, son John & Mary, b. Sept 28, 169[_]
John, m. [ ____] JELLET, Dec. 6, 1693, by Capt [____] Yaile
John, m. Hannah ROYS[E], Sept 18, 1719, by Capt. Yall
John, son John & Hannah, b. July 4, 1729
John Jr., d. Aug. 4, 1745
John, d. Apr. 15, 1747
John, son Daniel & Abiah, b. Feb. 19, 1747/8
John, son Isaac & Lydia, b. Dec. 25, 1748
John, son Abel & Sarah, b. Apr. 3, 1749
John, son John & Mary, b. May 1, 1762
John, Jr., in Lois HOTCHKISS, Jan. 1, 1770
John, Jr., m. Sarah HANDERSON, of New Hartford, May 29, 1770
John, son Daniel & Obedience, b. Aug. 28, 1774
John, son John & Lois, b. Dec. 20, 1775
John, son Ransom & Sarah, b. Apr. 3, 1804
John, d. Sept 27, 1826, age 79
John, m. Maryett AUSTIN, b. of Wallingford, Dec. 13, 1826, by Rev. Seth Ewer
John B., son Elihu & Rachael, b. Aug. 21, 1824
Jonathan Collens, son Amos & Rebecca, b. Apr. 19, 1780
Joseph, son John, [ _____]
Joseph, son John, b. Oct 14, 1674
Joseph, m. Easter BENNADICK, May 11, 1697, by Mr. Street
Joseph, son Joseph & Esther, b. Dec. 10, 1709
Joseph, m. Mamre MUNSON, June 13, 1733, by Mr. Hall
Joseph, twin with Jesse, son John & Hannah, b. Apr. 2, 1735
Joseph, son Joseph & Mamre, b. Jan. 17, 1737
Joseph, m. Mary BARNS, May 30, 1745, by Col. Benjamin Hall
Joseph, son John & Hannah, d. June 17, 1745
Joseph, son Nathaniel & Zensiah, b. June 15, 1749
Joseph, son Titus & Dorathy, b. May 10, 1757
Joseph, son Daniel, Jr. & Elisabeth, b. Dec. 23, 1766
Joseph, son John & Mary, b. Feb. 26, 1768
Joseph, son Titus & Martha, b. Mar. 3, 1768
Josiah, son Elnathan & Abigail, b. Mar. 13, 1739
Jotham, son Giddeon & Mary, b. Sept. 26, 1710
Jotham, m. Abigall BURROUGH, [___] 28, 1736, by Mr. Whitelsey
Jotham, twin with Abner, son Jotham & Abigail, b. Aug. 20, 1745
Jotham, d. Sept. 2, 1753
Jotham, son Nathaniel & Mahittable, b. Oct 1, 1753
Jotham, of Cheshire, m. Martha BROCKETT, of Hamden, Apr. 28, 1841, by Rev. Edwin R. Gilbert
Julia, of Wallingford, m. Truman IVES, of Cheshire, Apr. 15, 1827, by Samuel Miller
Julia Ann, dau. Ichabad & Mary, b. Apr. 6, 1793
Julia Ann, dau. Levi & Asenath, b. Jan. 2, 1823
Julius, of New Haven, m. Eunice A. BEADLE, of Wallingford, Mar. 25, 1833, by Rev. Edwin R. Gilbert
Laura, of Wallingford, m. Joel THARP, of Meriden, Feb. 22, 1821, by James Noyes
Lavinia, dau. Gideon & Charlotte, b. Nov. 27, 1813
Lavinia, dau. Gideon & Charloth, d. Sept 19, 1819
Laserus, son John & Mary, b. Feb. 5, 1703 (Lazarus)
Lazarus, m. Isabel JEAROM, Jan. 5, 1731, by Mr. Theophilus Hall
Lazarus, son Lazarus & Ishsabel, b. Nov. 2, 1734
Lazarus, d. Aug. 23, 1775
Lent, son Thomas & Rebecca, b. May 17, 1726
Lent, son Thomas & Rebecca, d. July 11, 1726
Lent, son Joseph & Mamre, b. Sept 12, 1735
Lent, son Nathaniel & Mehitable, b. Nov. 28, 1758
Lathy, dau. Ransom & Sarah, b. Apr. 4, 1810
Levi, son John & Hannah, b. Jan. 19, 1738
Leui, son John & Hannah, d. Dec. 20, 1739
Levi, son Benjamin & Hannah, b. July 23, 1743
Levi, son Benjamin & Hannah, d. Sept 9, 1745
Levi, son Benjamin & Hannah, b. Sept 18, 1748
Levi, son Daniel & Abiah, b. Mar. 29, 1750
Levi, son John & Mary, b. Apr. 24, 1766
Levi, son Timothy & Abigail, b. Feb. 21, 1773
Levi, son John & Phebe, b. Feb. 23, 1789
Levi, son John, 2nd & Phebe, b. Feb. 23, 1789
Levi James, son Levi & Asenath, b. Feb. 20, 1826
Lois, dau. Benjamine & Hannah, b. Mar. 10, 1734
Lois, dau. Stephen & Sarah, b. Jan. 9, 1737
Lois, dau. Enos & Anne, b. Apr. 16, 1750
Lois, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. Mar. 27, 1754
Lois, m. Joseph BLACKSLEE, Apr. 1, 1756
Lois, m. Giles HALL, Dec. 27, 1770
Lois, dau. Zachariah & Lois, d. Dec. 28, 1774
Lois, wid., m. Eliakim PARKER, Nov. 17, 1777
Lois, dau. Abijah & Hannah, b. May 28, 1780
Lois E., m. Allen LOUNSBURY, 2nd, b. of Wallingford, Mar. 12, 1843, by Saul Clarke
Lois Emily, dau. Miles & Lois, b. Feb. 10, 1824
Louisa, dau. William & Lowly, b. Nov. 29, 1813
Lowley, dau. Samuell & Lowley, b. Apr. 18, I776
Lowly, m. Abijah IVES, b. of Wallingford, July 15, 1827, by Samuel Miller
Lucinda, dau. Amass & Rebecah, b. July 27, 1786
Lucinda, dau. William & Lowly, b. Nov. 25, 1801
Lucretia, dau. John & Mary, b. Oct. 24, 1759
Lucretia, m. Samuel IVES, 2nd, Feb. 13, 1777
Lucretia, dau. William & Lowly, b. Mar. 30, 1815
Lucretia, m. Nelson COOK, b. of Wallingford, May 14, 1835, by Simon Shailer
Lucy, w. Abraham, d. Oct. 3, 1776
Lucy, dau. Charles & Sarah, b. Oct. 18, 1778
Lucy, dau. Amos & Lucy, b. Jan. 16, 1783
Lucy, dau. Elihu & Rachael, b. Oct. 15, 1815
Lucy, m. Gad ANDREWS, b. of Wallingford, May 4, 1836, by Rev. Simon Shailer
Lidea, m. Stephen TODD, May 26, 1726, by Rev. Mr. Stiels
Lidea, dau. Daniel & Abiah, b. June 11, 1738
Lydia, dau. Joseph & Mamre, b. Feb. 16, 1742/3
Lydia, dau. Daniel & Abiah, d. Mar. 5, 1753
Lydia, dau. Daniel & Abiah, b. Mar. 30, 1754
Lydia, dau. Isaac & Lydia, b. Aug. 25, 1760
Lydia, dau. Daniel & Abiah, b. May 22, 1761
Lydia, m. Benjamin DOOLTITLE, Jr., Nov. 20, 1765
Lydia, dau. John, 3rd & Phebe, b. Sept. 8, 1778
Lynda, m. William Russel HENDRICK, May 31, 1801
Lyman, son Abraham, Jr. & Eunice, b. Sept. 7, 1771
Major, son John & Lois, b. Feb. 13, 1772
Mamre, dau. Lorens & Isebell, b. Feb. 10, 1733
Mamre, dau. Joseph & Mature, b. May 2, 1738
Mamre, w. Joseph, d. Dec. 24, 1744
Mamre, m. Samuel HALL, Aug. 28, 1755
Marha, m. Ralph PARKER, Dec. 25, 1740, by Mr. Whittlesey
Maria, twin with Mary, dau. Ichabad & Mary, b. Dec. 5, 1801
Maria, m. James PARKER, Feb. 8, 1824, by James Noyes
Martha, dau. Gideon & Mary, b. Aug. 10, 1716
Martha, m. Ralf PARKER, Dec. 25, 1740
Martha, dau. Abijah & Abigail, b. May 7, 1742
Martha, of Wallingford, m. Gideon SMITH, of Lenox, Jan. 31, 1782, by Oliver Stanley, J. P.
Mary, dau. John & Mary, b. Mar. 10, 1702
Mary, m. Jonathan PENFIELD, Mar. 29, 1722, by Capt. Hall
Mary, dau. Gedion & Mary, b. Dec. 16, 1724
Mary, m. Elihu YALE, Oct. 1, 1726, by Capt. Yale
Mary, dau. Abijah & Abigail, b. Sept. 22, 1732
Mary, dau. Joseph & Mamre, b. May 26, 1734
Mary, dau. Stephen & Sarah, b. Apr. 16, 1735
Mary, w. Enson Gideon, d. Oct. 15, 1742
Mary, m. Moses MITCHEL, Apr. 11, 1745
Mary, dau. Gideon & Eunice, b. Aug. 5, 1746
Mary, dau. Nathaniel & Zerviah, b. Sept 26, 1746
Mary, m. Benjamin HALL, Dec. 27, 1752
Mary, m. Moses HULLS, May 5, 1757
Mary, dau. Enos & Anne, b. Apr. 25, 1766
Mary, m. Elijah HOUGH, Apr. 27, 1769
Mary, dau. John & Mary, b. Nov. 19, 1771
Mary, dau. John & Mary, b. Nov. 21, 1771
Mary, dau. John, 3rd & Phebe, b. Oct 12, 1782
Mary, dau. Amasa & Rebecah, b. Mar. 13, 1792
Mary, m. John HOOKER, Feb. 2, 1795
Mary, m. Moses HULLS, Apr. 28, 17[__]
Mary, twin with Maria, dau. Ichabod & Mary, b. Dec. 5, 1801
Mary, w. Ichabod, d. Jan. 9, 1826, age 64
Mathew, son David & Dolle, b. June 26, 1772
Mahittabel, dau. Samuell & Phebe, b. Mar. 29, 1724
Mehitabel, dau. Nathaniel & Mehitabel, b. Dec. 16, 1765
Merial, twin with Othniel, dau. John & Mary, b. Aug. 12, 1778
Miles, son Ichabad & Mary, b. May 15, 1791
Miles, m. Lois HULL, 2nd, b. of Wallingford, Jan. 1, 1823, by Samuel Miller
Miles, m. Eunice PECK, Aug. 8, 1827, by James Noyes
Millinda, dau. Nathaniel, Jr. & Repentance, b. Mar. 19, 1772
Milow, son William & Lowly, b. Jan. 24, 1819
Molly, m. Hiram MERRIMAN, b. of Wallingford, Mar. 8, 1821, by Samuel Miller
Moses, son Abijah & Abigail, b. Mar. 16, 1731
Moses, son Abijah, d. Nov. 13, 1755, at Lake George
Nathaniell, son John, b. May last, 1677
Nathaniell, m. Mary COOK, Apr. 5, 1699, by Mr. Street
Nathaniell, d. Nov. 6, 1711
Nathaniell, son Joseph & Esther, b. Jan. 15, 1714
Nathaniel, son Caleb & Mary, b. Jan. 12, 1722
Nathaniel, m. Zerviah BLAKSLEE, Nov. 8, 1744
Nathaniel, m. Mehitabel ANDRUSS, Jr., Jan. 1, 1745/6
Nathaniel, son Nathaniel & Mahitabel, b. Feb. 17, 1748
Nathaniel, son Nathaniel & Zurviah, b. Apr. 23, 1751
Nathaniel, Jr., m. Repentance WISE, Aug. 20, 1771
Nehemiah Roys[e], son Phinehas & Martha, b. Aug. 24, 1776
Nelia Maria, dau. Levi & Asenath, b. Sept 10, 1833
Norman, son Elihu & Rachael, b. July 3, 1819
Ogden, son Gideon & Charlotte, b. Aug. 21, 1811
Olive, dau. Daniel & Abiah, b. Nov. 29, 1741
Olive, dau. Caleb & Elisabeth, b. Aug. 10, 1742
Olive, dau. Charles & Sarah, b. Apr. 20, 1758
Olive, m. Nathaniel Hitchcock, Mar. 1, 1759, by Mr. Hall
Olive, dau. Daniel, Jr. & Obedience, b. Aug. 9, 1772
Olive, m. Joel IVES, Jr., Oct 22, 1778
Olive, dau. Joel, Jr. & Olive, b. Apr. 7, 1790
Olive, m. John MIX, Jr., Apr. 6, 1808
Orin, son Amos & Lucy, b. Aug. 24, 1787
Orra, m. Charles VAUTIE, July 23, 1807
Orrilla, dau. William & Lowly, b. Aug. 11, 1809
Othniel, son John & Mary, b. Nov. 16, 1775
Othniel, son John & Mary, d. Mar. 29, 1777
Othniel, twin with Merial, son John & Mary, b. Aug.12, 1778
Patty, dau. William & Lowly, b. Aug. 10, 1805
Patty, m. John HUNT, b. of Wallingford, Sept 11, 1828, by Sedgwick Rice
Perlina, dau. Caleb, Jr. & Sarah, b. Oct 2, 1799
Phebe, dau. Abijah & Abigail, b. Mar. 23, 1740
Phebe, m. William MERRIAM, May 29, 1751
Phebe, dau. Gideon, Jr. & Eunice, b. June 9, 1764
Phebe, m. Isaac HALL, 3rd, Sept 6, 1764
Phebe, dau. Timothy & Abigail, b. Mar. 19, 1771
Phebe, dau. Samuel, 2nd & Lucretia, b. May 9, 1780
Phebe, dau. Timothy & Abigail, b. Aug. 12, 1783
Phebe, dau. John, 3rd & Phebe, b. Sept 14, 1784
Philo, son Ransom & Sally, b. July 27, 1800
Finius, son Joseph & Esther, b. Apr. 8, 1711
Phineas, m. Margary MUNSON, Jan. 26, 1738, by Mr. Hall
Phinebas, son Ephraim & Elisabeth, b. June 12, 1746
Phinehas, son Phinehas & Margery, b. Oct. 31, 1746
Phinehas, d. May 17, 1762
Polly, dau. Ichabad & Mary, b. Apr. 26, 1796
Polly, of Wallingford, m. Nathan WILCOX, of Middletown, Feb. 9, 1824, by James Noyes
Polly, Mrs., m. John E. DUDLEY, Nov. 13, 1826, by William Marks, J. P.
Prudence, dau. Abijah & Abigail, b. June 19, 1744
Ransom, son Charles & Sarah, b. Oct. 17, 1775
Ransom, son Ransom & Sarah, b. Feb. 5, 1806
Rebecca, dau. Benjamin & Rebecca, b. Nov. 18, 1724
Rebecca, dau. Benjamin & Rebecca, d. Dec. 9, 1724
Rebecca, dau. Benjamin & Rebecka, b. Mar. 29, 1725
Rebecca, w. Benjamin, d. Apr. 25, 1727
Rebecca, w. Benjamin, d. Apr. 26, 1727
Rebeckah, wid., m. Enson Edward PARKER, Dec. 1, 1748
Rebecka, w. Joel, d. Nov. 5, 1750
Rebecka, dau. David & Elisabeth, b. Mar. 7, 1752
Rebecka, dau. Isaac & Lydia, d. July 10, 1752
Rebecca, dau. Enos & Anne, b. Jan. 9, 1755
Rebecca, dau. Isaac & Lydia, b. Jan. 3, 1758
Rebecca, m. Thomas HOUGH, Sept 30, 1772
Rebeccah, dau. Amasa & Rebeccah, b. July 10, 1794
Rebecca, see also Becca
Rubin, son Abraham & Barbary, b. Dec. 11, 1740
Reuben, son Elnathan & Abigail, b. Mar. 10, 1743/4
Reuben, son Isaac & Lydia, b. Dec. 3, 1753
Reuben, son Zechariah & Lois, b. Oct 26, 1761
Reuben, m. Elisabeth ROYS[E], Feb. 24, 1762
Reuben, m. Loly HULL, Sept 23, 1787
Reuben, d. Sept 20, 1826, age 64
Rhoda, dau. Gideon & Mary, b. Dec. 2, 1714
Rhoda, m. Immer JUDD, Dec. 28, 1743, by Mr. Whittelsey
Romaransom, son Samuel & Lola, b. Jan. 19, 1784
Rossalinda, dau. John & Lois, b. Dec. 20, 1773
Roxana, dau. Joel & Olive, b. Apr. 17, 1799
Roxanna, m. Martin JONES, b. of Wallingford, Aug. 17, 1820, by Samuel Miller
Ruth, m. Benjamin YALE, Mar. 23, 1737, by Mr. Stiles
Ruth, dau. Benjamin & Hannah, b. Jan. last day, 1738
Ruth, dau. Abel, Jr. & Lois, b. Apr. 2, 1761
Ruth, dau. Charles & Sarah, b. Jan. 26, 1772
Ruth, dau. Charles & Sarah, b. Jan. 27, 1772
Ruth, dau. Timothy & Abigail, b. Feb. 26, 1775
Ruth, dau. Gideon & Charlotte, b. Oct 21, 1808
Ruth, of Wallingford, m. Harley IVES, of Durham, Jan. 1, 1827, by Rev. Seth Ewer
Ruth, dau. Elihu & Rachael, b. Oct 30, 1829
Sally, dau. Joel, Jr. & Olive, b. Mar. 11, 1779
Sally, dau. Amass & Rebaccah, b. July 10, 1788
Sally, dau. Ransom & Sarah, b. Aug. 24, 1815
Sally, of Wallingford, m. Calvin HOTCHKLSS, of Meriden, Sept. 6, 1835, by Rev. Simon Shailer
Samuell, son John & Mary, b. Jan. 5, 1696
Samuell, m. Phebe ROYS[EI, Jan. 28, 1720, by Capt Yall
Samuell, son Samuell & Phebe, b. Jan. 28, 1733
Samuell, d. Aug. 29, 1734
Samuel, son Daniel & Abiah, b. Mar. 9, 1745/6
Samuel, son Bazaliel & Hannah, b. Jan. 5, 1752
Samuel, son Nathaniel & Zeruiah, b. May 1, 1756
Samuel, son Samuel & Lowly, b. Dec. 8, 1773
Samuel, m. Lowley PARKER, b. of Wallingford, Jan. 7, 1773, by Oliver Stanley, J. P.
Samuel, 2nd, m. Lucretia IVES, Feb. 13, 1777
Samuel, son Amos & Lucy, b. Feb. 18, 1790
Sarah, m. Edmund AUSTIN, Nov. 29, [ ___]
Sarah, dau. Gideon & Mary, b. Sept 9, 1708
Sarah, dau. Caleb & Mary, b. Aug. 6, 1725
Sarah, m. John HULLS, June 21, 1727, by Capt. Yale
Sarah, dau. Stephen & Sarah, b. May 29, 1733
Sarah, w. Caleb, d. Feb. 15, 1735
Sarah, dau. John & Sarah, b. June 2, 1735
Sarah, dau. Abram & Barbery, b. Dec. 23, 1736
Sarah, dau. Ephraim & Elizabeth, b. Nov. 19, 1741
Sarah, dau. Ephraim & Elisabeth, b. Nov. 20, 1741
Sarah, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. June 4, 1743
Sarah, dau. Abraham & Barbary, d. Oct 8, 1748
Sarah, dau. Andrew & Sarah, b. Nov. 24, 1748
Sarah, m. Amasa MERRIMAN, Sept 26, 1750
Sarah, dau. Jotham & Abigail, b. Apr. 14, 1752
Sarah, dau. Abel & Sarah, d. Feb. 14, 1756
Sarah, dau. Charles & Sarah, b. Feb. 16, 1756
Sarah, dau. Abel & Sarah, b. June 12, 1757
Sarah, dau. Gideon, Jr. & Eunice, b. June 5, 1761
Sarah, m. Stephen PECK, Mar. 3, 1774
Sarah, m. Isaac KIRTLAND, Dec. 28, 1778
Sarah, dau. John, 3rd & Phebe, b. Oct 8, 1780
Sarah, m. Ebenezer Rice HAWLEY, Oct 25, 1781
Sarah, dau. John 4th & Sarah, b. May 10, 1782
Simeon Hall, son Amos & Lucy, b. Sept 1, 1780
Steaphen, son Nathaniel & Mary, b. Mar. 24, 1704
Stephen, m. Sarah HART, Oct. 25, 1730, by Capt. Yale
Steven, a Stephen & Sarah, b. Jan. 20, 1739
Stephen, son Joseph & Mary, b. June 27, 1749
Stephen, Jr., m. Susannah PARKER, Nov. 20, 1766
Stephen Hall, son Gideon & Charlotte, b. Mar. 17, 1823
Susannah, dau. Gedion & Mary, b. May 26, 1727
Susannah, m. Elias ROBERTS, July 26, 1746
Thaddeus, son Timothy & Abigail, b. Sept. 28, 1781
Thankful, dau. Nathaniel & Mary, b. Aug. 15, 1708
Thankful, dau. Stephen & Sarah, b. July 15, 1744
Thankfull, dau. Benjamin & Hannah, b. June 1, 1746
Thankfull, dau. Joel & Experience, b. Oct. 1, 1757
Thankfull, m. Hezekiah FRANCIS, Feb. 16, 1775
Thomas, son Joseph & Easter, b. May 30, 1698
Thomas, m, Rebecca HOTCHKIS[S], Nov. 15, 1720, by Capt. Yale
Thomas, son Andrew & Sarah, b. June 18, 1746
Thomas, d. Jan. 13, 1747/8
Timothy, son Lazarus & Isabel, b. Oct. 16, 1731
Timothy, m. Abigail HALL, Apr. 12, 1770
Timothy, son Timothy & Abigail, b. Aug. 8, 1779
Titus, son John & Hannah, b. Feb. 17, 1732
Titus, son Joseph & Mary, b. Feb. 11, 1747
Titus, m. Dorathy HALSEY, Sept 17, 1754
Titus, m. Martha GAYLORD, Jan. 8, 1767
Titus, son Titus & Martha, b. Nov. 30, 1769
Titus, d. Sept. 2, 1776
Titus, son John & Mary, b. July 15, 1782
Truman, son Amos & Lucy, b. June 25, 1792
Truman, of Cheshire, m. Julia IVES, of Wallingford, Apr. 15, 1827, by Samuel Miller
Watrous, son Amass & Rebaccah, d. Feb. 16, 1784
Watrous, son Amass & Rebecah, b. Oct. 30, 1784
William, son John, 4th & Sarah, b. Dec. 23, 1779
William Walter, son William & Lowly, b. Dec. 3, 1816
Wooster, son William & Lowly, b. Feb. 15, 1811
Woster, son William & Lowly, b. Feb. 15, 1811
Zachariah, son Jotham & Abigail, b. Jan. 31, 1737
Zechariah, m. Lois HARRISON, Jan. 15, 1761
Zurviah, dau. Nathaniel & Zurviah, b. Dec. 15, 1753
______, son Nathaniel & Mahittabel, b. Apr. 7, 1763
____uncey, son Zechariah & Lois, b. Aug. 8, 1763
_____n, ch. of Jesse & Sarah, b. Feb. 15, 1764
______, d. Titus & Dorathy, b. Apr. 13, 1764
_____is, dau. Zachariah & Lois, b. Apr. 22, 1766
______, son Charles & Sarah, b. Apr. 29, 1766
____ier, dau. Stephen & Susannah, b. Jan. 27, 1767
____el, son Abraham, Jr. & Eunice, b. Feb. 15, 1767
______, ch. of Levi, d. 1826


IVY, [see also IVES]

John, son William & Ruth, b. May 10, 1740

NORTHROP

Laurence B., m. Polly HALL, b. of Wallingford, Jan. 10, 1846, by Rev. H. Miller, of Meriden

 

 

-------------------

Skiff Mountain Cemetery Kent, Ct.

Skiff Mountain Burying Ground

Kent, Connecticut

From Burying Grounds of Charon, CT

Amenia and North East, N. Y.

Published Amenia, NY 1903



Stones copied by Francelia Johnson
Burials listed from Kent Burial Records

...........This cemetery is located atop Skiff Mountain in the northwestern part of the town. Half the cemetery belongs to the town and half belongs to the Peck Family. The listings below are for the cemetery as a whole and not divided between the two.

Ives, George N. buried Nov. 6, 1896 no stone Could this be George Northrop Ives???
Ives, Hannah M. wife of George N. died Feb. 27, 1877 age 49
Ives, Joseph 1815-1893
Ives, Morris (Maurice) died Feb. 5, 1863 age 34
Ives, Sally wife of Joseph 1815-1883
Ives, Walter J son of George & Hannah M died Feb. 27, 1877 age 49There are several Ives Hitchcock connections BENJAMIN HITCHCOCK and ELIZABETH IVES, son Bela corn wallingford,

SARAH HITCHCOCK, b. August 01, 1757, Wallingford, CT; m. PHINEHAS IVES, January 30, 1799, Cheshire, Ct.

norfolk, ct

John Northrup & Elizabeth Stevensm. Jan 22, 1793

 

 

Parents of Harvey Northrop, b. 1795
Posted by: Chris Northrop
cmnorthrop@hotmail.com
Date: March 11, 1999 at 19:39:02


Looking for the parents of Harvey Northrop, b. 31 aug 1795 woodbury, so. litchfield, ct
father of easton enoch northrop.
harvey married lovina ellis 30 aug 1817
parents quite probably elijah and lucina northrop, but havent found a definite link. also looking for all children of elijah and lucina.

Re: Northrops of Milford, CT
Posted by: dwight northrop holbrook
Date: September 18, 2001 at 07:42:29
In Reply to: Re: Northrops of Milford, CT by Joan Northrop Weed

I have records from the family back to the late 1700 that I trust. They say! Samual b 1651 Milford. Amos(1) b 1689 Moved to New Milford then Brookfield. I have a paper that saids alos "His widow married a Mr. Peck and moved to Brookfield Amos, (!1,2,3,?) lived there until he grew up, when taking his portion of his fathers property he bought of large farm in New Milford and lived and died there. Amos(2) b1713 b Milford m Milford joind the 1st church 1748 by letter from Am???(Woodbrodge) He ought 06-30-1743 og Job Terril of New Milford for 1600 pounds 190 acers of land at what is now Park Lane, east side of road, includinf 17 1/2 acres with a dwelling house therson, where he lived and died. Amos(3) b 1742 New Milford settled on a farm in Poplar Shut? about 1/2 mile north of New Milford, on the west side of the road. Thomas Grant b 1771 New Milford m New Stratford Residence Kent!
The Hatch-Pratt-Northrop-Tallman-Andreew House was built in the 1700's on the forteenth lot of the first division of the "Great Plain" the original settlement of Kent in Flanders. The lot was drawn by Timothy Hatch, a proprietor from Tolland, Conn., who became one of the towns leading citizens. the eventually passed to Samual and Joseph Hatch, then to Joseph Jr. who sold it to Azarah Pratt in 1790. The house was evidently built sometime shortly thereafter by one of the Pratt's as the deed signed by Jospeph Pratt in 1797 list "one quarter of an acre with dwelling house standing on said land" bought by Thomas Grant Northrop. Last time I was by, 20 odd year age it was still there. I hope this helps you.

 

---

mimiworld@aol.com (old) said she'd love to see Joseph's home in Milford

 

 

connection to Stratton Burr "of Monroe" who m. Huldah Northrop "Of Monroe"

Hanford b 1806, Harriet, Harry, Hepsy, Halsey, Mehitable, Charles G., Mary A. , Rosilla A. , Erastus,

A general history of the Burr family, with a genealogical record from 1193 to 1891 (1891)

 

Northrup, Hannah, d. Sep. 10, 1824 age 69 yrs, wife of Gideon Northrup

Old Camden Burial Ground
Camden, Oneida County, New York

 

 

50. Sabra Preston, b. Litchfield (Harwinton), Ct., April 20,

1798; d. , Camden, N. Y., and was bur. in Mexico Street

Cemetery, no gravestone; m. David Northrop, b. , at ;

d. , at . He was a shoemaker and lived in Camden, N. Y.

He was a son of Gideon Northrup (b. , 1752, Plymouth, Ct.;

d. , 1842, in Pennsylvania) and his first wife Hannah Hitchcock (b. , 1775, Plymouth, Ct.; d. Sept. 10, 1824, at Camden,

N. Y., and was bur. there in Mexico Street Cemetery) of Camden, N. Y.

Children: ? (Northrop). I have a note to the effect that they had a son Samuel and a daughter Emily Northrop who m. a man named White and had a son George H. White who served in die Civil War. Emily (Northrop) White was alive May 20, 1899, and living at No. 32 Faxton Street, Utica, N. Y. Authority :—

History of Camden, N. Y., pp. 31, 43, 46, 296-

The New York genealogical and biographical record

GIDEON NORTHRUP.
Gideon Northrup was born in Plymouth, Conn., in 1753. He
married Hannah Hitchcock, who was born in the same town
in 1775. Thev came to Camden to reside, and their names are
associated with its earliest history. Mr. Northrup purchased a
tract of land nearly opposite the David Osborn place, and. the
deed of it is said to l)e one of the earliest on record in the County
Clerk's office. An old barn is still standing, although in a very
dilapidated condition, a relic of pioneer davs. A ])ump has been
placed over the old well, which is just outside of the fence m
the highway. Thirteen children were born to them, viz.: Luc\,
Anna, Munson, Kbenezer. Jessie, Isaac, Medad, Rebecca, Daniel,
Merrit, llaunah. David and I'-slhcr. The mother of (lideon
Northrup ])robably came to the town with her sons, as her rleath
is recorded in the early history of the Congregational Church
as occurring December 1, 1812, aged 86. Hannah, the wife ot
Gideon Northru]), laid down the burden of life at the age of 69
years, September 10, 1SJ4. She n-sts in the Mexico Streetcounty,
Cemetery. I Icr hu-band married the widow of \oah Tiithill,
and moved to I'orns\ Ivania. wh.ere he died in 1842.O
PIOXEER HISTORY OF TEE rOTT^Y OF CAMhKN. Oneida County, NY

We find the name of David Smith in very o](\ (\cc(]s, wliicii
shows that he owned a large tract of land in its primitive state
at an early date.
Joseph Northrup emigrated here before his father, Gideon,
and bought land here and on Mexico street. They lived together
in PLirwinton, Conn., not far from Allen and John Sperry's, who belong to our pioneers. Their home was near the
Naugatuck River. Joseph Xorthrup married Cynthia, daughter
of Enos Blakeslee, and in buying land here the contract was made
out to Joseph and Cynthia Xorthrup, from David Smith, and
signed by Ambrose Curtiss and David Bartholomew of Plymouth,
Conn. As Mr. Joseph Northrup did not settle here hrst, ne
must have transferred this property to Manning Barnes, the
hrst permanent settler, who came here in 1802, whose deed was
given in 1806, but not recorded until 1825.
Manning Barnes erected a log house and made a clearmg,
and this was the end of the road. It was simply an Indian patM
beyond, only to be traced by blazed trees towards W'illiamstow n.
This was the first clearing within the present limits, and also the
first log house which served as a habitation. He soon brousfht
Manninic Barnes' ki >!ilei^ c,
his newly-wedded wife, Lucy daughter of Gideon Northrup.
The frame of this building was added at different times to the
log house. Soon after settling here he hung out a sign and made
a business of tavern keeping for a good many years. The log
hotise was where now stands the store occupied by Mr. Leigh.
The original road through West Camden ran back of what is now
Lucius S. Smith's farm and S. ^". Palm's, coming out on the
Amboy road on the hill near Mrs. Leigh's house. This road was
altered August 13, 1822—Enos Blakeslee, Surveyor. Mr. Barnes
lived to see the progress of this place: and well he remembered
THE TOWN OF CAMDEN. 3,,
of visitations in the early days from tlic Oneida Indians tliat
would pass through every autumn on their way to Salmon River
to fish and hunt and lay in their stock of winter provisions. Thev
would stop at Mr, Barnes' to cook and feast.

The first house that was built where John H. Taylor lives was
built by Ora Ballard in 1812. Ora Ballard married Sally, daughter
of Joseph Northrup. They went as missionaries to the Indians
at St. Joseph, Mo., returned in old age, and died at her
sister Emily's (Mrs. Riley Preston), in Pennsylvania. Ora Ballard
was brother of Deacon Roswell and blind Henry Ballard,
and Mrs. Erastus Upson.

ENOS BLAKESLEE.
The next farm in succession, to the east, on the north side of
the highway, was ])urchascd from George Scriba bv Ichabod
I'-rown in 1801. He followed the tide of emigration westward,
and located in Camden. I'ut little can lie learned of him other
than this, that he came from Connecticut, and was a soldier
in the War of the Revolution. In 1805 Enos Blakeslee bought
the farm of Ichabod Brown. Enos Blakeslee married Sarah
Northrup in the year 1785, at Harwinton, Litchfield Countv,
THE TOWN OF CAMDEN.
'47
Ccnn. He came with the regulation ox cart. Mr. Blakeslee
was a surveyor by occupation, and found much in his line to
employ his time after coming to this new home. We find his
name frequently in the early book of town surveys. In 1810 he
erected the house which is at present standing, the home of the
Home of Enos Blakeslee.
heirs of Benjamin Blakeslee. When Mr. Blakeslee first came
to the ownership of this farm, but a half acre of land had been
cleared, where the house stands. The barn on the place was
built in 1824. The house is the same in exterior form and appearance
as of yore, having had new siding, windows, and paint
only. Their children were: Reuben, Daniel, Marilla, Scriba,
Mary, Cynthia and Bela, all born in Connecticut but Bela. Reuben
and Cynthia located in Pennsylvania, Scriba and Mary in
Michigan, and Daniel, Marilla and Bela in Camden. Bela and
Marilla occupied the old home of their father.
Enos Blakeslee, born in Hanvinton, Conn., 1756; Sara Northlup,
born in Harwinton, Conn., 1762. Enos Blakeslee died August,
1842, aged 86 years; Sarah Blakeslee died August, 1848,
aged 86 years. Buried in Four Mile Square Cemetery.

ISAAC XORTHRUP.
Isaac, son of Gideon Northrup, was born Xovember id, 1799,
in Camden. When he reached manhood, and decided to make
a home for himself, he bought fifty-two acres of land of Jesse
Cnrtiss of Clinton, and built a house nearl\' opposite the Lyman
Matthews place. The house was burned many years ago, and a
new one erected o?i the site, r.ow occupied by William
Barnes. He married Lucinthia Cook, and settled in his new
home. Here eight children were born—Hannah, born January
5, 1827; Mary, June 5, 1831; Amanda, April 14, 1833; Lucinthia,
April 7, 1835; Thomas I., March 3, 1837; John J., April 3, 1839;
Henry C, Octol)er 4. 1844; Orson C, February 8, 1874.
Lucintha married N. \\'. Eaton, Oct. 8, 1857; she is the only
one living in Camden. One son and two grandchildren are the
only descendants. Mr. and Mrs. Eaton have lived all of their
married lives in t1;c h.ofsc they first occujMcd at the foot of Mt.
Parnassus.
Isaac Northrup died March 14, 1854; his wife following him
two years later, Sept. 3, 1856. They rest in Forest Park Cemetery

Pioneer history of Camden, Oneida County, New York .. (1897)

 

1790 Census Woodbridge prob included Plymouth and Warrren Washington. Gideon Northrop is there also manyHitchcocks and Wilmot
  • ID: I03791
  • Name: Samuel Northrup III 1 2 3 4 5 s/o Samuel Northrup , Sr. b: 26 OCT 1651 in Milford andSarah Briscoe b: ABT. 1653 in New Milford>Joseph brother of Gideon
  • ALIA: Samuel * /Northrop/
  • Birth: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut 2
  • Death: BEF. 1787
  • Will: 1787 Samuel's estate settled. He spelled his name "Samuel Northrop" in his will. 2
  • ADDR: Washington Connecticut

    Father: Samuel Northrup , Jr. b: ABT. JUN 1687 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    Mother: Sarah Andrews b: ABT. SEP 1688

    Marriage 1 Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    • Married: 10 JUN 1746 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., Connecticut 2
    Children
    1. Has No Children Lydia Northrup b: 22 OCT 1747 in Washington Co., Connecticut prob d b4 1787 not in father's will.
    2. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 1 APR 1749
    3. Has No Children Phoebe Northrup b: ABT. 1751 in Washington Co., Connecticut m. John Stoddard
    4. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: ABT. 1753
    5. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 18 OCT 1755 in Washington Co., Connecticut
    6. Has Children Samuel Northrup IV b: ABT. 1757 in Milford Township, Connecticut No already has Amos Frisbie Northrop
    7. Has Children Enoch Northrup b: ABT. 1759 in Washington Co., Connecticut 1790 census matches for 3 girls + wife
    8. Has Children Elijah Northrup b: ABT. 1761 in Washington Co., Connecticut married too late

  • ID: I08199
  • Name: Enoch Northrup 1 2 3
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT. 1759 in Washington Co., Connecticut 2
  • Death: UNKNOWN
  • Event: Legal Documents Enoch served as the Executor of his father's estate.
  • Residence: Removed to Woodbury, Litchfield Co., Connecticut

    Father: Samuel Northrup III b: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    Mother: Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut

    Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
    Children
    1. Has No Children Mary Northrup b: ABT. 1782
    2. Has No Children Irene Northrup b: ABT. 1784
    3. Has No Children Charlotte Northrup b: ABT. 1786
  • Father: Samuel Northrup III b: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    Mother: Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut

    Marriage 1 Sarah Frisbie b: ABT. 1755

    • Married: 3 JUN 1779
    Children SEEMS LIKE A LONG TIME BETWEEN MARRIAGE and KIDS COULD YEARS BE WRONG??
    1. Has No Children Sarah Northrup b: 1787
    2. Has No Children Alma Northrup b: 1793
    3. Has No Children Lydia Northrup b: ABT. 1795
    4. Has No Children Betsey Northrup b: ABT. 1797
    5. Has No Children Amos Northrup b: ABT. 1799
    6. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: ABT. 1801
    7. Has No Children Sally Northrup b: ABT. 1803

     

    ROLL OF MEMBERS OF THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH IN WOODBURY.

    This church was organized as the second church of Stratford, under the ministry of Rev. Ze.chariah Walker, May 5, 1670. In 1672-3, the larger portion of its members removed, and settled the town of Woodbury. The following is a complete list of its members from its first organization. It is given because it contains the names of all the church members in the territory of " Ancient Woodbury," for nearly sixty years, and because all the other early churches in the territory, of whatever name, were founded, in the first instance, by men who had been nurtured in its bosom. The admissions only are given. Deaths, excommunications and regular dismissions are

    LIST OF PERSONS

    Who " owned the baptismal" or half-way " covenant," during Rev. Mr. Stoddard's ministry, most of whose names have appeared in the foregoing list of members in full communion, having been subsequently received as such.

    1822

    Mary Northrop, (N. Y.,) Jan. 6.
    Irene Northrop, (N. Y.,) Jan 6

    daughters of Enoch >Samuel>Samuel 1651> Joseph

    Admitted to church

    There were 2 Samuels in Amenia in 1810, so they may have transferred from a NT church.

    • ID: I18794
    • Name: Daniel Northrop 1 2 3 4 5
    • Sex: M
    • ALIA: Daniel * /Northrup/
    • Birth: 20 NOV 1757 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut 2
    • Death: 22 OCT 1788 2 of Drowned
    • Military Service: Served (American Revolutionary War)
    • Event: Legal Documents Daniel's estate was insolvent when he died.

      Father: Gideon Northrup , Sr. b: ABT. 1725 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
      Mother: Esther Munson b: 1727 in Derby, New Haven Co., Connecticut

      Marriage 1 Rebecca Huggins b: ABT. 1758 Married: 7 DEC 1779 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut Brother John Heaton Huggins stays in New Haven. Children
      1. ? Could there be an earlier child?
      2. Has Children Samuel Northrop b: ABT. 1785 in New Haven, Connecticut Oneida County Sea Captain Privateer war of 1812 Died at sea one child listed born 1814 no first name female married a whitney.
      3. Has Children Daniel Northrop b: 27 DEC 1787 in New Haven, Connecticut

      Orphaned early, his Uncle Samuel Huggins took & reared him to manhood in Oneida Co., New York ADDR: Putney, Steuben Co. Tanner, Saddler, Farmer, Justice of the Peace

      Has kids named George and William

    It is intersting to observe on the gravestones that widows were called relicts and wives who predeceased their husbands are called consorts.

     

     

    Derby CT

    NORTHROP.

      ISAAC, m. Hannah Wheeler, Sept. 27, 1764. She died Mar. 6, 1765.

    Waterbury

    NORTHRUP

    • Jonathan, £59, 1771

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Matthew millard woodbury cong churcg 1741

    Halfway covenant
    1712 john burr of newtown

    Somewhere around 1700 we see Northrops movng away from Milford and the areas closer to long island Sound and directly along major waterways.Dfferent branches move north and west.

    This passage from the history of Kent gives some clues why they started expanding out at ths pont. ".....The period of the settlement of Kent was that of Connecticut's first attack of the western fever, and this is how it was brought on. As has been said, but little value was attached to the teritory of Litchfield county, before the beginning of the last century. There was land enough nearer the center of the colony, and the population was still too limited for the peopling of new towns. But after the reinstatement of the colonial charter in 1694, and the consequent restored security of the colony, enterprise, which had languished during the reign of James, revived, the population of the colony increased, and inquiry began to be made for territory for new settlements. The earliest response to this demand, in this section of the state,.was the exploration and sale of the territory of the town of Litchfield. This territory was included in the "Western Lands" conveyed by the colony to the towns of Hartford and Windsor in 1686-7, and the sale of it was the ilrst disposal of that territory which the towns had made. In the spring of 1715, a committee of these towns, of whom John Marsh, the ancestor of the Marshes of Litchfield, was one, and the seeming chief, visited the region, "viewed" it, and secured deeds of it from the Indians; their bills for service, against the towns, giving intimation of the primitive wildness of the region, as by the following items from the Hartford records: —...

    The sale of the territory of Litchfleld by the towns of Hartford and Windsor, roused the colony to assert its claim to the Western Lands, and in 1719 at the May session, the legislature enacted: —

    "That the whole of said tract of Land shall lie for the further dispose of this assembly, and all surveyors and persons appointed to lay out lands, are hereby forbidden to bound or lay out any of said land without the special order of this assembly."

    Nevertheless, Hartford and Windsor went on disposing of the land, and a fierce controversy arose between the colony on the one side, and these two towns and the settlers in the Western Lands to whom they had sold tracts, on the other, which was settled as records show, by compromise, in 1726, the colony taking one, the western half, and the two towns the other, the eastern half; Litchfield, as already disposed of, being left out of the division.

    This long controversy had thoroughly advertised the unsettled lands,

    1738; Cornwall at Fairfield, in February of the same year; Kent at Windham, in March;

    ...young men "went west to grow up with the country;" and all north and east of Kent was alive, as was itself, with the interest of.new settlement.

    Litchfield's Golden age was

    The railroad came through Kent in the early 1840's. " The prosperity of the town of Kent was checked with the advent of the railroad. It was once a flourishing community when every night twenty- one two and four horse teams could be seen entering the town from the direction of Quaker Hill loaded with iron ore to be cast into pigs and then hauled thirty miles to Poughkeepsie to market. The crack of the whips of so many drivers is gone and the charm of the town now lies in its quietness and solitude." history of kent

    There are no Northrops in the earliest divison of Kent, but the listings nclude familiar names connected to the Northrops through marriages Hubbell, Canfield, Smith, Fuller, Marsh, Pratt, Peck, Porter, Sanford, Camp. There are also references to the "Fairweather purchase" which ncluden parts of Kent, Warren, Washington.

    old colonial records where it was found that in 1707 there was a large tract of land granted to Hon. Nathaniel Gold, Peter Burr and several others of Fairfleld for a township in what is now the southern portion of Kent and the northern portion of New Milford, and that they in turn sold a part or all of it to Robert Silliman, Richard Hubbell and Benjamin Fairweather, the latter being described as the "cornet of the troop in Fairfleld." The latter's purchase contained some 3,800 acres and was six miles in length from east to west and three hundred rods wide. When the owner died the large tract was divided between his heirs.

     

     

    Besides family connections, Other connectons that might lead to meeting a future spouse include local church meetings, military service "May. 1739, passed a resolution that "the military companies in the towns of Kent, Woodbury, New Milford, Litchfleld, Cornwall, Goshen, Canaan, Norfolk, Salisbury, Sharon, and New Pairfleld shall be one entire regiment to be distinguished by the name of the Thirteenth regiment." Train bands contnued to practice together for decades [John Northrop Gunn reference], Actual servce in the Indian Wars, Revoluton, War of 1812., Religious leadership -some preachers were ntinerant until they were called to a specfic parsh and Episcopal and Methodist preachers worked on a circuit. Beyond that -- relatonships between preachers started with apprentice-like training for college and continued theough correspondence and meetings of ther organzations, community events included raisings, bees of various sorts

    OSBORN, Lewis {850} b: 09 Sep 1768 New Milford (now Brookfield),
       ┆   Fairfield, CT d: 08 Sep 1825 Brookfield, Fairfield, CT #: OSBO13
      +  +NORTHROP, Mary "Molly" b: 1780 Kent, Litchfield, CT d: 09 Sep 1866
       ┆   Brookfield, Fairfield, CT #: OSBO20

     

     

    all at once," to use a familiar phrase, the country sprang into life at the period of the settlement of Kent: Nortnbury church, organized 1740; Westbury, 1740; Bethlehem, 1740; Washington, 1742; Kent, 174i; Goshen, 1740; Cornwall, 1741; Canaan, 1741; Torrington, 1741; Harwinton, 1737; New Hartford, 1738. So that Kent was by no means born alone. Its settlement was but one manifestation of a movement that pervaded the colony, the first great set of Connecticut's westward tide; the tide that, with its successive flowings, has peopled the continent with its best inhabitants and noblest life.

    While the new life of Kent society was crystalizing into form, the same process of the beginnings of religious and civil organization was going on in the communities around it. As the primeval forest still covered this parish, unbroken save by the settler's clearings, so over Litchfield county the primitive wilderness stretched unbroken, save where here and there the centres were being established of the several towns. It is the period from which the life of Litehfield county takes its date.

    Westbury, now Watertown, was constituted an ecclesiastical society in 1738, the same year as Kent.

    In Bethlehem, the first settlers are petitioning the General Assembly to be constituted a distinct society, which petition was granted at the October session, 1739, and the church was organized the following spring, March 27, 1740.

    In Washington, too, the first settlement is under way, the pioneer settler, Joseph Hurlburt, locating there in 1736, and the community petitioning in 1741, to be organized into an ecclesiastical society, which was done by the General Assembly at the October session of that year, the society being named "Judea," likely from the hill country of Palestine, which of old bore that name. Immediately on the organization of the society, the building of the meeting-house was proceeded with, the inhabitants stating, in a petition to the General Assembly in May 1742,that they had "Unanymously and Lovingly Agreed upon a place for to set a Meeting House; ' the only instance of the kind in the early history of the county. The house was built during the same year; the cnurch being organized Sept. 1st., 1742; Rev. Reuben Judd, the first pastor being ordained the same day; the ceremonies taking place in a grove—the other society in the town, that of New Preston, was organized October, 1752.

    Into the "Wilderness" the first invasion was the settlement of Litchfield, and this introduces us to one of the most curious and interesting chapters of Connecticut history, as well as to a matter which early engaged the attention of Northbury; it being the subject of a controversy which the new society waged with the mother town, from the time of its organization as a society until after it became a town itself—the famous affair of the"Western Lands." In the records of Waterbury, 1741, there is the following entry with reference to the matter: —

    "There having been considerable discourse about the money for which the western lands were sold and granted for the use of the school, and not agreeing in what method it should be disposed of, (the town) did by vote agree that they would refer it to some indifferent gentlemen, to be decided by them where the said money shall be disposed, whether it belongs to the first parish (of Waterbury) or should be divided among the several parishes (including Westbury and Northbury)."

    What were these "western lands?" The original title to the territory of New England was the grant, in 1620, by James I. to the Plymouth Company, of England of

    "All that part of America lying and being in breadth from the fortieth degree of north latitude, from the equinoctial line, to the forty-eighth degree of said northerly latitude inclusively, and in length of and with all the breadth aforesaid, throughout the main land from sea to sea."

    Among the first division of Kent were:
    Ephraim Hubbel, multiple m. Abigail Bradley d. Kent, Sherwood, Noble, Fuller
    Peter Hubbel, multiple of greenfield connection to betts,, hurlburt
    Richard Hubbel, multiple stratford, ffld, newtown fairweather, burritt wheeler
    Jedediah Hubbel (also as JH, Esq. both later)...Fairfield, Newtown Stratfield Bradley (mother) Noble, Northrop, Hickox, Hurlbut, Wheeler later Lanesboro
    Johnathan Hubbel, multiple Fairfield, Newtown, Stratforfd Bethlehem, Derby Prudden, Burr, Silliman Morehouse,Wakeman in 1631 in Eng Alford m. in Ill

    Samuel Canfleld, multiple Samuel Canfield and others,

    and later
    John Smith, multipleDavid Smith,Nathaniel Smith,
    Joseph Fuller,
    Pelatiah Marsh.Cyrus Marsh, ,multipleEbenezer Marsh, multiple ,Heirs of Colonel Ebenezer Marsh,William Marsh
    Azariah Pratt, Daniel Pratt, multiple Joseph Pratt Jr., Daniel Pratt, Peter Pratt,
    Joseph Peck,
    John Porter,
    ,Nathaniel Sanford,
    Nathaniel Sanford and Henry Silsby,
    Jabez Swift, multipleZephania Swift,
    Nathaniel Slosson,
    Isaac Camp, Isaac Camp

    1738,

    The old deeds refer frequently to the Fairweather purchase, but as there is no deed on record in Kent of this property a search was made through the old colonial records where it was found that in 1707 there was a large tract of land granted to Hon. Nathaniel Gold, Peter Burr and several others of Fairfleld for a township in what is now the southern portion of Kent and the northern portion of New Milford, and that they in turn sold a part or all of it to Robert Silliman, Richard Hubbell and Benjamin Fairweather, the latter being described as the "cornet of the troop in Fairfleld." The latter's purchase contained some 3,800 acres and was six miles in length from east to west and three hundred rods wide. When the owner died the large tract was divided between his heirs.

    1826

    About this time there was considerable agitation to have a canal from Stockbridge, Mass., to tide water at Derby. This is the language of the resolution the town meeting passed: "That we claim it is the interest and duty of every individual situated near the proposed route to aid and assist in the completion of this object oy endeavoring to promote and otherwise concert in measures calculated to effect it by lending funds as circumstances may enable and the vastness of the undertaking may require. That no other route to tide water heretofore suggested is by us regarded as equally important or can equally well accommodate this town or that portion of the public subjected to land carriage which lies between the Connecticut and Hudson rivers."

    May. 1739, passed a resolution that "the military companies in the towns of Kent, Woodbury, New Milford, Litchfleld, Cornwall, Goshen, Canaan, Norfolk, Salisbury, Sharon, and New Pairfleld shall be one entire regiment to be distinguished by the name of the Thirteenth regiment."

    ...The War of the Revolution impoverished where it did not devastate. For many years there was practically no money. Mr. Bordwell was from necessity a farmer, and during the long winter a tutor as well; for like most of the ministers of the day, he fitted many a boy for college. The spiritual destitution of the period was even greater than the material. Skepticism and infidelity were rampant, and the church that held its own did well.

    ...wife of John Millard, Sr.
    1776.
    Widow Rebeckah Millard,

    1784.
    Abram Beecher and his wife,
    Lois Coleman,
    Aaron Coleman,

    i807.
    Dr. Oliver Fuller and his wife,
    Aurelia Northrop,

    1816 Hannah Fenn,

    Record Is incomplete previous to 1812, and there is no means by which the manner of removal from the church can be ascertained.

    no record after 1812 on -- so maybe before 1812 or not members of this church?

    EPISCOPAL
    The next rector was Samuel Clark, who went to New Milford in 1768. He was a native of West Haven and a graduate of Yale college. Under him the first real attempts at organization were made. They are upon the parish register two very old documents of his day; they are the earliest records the parish now possesses. The first of these papers is dated at New Milford February 7, 1770; it is a receipt to Reuben Swift for his ministerial (church tax) for the year 1769. The second is dated Dec. 2, 1771, and shows that occasional services were being kept. It is a notice of Mr. Clark's intention to preach in Kent the coming Sunday. It was owing to the co-operation of this worthy layman, Reuben Swift, that the church for which Mr. Palmer began to gather subscriptions in 1760, was finally built in 1772 or early in 1773. Mr. Swift lived just to see it finished as he died the same year. This ancient building stood about thirty yards to the south of the present church. It was afterwards converted into a town hall, and still later the frame was used for a barn, now the property of George Hopson.

    Mr. Clark remained at his post until 1787 when he migrated to Nova Scotia. The years 1768-87 covered by Mr. Clark's ministry were dark days for the church in America. The nearest bishop was 3,000 miles across the Atlantic. It was not until 1785 that a bishop set foot upon these shores. Besides the want of a bishop there were other hardships to bear. The church was small in numbers; she was hated and despised by the multitude who regarded Episcopacy as hostile to civil as well as religious liberty. When the war really broke out many of the clergy had to fiee, others were persecuted and imprisoned, churches were closed, many of them desecrated and defiled by the mob.

    In 1790 Rev. Truman Marsh was stationed at New Milford and remained for nine years, and it is probable he looked after the church in Kent. In February, 1808, the parish was duly organized according to the state laws, the first officers being Lewis St. John, clerk; Reuben Booth, moderator; John Smith, treasurer. In May following Rev. Sturgis Gilbert was offered $6 to preach every third Sunday during the summer. May 4, 1809, a meeting was called to see whether the society would adopt the constitution of the church in America as set forth by general convention. From 1808 to 1816 yearly meetings were held on the great plain of Kent as it was then called. In the latter year the old church was renovated. In September Mr. Gilbert was released from his contract. The records are broken from here until 1819, when in April of that year at the annual meeting the committee of the church were authorized to lay out the present subscriptions lately obtained in hiring, as it was said, Rev. George B. Andrews to officiate as clergyman. Under him the old church which had been built nearly fifty- two years in 1820 was consecrated. Mr. Andrews immediately afterward set to work to build the present edifice. On September 30, 1822, a meeting was called to adopt plans for building. Jeremiah Fuller, John H. Swift, Garrett Winegar, Alpheus Fuller, and John Hurd, were chosen as a building committee. The original papers, contracts, etc., are still preserved. Various subscription papers tell of the struggles of the faithful few to get the church built. Those who had no money to give gave of their goods, timber, stone, brick, or lime, anything in short, that would prove available as building,

    M. E. CHURCH AT GAYLORDSV1LLE.

    Many of the people in the southern part of the town are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church in Gaylordsville, and that church must not be overlooked in enumerating the religious forces of the town. For many years it has maintained regular preaching services at Ore Hill and Bulls Bridge. Situated at the Center, as the churches are, there are many who find it difficult to reach them, and the neighborhood Sunday schools at South Kent, Bulls Bridge, Macedonia, and North Keat have been, and are, of inestimable value.

    Mention should here be made of Rev. Wm. H. Kirk, a consecrated Reformed Methodist minister, who was for fifty-one years a resident of tho town of Kent. He was born of Scottish parentage in Springfield, Vermont, March 24, 1824. His mother was a lineal descendant of Robert Bruce, the eminent Scottish chief, and a daughter of Rev. Rufus Bruce of Chester, Vermont. Mr. Kirk was converted to Christ at the age of ten years, and for sixty-one years was a devout Christian. He edited for several years the denominational paper of his church, which was published under the name of "The Banner and Banquet." His church granted him license as an exhorter at the age of seventeen years and in 1844, at a sitting of the Vermont annual conference of the Reformed Methodist church he was ordained an elder in said church, which office he held until his death on February 19, 1896, at Kent. He was always under appointment by his conference as pastor, visiting elder or evangelist, in which capacity he labored faithfully and successfully in different states in the Union. Mr. Kirk was an anti-slavery man during the days of slavery, and was one of the only three men in the town of Kent to vote the anti-slavery ticket when that ticket was first presented to the people, the other two being the late Rev. Jeremiah Fry and the late Deacon Lewis Spooner. He thereafter voted with the Republican party until the excitement of war times began to subside when it was discovered that the greatest foe to our race was the liquor traffic. Accordingly, he identified himself with the Prohibition party. Possessing great strength of character and independence of thought, he was never misunderstood as to his sentiments. He was the champion of every cause and measure that tended to suppress vice and exalt virtue. Sympathetic and kind towards the suffering and distressed, he was often called to comfort bereaved ones in officiating at funerals until he had attended one thousand during his ministry He took a Christian interest In the welfare of the Scatacook Indians and many of them, under his influence became Christians. The oldest remaining members of the tribe declare him to have been the first person to visit their reservation and tell them they "had souls and might have a Saviour." January 12, 1845, he was married to Miss Maria Houghton of Pownall. Vermont. Their three children were: Sarah A., wife of Edward Eaton, of Warren; Laura J., wife of Edward Thorpe, and a resident of Danvers, Mass., and Charles F., who married Miss Lillian Newton, and resides in Kent.

    While of a social nature, of Mr. Kirk it could be truly said he feared God, and feared nothing else but sin. Eminently successful as a revivalist, many of the members of different churches in and around Kent were converted under his labors and teaching. For a period of more than three years previous to his death he was an invalid, suffering from a partial paralysis and other diseases.

    In 1757, Jabez Smith was chosen overseer of the tribe; being the first officer of the kind appointed for the Scatacooks.

    History of Kent, Connecticut: Including Biographical Sketches of ... - Google Books Result by Francis Atwater - 1897 - Reference - 176 pages
    1777— Ephraim Hubbell, Captain Justus Sackett, Captain Jethro Hatch. ... Carter, Captain Jedediah Hubbell. 1779— Major Jethro Hatch, Captain Justus Sackett, ...
    books.google.com/books?id=swgWAAAAYAAJ... -

    Yes, its in Washington not Warren. The confusion is sometimes based on the fact that Warren has no post office and shares 3 with neighboring towns. Therefore, we are the only town on Ct without a zip code! We use Kent, Cornwall bridge 06754 and New Prestons 06777.
    The "origin" on New Preston? Well Washington township incorporated in 1779. It was the last township on Lake Waramug to be incorporated. Assembled from a patchwork of properties from Kent, New Milford, the Woodbury township and Litchfield. Prior to that the surrounding lands were American Indian owned by local tribes such as The Pomperaugs, Bantams, Schaghticokes, Weantinokes and Potatucks. They banded together for protection from the Mohawks on NY. Chief Waramaug (died 1735) was the major political power. As whites settled in the area, the band of tribes welcomed them as security and protection from the Mohawks. There were no battles over land transactions to the Europeans. In 1710, the Woodbury north purchase included much of what in now the town of washington and the New Preston village. Six years later was the Fairweather purchase just west of the lake. Real estate transactions became rampant, as did townships and speculators.
    The town of Washington became the 5th town in the nation to be named in honor of the 1st President. During the war, Washington stopped in New Preston village once. May 26th, 1781.. Im not dating myself! He had breakfast at Squire Cogswells place which is still located on Christian St. Actually the place exist as a private residence.
    I hope this helps

    KENT'S FIRST IRON WORKS

    Kent's fascination with iron began with the very settling of the town. Lots of the First Division were auctioned at Windham in March of 1738. By September of that year a Town Meeting was held at the home of Ebenezer Barnum, a Kent Proprietor. This was located in North Kent on the twelve rod highway, Kent's Main Street, two lots below Nathaniel Berry's farm which is on the west side of the highway at the corner of the old road to the North Kent Bridge where we now go to the dump.

    This Town Meeting, among other things, voted to lay out the town's second highway, "at the foot of the mountain (Cobble Hill's south end) to continue up the notch (1989 past Walker's) to the foot of the 'eight lots' so-called, eight rods between twelve rods to the Iron Pots."

    Ebenezer Barnum came from Danbury and he may have known that the Ore Bed was open. As early as May 1738, at the second Town Meeting it was voted "that Ebenezer Barnum shall take the 49th lot or share in the First Division on condition that he build a sawmill by the last of December next and also a grist mill in two years." This lot was way to the south of his homesite and he turned back this offer to the town. Instead he bought the lot in Flanders now occupied by the Kennedy's and put his grist mill on the east side of Cobble Brook north and across from the sawmill his neighbor Jonathan Morgan had built earlier on the next lot to the south.

    Across the highway and south of Barnum's homesite in North Kent when the Second Division of lots was drawn in 1739, a road was opened up East Mountain to the ridge (Botsford Road), then straight south past the west side of North Spectacle Pond to the Fairweather Purchase on the New Milford border. By 1744, Ebenezer must have explored this road and the North Spectacle area and seen its possibilities for an Iron Works, for he bought two lots in the Second Division on the west side of the pond. He must have presented a plan to the Town Fathers for at a Town Meeting in that year, 1744, it was voted "Ebenezer Barnum may lay out six acres for the convenience of making an Iron Works dam and that Ebenezer Barnum may lay out four acres more for an Iron Works." This location was at the outlet of North Spectacle Pond, the northeast side of the pond and this ten acre unit appears in all deeds pertaining to the Iron Works from 1744 through to the end of Morgan's Forge in 1867.

    Barnum sold his grist mill in Flanders to Jonathan Rowley, and set up the Iron Works as a family operation with his sons, Gideon, Ebenezer, Jr., and Richard. They were able to get a plant started. It was an early form of ironworks able to turn out bar iron (pig iron) for the local blacksmiths, forges, and puddling works. It never became a blast furnace…

    kent hst soc

    The Iron Industry in Kent

    Excerpts from our Kent Tales volume, Iron Fever, which is available from our Gift Shop for $10.

    KENT'S FIRST IRON WORKS

    Kent's fascination with iron began with the very settling of the town. Lots of the First Division were auctioned at Windham in March of 1738. By September of that year a Town Meeting was held at the home of Ebenezer Barnum, a Kent Proprietor. This was located in North Kent on the twelve rod highway, Kent's Main Street, two lots below Nathaniel Berry's farm which is on the west side of the highway at the corner of the old road to the North Kent Bridge where we now go to the dump.

    This Town Meeting, among other things, voted to lay out the town's second highway, "at the foot of the mountain (Cobble Hill's south end) to continue up the notch (1989 past Walker's) to the foot of the 'eight lots' so-called, eight rods between twelve rods to the Iron Pots."

    Ebenezer Barnum came from Danbury and he may have known that the Ore Bed was open. As early as May 1738, at the second Town Meeting it was voted "that Ebenezer Barnum shall take the 49th lot or share in the First Division on condition that he build a sawmill by the last of December next and also a grist mill in two years." This lot was way to the south of his homesite and he turned back this offer to the town. Instead he bought the lot in Flanders now occupied by the Kennedy's and put his grist mill on the east side of Cobble Brook north and across from the sawmill his neighbor Jonathan Morgan had built earlier on the next lot to the south.

    Across the highway and south of Barnum's homesite in North Kent when the Second Division of lots was drawn in 1739, a road was opened up East Mountain to the ridge (Botsford Road), then straight south past the west side of North Spectacle Pond to the Fairweather Purchase on the New Milford border. By 1744, Ebenezer must have explored this road and the North Spectacle area and seen its possibilities for an Iron Works, for he bought two lots in the Second Division on the west side of the pond. He must have presented a plan to the Town Fathers for at a Town Meeting in that year, 1744, it was voted "Ebenezer Barnum may lay out six acres for the convenience of making an Iron Works dam and that Ebenezer Barnum may lay out four acres more for an Iron Works." This location was at the outlet of North Spectacle Pond, the northeast side of the pond and this ten acre unit appears in all deeds pertaining to the Iron Works from 1744 through to the end of Morgan's Forge in 1867.

    Barnum sold his grist mill in Flanders to Jonathan Rowley, and set up the Iron Works as a family operation with his sons, Gideon, Ebenezer, Jr., and Richard. They were able to get a plant started. It was an early form of ironworks able to turn out bar iron (pig iron) for the local blacksmiths, forges, and puddling works. It never became a blast furnace…

    MACEDONIA'S FORGES AND MILLS

    Mills and forges below the gorge on Macedonia Brook began much earlier than has generally been realized. Water coming from the Nodine Hollow Brook, joined by the Fuller or Pond Mountain Brook forming the Macedonia Brook was harnessed to provide power.

    Following the auction of the First Division of lots in Kent in 1738, starting the development of the town, the division and sale of lots continued in a fairly orderly fashion through the tenth division 1771-3. These lots on the east side of the river formed the town, contributed taxes and were under the supervision of the Town Fathers.

    Across the river were the Country Lands or Colony Lands, not part of the town, and a few people had settled there before Kent was started. These lands, some 11,000 acres caught the eyes of a number of men who felt there was desirable land to acquire easily, without obligation to the town for taxes or regulation, and with few people having much knowledge of what was available and what it might offer. Joseph Fuller and Joseph Lasell, original Kent Proprietors, were the first to be tempted by the west bank of the river. They staked out large tracts of land and appealed to the General Assembly for approval of grants, disguising the amount of land involved and presenting themselves as hard-pressed farmers. The legislature was skeptical of their claims and reduced their acreage considerably.

    Moses Rowley (or Rowlee) of Sharon must have had some information as to what the land offered, for he acquired almost the whole of Macedonia in a fairly legitimate fashion. At least he paid someone for what he acquired.

    February 19, 1743-4, he bought a tract of land from Samuel and Rebecca Algur for 30 pounds containing a small dwelling, called the Algur "home lot" which Obadiah Hawley of Stratford had given to Rebecca Algur (his daughter) by deed executed April 17, 1732, recorded in the first book of Records of Sharon. (1)

    In addition, on the same date, for 700 pounds in bills of credit old tenor, Rowley bought from Samuel Algur "1/2 part of the land Samuel Algur and William Castle bought of Joseph and William Hart of Farmington November 17, 1739, before Joseph Hooker, Justice of the Peace." (2)

    On the first map of Kent the Algur Grant is shown on the west side of our Kent Bridge. It follows the road northwest and along the ridge of the mountain on the north side of the road about three quarters of the way to Eads corner. (1989)

    Five years later, May 10, 1748, Rowley added a very large tract purchased from Robert Watson of Stratford. This joined the Algur tract on the south, went to the "York Line on the west, up Fuller Mt. road to the crest of the hill then again west to the York Line." This covered a large chunk at the beginning of what is Macedonia Park and included the gorge of the Macedonia Brook. (3)

    This large tract Robert Watson of Stratford had acquired with Benjamin Hollister and Henry Stevenson the month before, April of 1748, for 200 pounds with a lease for 999 years from Captain Maheu, Keft Sawmill Cokenes, Jobe Mahew, John Anteney, Thomas Suknes, and John Sokenes, Indians of Nodine Hollow. (4)

    Watching the haphazard acquisition of the Colony Lands, the townspeople of Kent, anxious to have control of the area for sale and town support, as Charles Grant surmises, appealed to the General Assembly to be allowed to annex the lands. (5)

    "With some perspicacity, the General Assembly, studying the situation, ordered that the land be annexed to the town only with reference to town privileges and without passing the fee thereby." This measure was passed in 1743. The lands were not surveyed until 1752 when Roger Sherman was appointed surveyor by the General Assembly. He and two chairmen took seventeen days to divide the 11,000 acres into 28 lots. Then an Act of 1853 ordered the sale of these lots at auction. Somehow Moses Rowley's land was missed in the survey and (his land) was not sold with the rest in 1753-54. (6)

    At first Rowley probably used the Algur house, but after the 1748 land purchase, according to later deeds, he built a house and sawmill on the south side of the road on what is now the Preston Mountain Brook. Later in 1788, this was the site of the Converse forge. There's no record of Rowley having a forge there.

    "In 1769 he received an eviction order and petitioned plaintively against it. His memorial to the General Assembly pleads that Watson had purchased the land of the Nodines, April of 1748. He had entered upon and made improvements and built a sawmill supposing he had good title and other buildings." (7)

    A committee investigated and satisfied itself that what Rowley alleged was true. They recommended that he receive a grant to include his sawmill. The General Assembly approved and the grant was formalized in 1769. Moses had further trouble. In 1771, it was charged that he had deceived the Assembly and that the land granted him had been represented to be small in comparison to what it really was. After two more investigations, Moses was ordered to appear in New Haven 'to say why the grant should not be declared void.' Moses admitted to 900 acres. If this was smaller than the actual land claimed he was really gambling on obscurity. The General Assembly records show no disposition of the case but Kent Records show he became a public charge so that the grant probably had been rescinded. (8)

    "Whereas the subscribers, selectmen of the town of Kent have inspected into the affairs of Moses Rowlee of Kent and find he is guilty of poor husbandry and mismanagement in his business and is thereby in great damage of wasting his estate, we do therefor appoint Abraham Fuller to be overseer over said Moses Rowlee to order and direct him in the management of his business until the selectmen of Kent aforesaid shall give further order.

    Justice of the Peace
    Feb. 25, 1771
    Town Clerk's Office Kent

    Just previous to this problem with the Assembly, Moses had sold 150 acres to Peter Pratt, July 2, 1770. This tract included the gorge with the waterpower of Macedonia Brook with extensive acreage up to the top of Fuller Mountain. Pratt held this for three years and apparently started an iron works on the brook. He sold the property to Hendrik Winegar of Amenia Union in Dutchess County, New York in 1773. (Winegar had built the big brick house still standing in Amenia and had a large farm there. The family had originally come from the German Palatinate, expelled by the king and helped by Queen Anne of England to this country, they settled in Northeast and Germantown in New York State. They were millers and ironworkers as well as farmers.) (9)

    Two years later Hendrik Winegar (1775), sold the piece now recorded as 130 acres (maybe the "more or less" terminology was at work) bought of Peter Pratt with Ironworks and coal house and grist mill building on the premises. This is the first mention of Ironworks in deeds pertaining to the tract. It indicates that the ironworks was well established. (10)…

    THE KENT IRON MANUFACTURING COMPANY

    In the early 1800s the iron industry never lacked for investors. Several locations in Kent offered tempting opportunities. With ponds, brooks, falls, and high grade ore nearby, also rocks, sand, line and charcoal, and a hill sloping from the road to the furnace site, requisites listed by Howell and Carlson in Empire over the Dam, Kent had several good locations available. With Kent Furnace, operated by Stuart, Hopson and Eaton, located on the Housatonic in Flanders, Bull's Bridge operated by a series of owners, the Macedonia Brook site had an active iron works and seemed ideal for a third blast furnace.

    In 1816, Rufus Fuller came to Kent from Plymouth, Connecticut. He bought a 1/3 share of Carter's Forge in South Kent from Stephen Sergent November 17, 1817. (1) His brother Alpheus had come from Dover, New York in 1808 buying from John Payne the first 1/3 of Carter's Forge on the outlet of Hatch Pond, "utensils, coal house and privileges, 1/3 right to the stream where the forge stands and pond called Hatch, 1/3 right in lowering same and crossing John Hopson's land for the purpose." (2) With Jabez Beardsley he bought another 1/3 from Asaph Swift October 12, 1804. (3) With Rufus's purchase control of Carter's Forge was with the Fullers. They operated a puddling works on the outlet of the Hatch Pond brook. This site now belongs to Harold Bilby. (1989)

    Rufus Fuller, in 1816, began to operate the Ore Bed store. He was active in selling ore and was agent for the owners of the South Kent Ore Bed. With the development of blast furnaces in 1824, he became interested in the possibilities for a furnace at Macedonia and enlisted the support of two men, investors in the Ore Bed, in the new project.

    In 1824, Samuel W. Johnson, who had taken over from his father, William Samuel Johnson, his interests in the Kent Ore Bed and furnaces in the Kent area, and John Adam of Canaan, also an investor in the Bed, as well as the Canaan and Salisbury iron business, joined Rufus in subscribing $500 each to begin the Kent Iron Manufacturing Company. Rufus was made agent for this company. His first acquisition was the Wilson Iron Works located below the gorge on the Macedonia Brook. (4)

    Starting with the purchase from John Wilson and the heirs and partners of Ambrose Wilson with land, buildings and water privileges, including the damming of the outlet of Fuller Pond, by October 25, 1824, he had control of an ideal location for his furnace. For this he was to pay $1,115, one half to be paid April 1, 1826 and one half on April 1, 1827, with interest. This transaction was recorded February 22, 1825. On March 27, 1825, he paid $700 on this deal for the property. (5)

    November 2, 1824, Asa Parks received $20 from the President and Directors of the Kent Iron Manufacturing Company for 1/2 acre bound east on Winegar's Forge Pond and Parks land, north on land formerly of Robert Wilson, west on the highway, south to a point near said Pond. (In 1987 this would have been on the property north of the stone house. The old road ran directly in front of the house and the pond was across the road directly in front of the house. The property was owned then by Zachariah Winegar and his forge was further down the brook where the Preston Mountain brook joins the Macedonia Brook.) (6)

    Rufus followed this purchase with a series of deals, acquiring all the land adjacent to the Wilson Forge. July 14, 1825, 26 acres were acquired, "land on which the new Furnace now stands, land which Robert Wilson received from his father Ambrose's estate, and an additional ten acres Robert Wilson had purchased of John Wilson, Benjamin Chickens, and Abraham Rice. (7)

    March 11, 1826, 141 acres, reaching to the New York border were bought from Alpheus Fuller and Nathaniel Perry for $1200. An important piece was added from Phoebe Converse in the purchase of 1/5 part of about an acre adjoining Fuller Pond with privilege of damming said pond. These purchases gave control of the land around the two brooks north of the gorge above the furnace site. (8)

    October 20, 1824, Fuller wrote Samuel W. Johnson of Stratford that he had gone the day before to the "raising of the Cole House, 30 by 60 feet, a large building. They have built the dam at the outlet of Fuller's Pond so-called and are tearing away the rocks and stones and leveling the ground for the foundation for the furnace, have built the raceway out nigh of the brook and are leveling up to make a large platform to deposit pigs on. It begins to look like a new place. They are expecting the man everyday to come to lay the stack." (9)

    He wrote also that he "had forgot to inform that the directors appointed the first of November for our first installment to be paid in of $100 on a share. I told Esq. Perry I was calculating to write and inform you and forgot to do it. Shall expect to have the pleasure of waiting on you at the Ore Hill the first Wednesday in November. Esq. Adam has not been to the hill since you were here."

    On December 10, 1824, Samuel Johnson had received a letter from I.M. Woolsey of New York with advice about the type of blower to be installed. "I have not until this day been in possession of the information requisite to answer your letter respecting the proper kind of blower for the Macedonia Furnace. Of the different kinds of which I have had descriptions the two following appear the best. First, an iron cylinder similar to the one used by the West Point foundry at Cold Spring. The West Point Company offer to construct a cylinder of 30 inches diameter and four feet stroke, to make a double stroke (that is to throw out as much air on the return as on the forward stroke) complete - viz cylinder, bottom, top valves, piston, and piston rod - for $800. This appears high but without a draught of it I cannot obtain estimates of other founders. It might be geared to strike any number of strokes in a minute. If 25 it would discharge 425 cubic feet of air in a minute. (10)

    "Second, a wooden blower as used by McQueen in his furnace in New Jersey, with two cylinders of which I send you a draught. This is drawn for a 5 feet cylinder and four feet stroke and striking four times a minute to each cylinder would discharge 628 feet of air per minute. Constructed as drawn on the plan it would cost $250 exclusive of the water wheel. It might with advantage be geared with a crank instead of a stirrup but would require in such case two or more additional cog wheels which would enhance the cost considerably.

    "Neither of these estimates embrace the cost of a regulating receiver which is very necessary in my opinion, in either case. I presume a wooded cylinder would not sustain a pressure much more than 4 strokes per minute.

    "The more I reflect upon the subject the more I am convinced that the proposed dimensions of the furnace are too small. All practical men with whom I have conversed recommend at least 40 feet in height and the diameter of the boshes in proportion.

    "In consequence of the rise of England iron the best iron cannot be imported for less than $55 and will next year be scarce and high. Should the Macedonia iron prove of good quality I shall not find any difficulty in disposing of all they can furnish."

    The Furnace opened in 1826 as a warm blast operation. With the promise of such a good market for its production it would seem to be set for success. No records of its operation have come to light so far but tradition has it that it was constantly beset with problems. Perhaps the final stack was too small. However, there seems to have been money for land purchases (almost a mania with the Fullers). (11)

    In 1827, March 7th, the Kent Iron Works completed its purchase of the Wilson Forge property by buying for $250, "four shares, 1/4 each from Zacariah Winegar, and Garret Winegar, Asa Parks and Harvey Smith, a little north of the gristmill including land, water privileges, coalhouse, and tools, blacksmith shop standing on or near the opposite side of the highway (west) from said forge and 1/4 of its tools.

    Although the previous purchase gave control of the land around Wilson's Forge and its water power, now the site of the new furnace, land purchases by the Kent Manufacturing Company continued.

    Acreage on the Sharon line and Fuller Mountain from Samuel Fuller, March 24, 1828. This might have been for charcoal as there are old pits all over this area. (12)

    One hundred acres from Benjamin Davis of Amenia, March 4, 1830, bounded north by Samuel Beecher, east by the state of New York (from Fuller Mountain Road west to New York state and also more New York state and Nodine land). (13)

    April 15, 1828, from Erastus Chamberlain, a place in Macedonia with buildings, north on Zacariah and Garret Winegar, west on Garret, south on Dimmon and Hiram Converse, more Fuller Mountain land. (14)

    Previously, March 1827, they had bought out the Winegars right to dam Fuller Pond, though the deed was not recorded earlier. (15)

    May 6, 1831, they leased for three years "a dwelling and garden where David Nodine now lives with the privilege during said term to repair and build an addition to said house." This plot was bounded on the south by Zacariah Winegar, east on the highway, north and west by Garret Winegar. (16)

    December 6, 1831, a small dwelling west of the highway, adjacent to road leading from Levi Stone's through Nodine Hollow neighborhood (so-called) was bought from Philetus Winegar for $150 adjacent to company lands. (17)

    Rufus Fuller on July 3, 1832, sold the Kent Iron Manufacturing Company, ten acres where he previously lived (with buildings, the same piece I purchased of William and Polly Davidson and Abigail and John Wilson) where Samuel Brenton now lives. At this time he moved back to town buying the Swift house in the middle of town. (18)

    Other purchases included an acre and five rods near Fuller Pond for $20 on January 8, 1833, west of the pond. (19) Ten acres on top of the hill near Simon Beecher from Milton Brown, January 28, 1834. (20)

    From David Nodine, March 14, 1835, two acres in Nodine Hollow conveyed to Mary Nodine by Thomas Barlow for $40. (21) Finally, May 25, 1835, 50 acres were purchased from Hiram Converse for $250 bounded south on Amasa Leonard, east on Philetus Winegar, north on Ambrose Wilson, west on Hiram and Simon Converse heirs. (22)

    NOTE: All this land in Macedonia around the Furnace and on Fuller Mountain and across the mountain to New York State would be purchased later by Rufus Fuller, Jr. for the White Family who gave it to the State for Macedonia Park…

    …Samuel W. Johnson must have had faith that the business could be made to operate successfully for he bought the assets of the company on September 2, 1842, "at a Director's Meeting duly held at the Counting House, Charles Edwards as Secretary was empowered to sell to Samuel W. Johnson for $8,000 all parcels and tracts of land and all the buildings and furnaces, forges and iron works, water privileges and real estate embraced and contained in a mortgage deed to Phoenix Bank of Hartford dated April 4, 1839." (30)

    Two years later, October 22, 1844, Samuel W. Johnson turned the Macedonia Furnace property, three dwellings, furnace forge, coal house and blacksmith shop and other buildings, 80 acres, also two acres with puddling forge, wood and coal house and the outlet of Fuller Pond and water privileges to his son Edward Johnson. (31) The same day Edward borrowed $509 from his father with the furnace as collateral. (32)…

    ... Still standing at the entry of Macedonia Park is the remnant of the stack of the furnace on the edge of the brook below the gorge. The steam from the vent from the furnace shows its stone framework on the upper level of land across the highway on the west side, and the sides of the big dam below the furnace show clearly on the brook above the bridge to Fuller Mountain. The mill house, frame, sawmill, gristmill and cider mill, last operated by Ebers Peters stands across from the stone house now owned by the Levines (1990).

    The final episode in the life of the furnace was told by Sherm Chase. At the time of World War I metal of all kinds was in great demand and everything that could be used was salvaged. The huge iron shaft that drove the water wheel at the furnace was still lying beside the brook. Ten to twelve feet long it took two teams of heavy work horses to drag it up the hill to load it on a truck and carry it away.

    IRONWORKS AT BULL'S BRIDGE

    Hard facts about the ironworks at Bull's Bridge are scarce as no business records have come to light. From the Town's land records, a few letters and court records, the history seems to indicate perpetual optimism and discouragement for a series of ever-hopeful investors. The location on the Housatonic River below a frequently spectacular falls always appeared to promise great possibilities that lured a series of owners to try their hand at the iron business. Hope springs eternally.

    However at a Town Meeting held December 29, 1766, there is a reference showing that an ironworks was functioning there. "Voted that we will do nothing at all less or more tords reparing the Bridge over the Ousatonick River by Captain Johnsons Ironworks nor for lying a road through Capt. Johnsons and Mr. Lewis land from Iron Ore hill to said works."

    December 13, 1756, Kent's Town meeting records show "Isaac Bull of Dover, Duchess Co. New York, shall have the privilege of building a sawmill and ironworks or any other waterworks on the river within the limits of the Fairweather Grant in order said Bull shall begin in two years and pay Kent 30 shillings lawful money." Four sons came to Kent with Isaac to help develop his enterprises, John 24, Jacob 21, Thomas 19, and Abraham 16. His sawmill and gristmill were well known and well established. An ironworks receives no mention. In 1758 the town voted that Isaac could build a house and workshop on the highway that runs by his mills on the Ousatonic River.

    The Early Ironworks

    July of 1762, William Samuel Johnson and his partner David Lewis bought or really mortgaged Isaac's "Mantion House" and mills. The Bulls continued to live there and manage their businesses. William Samuel Johnson of Stratford had bought an interest in the South Kent Orebed in 1755, and was deeply involved in its management. With David Lewis also of Stratford, Johnson bought not only the Bull property but most of the land of the Fairweather Grant which extended east from the river and south of Bull's Bridge Road across the lower end of Kent to the New Milford line and east to Warren. (1)

    Following this, the Land Records of May 24, 1776 record a deed from David Lewis, William Samuel Johnson, and George Chapin of Stratford and Angus Dickinson of New Milford to John Hamilton "covering all my Estate," bringing a shift in ownership.

    Later records indicate that David Lewis as Johnson's partner had been active in the operation of an ironworks. May 27, 1776 a deed is recorded that shows the Bull's Falls Ironworks had been developed by the partners. This deed transfers to Lewis from Johnson the ironworks, gristmill and sawmill and several houses, a total of 1300 acres and indicates that Lewis had been actively managing the ironworks. (2)

    David Lewis must have died suddenly as a deed the following year dated May 2, 1777 from his estate returns the property of "Johnson and Lewis as Tenants in common, land on and adjoining the Ousatonic Ironworks and several dwelling houses, 1300 acres including land of Jacob Bull mortgaged to William Samuel Johnson." (3)

    A deed of an earlier date, February 14, 1776, records a name change for the Ironworks. (4)

    "Mr. Hubbel, Sir

    As Mr Lewis (deceased) part of the works is purchases by Mr. John Hamilton and whereas the Ironworks has been called by the name of Bull's Ironworks hitherto, we do think it proper to have the said works entered on your books of Record called by the name of Carron Ironworks as all the accounts hereafter will be kept under the title." Another deed in May 1776, transfers to John Hamilton from David Lewis, William Samuel Johnson, George Chapin, of Stratford and Angus Dickinson of New Milford, "all my estate." This is the only time the name of Carron appears in any available records. The deeds do show that the ironworks was well established under Lewis.

    Over the years the property of the ironworks extended considerably beyond the location of the works itself. The operating area of the enterprise was the 40 acres located on the east side of the river from the southeast corner of Bull's Bridge and bounded north on the turnpike to Litchfield. This 40 acres appears as a unit in all transactions relating to the furnace. Supplementary land was needed to support the teams of oxen used by the company as well as to provide quarters for some of the operators and was acquired periodically. A total of 1300 acres appears in some deeds.

    For some reason the settling of David Lewis' estate seems to have been long and drawn out. On April 14, 1790 David Nichols purchased 40 acres, the furnace core, from the state of David Lewis. His purchase of the furnace property might indicate he intended to work it. June 28, 1790 Robert Charles Johnson, a son of William Samuel, bought 40 acres from the estate of David Lewis. He kept his interest in the Ironworks until September 9, 1794 when he sold it back to his father William Samuel Johnson. The working relationship between Nichols and Robert Charles is nowhere defined. (5)

    In 1791 the two deeds may mean that David Nichols died. Anne Nichols and Lewis Nichols (wife and son?) each bought or received from David parts of the David Lewis estate. There is no information as to how the furnace operated or by whom. (6)

    Four years later in three deeds dated December 3, 1795 is recorded the same by Lewis Nichols of 61 acres, 12 acres and Bull's Ironworks to Catherine and Pixley Judson of Stratford, the entire property around the Ironworks. (7)

    The Judsons kept the property for four years until April 20, 1799 when Gilead Hurd bought half of "the whole piece (consists) of 108 acres" near Bull's Falls from Catherine and Pixley Judson of Stratford for $950. (80)

    The Hurds of Newtown had a long interest in the iron business. Joseph Hurd was one of the original investors in the South Kent Orebed. John Hurd who may have been Gilead's father had considerable farmland in the Bull's Bridge area. The Hurds stayed involved in the iron business longer than most of the investors.

    Ten years later, in 1809 (9) Tallman Chamberlain of Kent bought 12 acres near Bull's Falls from the Judsons, and November 1809 added two pieces of 40 acres from Gilead and John Hurd in a series of three deeds, and May 13, 1819 bought from Tallman Chamberlain most of his holdings. (10)

    With only these deeds as guide, there is no information about the operation or production at the furnace. They show continuous activity at the plant but no assurance as to who was involved. With the record of Hurd's continuing involvement it may be they were responsible for its management. Chamberlain's deeds may really be loans as in the earlier records such arrangements are usually recorded as outright deeds and the investor took no part in occupying or managing the property. The only conclusion is that there was sufficient production at Bull's Bridge to keep a number of people willing to put money into the business.

    The Blast Furnace

    With the development in the iron industry of the blast furnace, plans for a change at Bull's Bridge must have been forming, as a new company appears in the records: the Ousatonic Ironworks. April 24, 1826 the Ousatonic Ironworks bought from John Hurd, Phillip Judd, Agent, 5 acres and 36 rods by the river with all the water privileges. 1826 was the year all three Kent blast furnaces opened: Stuart, Hopson & Eaton in Flanders, Rufus Fuller, John Adam & William Samuel Johnson in Macedonia, and the Ousatonic Ironworks at Bull's Bridge.

    Tallman Chamberlain must have built up his holdings and been active in its development, continuing to be part of it for six years until April 2, 1832 when he sold 40 acres, the furnace core and adjacent land to the Ousatonic Ironworks. (11)

    October 23, 1832 the Ousatonic Ironworks, Phillip Judd, Jr, Agent, bought from John Hurd "five acres, all interest I have in waterpower and privileges," bounded North by the highway, East and South by Tallman Chamberlain and West by the river. In October, Judd bought this same piece from the company for $500. The Judd family had a farm on Geer Mt. and were interested in the Orebed which was adjacent to their land and had a nail works on their property. (12)

    By March 21, 1835, Silas Camp of Claverick, Columbia County, New York had become involved in the Ousatonic Ironworks and bought land near Lewis Spooner for the company which he promptly sold to Abel Beach. Soon thereafter, as agent for the company, he bought from Lewis Shays "land and dwelling where Shays now lives" adjacent to the furnace. (13)

    Five years later, apparently dissatisfied with conditions at the works, Camp received a judgment against the Ousatonic Iron Co. on Oct. 1840 for $1764, $67, $34.22: total $1838.79 (14)… …Charles Rufus Hart, writing in 1935 about Connecticut furnaces says, "in 1844 the (Bull's Bridge) furnace operators rebuilt the Bull's Falls Stack to 40 feet high with 16 foot bosh diameter - enormous dimensions for a Connecticut blast furnace." According to him, this second furnace may have been too large for the waterpower afforded by the Housatonic River at this site. (16)…Its original capacity was rated at 3-1/2 tons per day. Had everything corresponded with the size of the stack, the capacity between the two changes would have been twenty tons a day. The Wheelers must have made the change and probably operated the business until the next change in ownership came…

    The Monitor Ironworks

    David Benjamin acquired all the land and equipment formerly owned by the Bull's Falls Ironworks from Samuel Tomlinson, Russell Tomlinson, Stephen Tomlinson and William D. Bishop for $6,500. (22)

    He immediately turned it over to the Monitor Ironworks for $17,000, "all land formerly owned by the iron works…with buildings, machinery, waterpower, and privileges belonging thereto and all the property in Kent, in a deed dated July 22, 1860. (23)

    The formal incorporation of the company appears in New Haven County records dated June 30, 1863. "The undersigned being the President and a majority of the Directors of the Monitor Iron Company, a Joint Stock Company…Certify That the purpose for which it is established is the following,

    "For the manufacture of Iron, the purchase of all Real Estate necessary for the business necessary or convenient for the prosecution of the principal business. The capital stock of said Corporation is Fifty Thousand dollars and is divided into Two Thousand Shares of Twenty Five dollars each.

    Stockholders

    D.A. Benjamin 800 shares
    C.S. Bushnell 500 shares
    F.F. Rowland 500 shares
    Everett Cauder 200 shares

    And we further certify that the amount of Capital stock of said Corporation paid in is Twenty Five pr. cent.

    F.F. Rowland, President ) A majority
    Cornelius F. Bushnell ) of the D.A. Benjamin ) Directors

    The Monitor Ironworks supposedly supplied iron for the famous ship, the Monitor. With no business records to verify it the story must be considered legend. As for all the companies that worked Bull's Falls there must have been some periods of success to make so many men convinced of its potential. Like all others, however, the Monitor Ironworks folded as evidence by the following Probate Records.

    The 1865 Court Records show a claim against the Monitor Ironworks by Cornelius L. Bushnell as indebted to Stephen Tomlinson, Russell Tomlinson, Wm. D. Bishop, Henry Hurd and co-partners Stuart Hopson & Co, for a series of loans totaling $15,500. (24)

    Attachments appearing in the Probate Records against the Monitor Ironworks begin April 18, 1865.

    Henry Scudder, New York City vs Monitor Ironworks at $50.

    April 24, 1865 David Holles vs. Monitor Ironworks I.R.S. Tax $650.

    June 19, 1865. A petition by Asabel Lyons & Ezra Curtis of Bridgeport partners in Lyons & Curtis vs The Monitor Ironworks, a joint stock company jointly indebted to the petitioners in the sum of three hundred dollars.

    Sept. 1865 David & Elisha Parker of Brooklyn, N.Y. for Daniel Parker & Co., $2,600, damages and cost.

    These claims ended activity at Bulls Bridge. The still unanswered question is why the Ironworks was so promising and so unsuccessful. Was it absentee ownership, inexperienced operators, poor location? Even finding business records might not tell.

    The arrival of the railroad drastically altered the face of Kent. Whereas the town center had originally been located in Flanders, about two miles north of the present Main Street, the establishment of the railroad in the flat river valley brought new life to the area formerly known as the "Grate Plain," once used as grazing ground. The lovely Victorian houses that still line Kent's main streets were built as a result of the railroad, and Flanders became a sleepy little hamlet of stately Colonial homes.

    The iron industry waned in the late 1800s, but Kent did not skip a beat. Farming, always practiced on a subsistence level, began to fill the gap left by the iron industry. With the hillsides clearcut by the voracious need for charcoal, dairy farms proliferated, along with tobacco, corn, hay, wheat, rye, chickens, goats, sheep and pigs! There are still a few farms left in town, although nothing like the eighty or ninety that dotted the landscape in the days before the mega-farms and mass transit put them out of business. Population dipped. But this mass transit brought another boon to Kent. The newly arrived trains began to bring a fresh resource to the town - tourists. Not long after that, the invention of the automobile increased access to our area. The "Great Trunk Road," now Rte 7, was built, allowing many city-bound people to escape to the fresh air of the country. The covered bridge at Bulls Bridge gorge and Kent Falls just north of town quickly became new tourist attractions that are still popular today.

    About this time, a scion of Danbury's famous White family, Alain White, began to recognize the threat to the area from all this increased visitation. He and his sister May quietly started buying up land, which they gave to the state for public parks, including both Macedonia and Kent Falls in Kent. Mr. White also donated land in other towns, and eventually established a foundation to preserve his own beloved home in Litchfield - The White Memorial Foundation.

    The bucolic setting of this little rural town with its farm fields and rolling hills captured the attention of a number of talented landscape artists, primarily from New York. According to Robert Michael Austin, author of the recently published Artists of the Litchfield Hills, "Kent attracted the most permanent colony of artists and developed the only artists' organization that survives today." The Kent Art Association celebrated its 80th anniversary in 2004. Its founders included George Laurence Nelson, Robert Nisbet, Spencer Nichols, Willard Paddock, Frederick J. Waugh, Rex Brasher, F. Luis Mora, Eliot Clark, and Floyd Clymer. All these men, along with other friends and family members in the colony, were extremely skilled, highly respected artists whose work is still in great demand.

    Laurence Nelson's 1751 Flanders home now belongs to the Kent Historical Society and is open to the public during the summer. On display are many of his finest works. Also in the house, though rarely on display, are two portraits by an earlier, also famous, local artist - Ammi Phillips. Were it not for Laurence Nelson and his wife Helen's arrival in Kent, Ammi Phillips' identity might never have been known. Helen Nelson was an art critic who had developed a keen eye for her subject. As she began to socialize with area residents, she noted many unsigned portraits, the quality of which quickly attracted her. She recognized them as all being done by the same primitive but talented hand, and set about to discover his identity. She staged an exhibit of his works in Kent, and in the March 1925 issue of International Studio, wrote a fascinating article about the yet unidentified "Border Limner" or "Kent Limner," as Phillips came to be known. Tirelessly promoting his work, through exhibits, speeches, and articles, Helen continued her search for his story, and was soon joined by other detectives. Eventually, a signed painting was discovered, and finally in 1959, Barbara and Lawrence Holdridge were able to conclusively prove his identity. Today, Phillips' portraits are considered to be exquisite examples of early American Primitive art.

    Another artist of world renown was a resident of nearby Warren - Eric Sloane. Sloane left a huge legacy to the town of Kent through his donation of the defunct Kent Iron Manufacturing Company lands to the state of Connecticut for the establishment of a museum there. Through this benevolent gesture to the town he loved, Sloane really managed to tie together many important elements of Kent - the iron industry, farming, art and tourism.

    The Sloane-Stanley Museum grounds are on the site of the Kent Iron Manufacturing complex, the furnace of which has just been restored by the state. The main building of the museum houses Sloane's extraordinary collection of farm tools. His studio from Warren is reconstructed in the building, along with a gallery featuring many of his finest works. The complex itself is arguably the most popular tourist attraction in town, rivaling nearby Kent Falls as a destination for folk from far and wide. From the museum grounds in the heart of old Kent, a visitor may gaze across the Houstaonic to the controversial Western Lands, and then head south to stroll down the Main Street of a quintessential New England town.

    The period from 1756 to 1774 marking the rise in population of Kent to a figure of 1996, nearly the highest point ever attained, was one of hardship. Following the opening up of the "Western Wilderness" of Connecticut, settlers had been pouring in for twenty-five or thirty years from all sides from the towns of Norwalk, Stratford, Tolland, Canterbury, Hebron, Lebanon, Stonington, Colchester and others, although some did not come in until a little after that date.

    There were covered wagons over forest trails by day, and campfires by night to keep the wild beasts at bay. Lonely graves were left along the way, and husky new infants came through triumphantly.

    Roads were gradually being developed, lines of inter-town communication improved. In time tales of growing oppression of the British inflame the restless ambitions of the young men of the second generation, who were perhaps becoming less enamoured of the back-breaking and endless rocks of the beloved "rocks and rills" of their fathers. They could not share the gratified sense of achievement of their parents.

    The declaration of war offered them their opportunity. Many young men left Kent and some of them did not come back. A few were left on the battlefield probably and some, after hasty farewells to their families, pushed on to the west - Pennsylvania, New York State, Ohio, the new wilderness.

    Philetus and John, sons of John and Mary Ransom Swift, went to the Revolutionary War, and then, after fighting the Pennamite Wars, went on into New York State, founding Palmyra, New York. Mrs. Hugh Tyler is descended from Rhoda Payne, the first white child born in Kent (Warren). Rhoda married a Strong, and her son (perhaps it was) "went west." There must have been others. In 1787, Kent severed its political connection with East Greenwich, as well as a part of Washington, and in so doing suffered considerable drop in populations. Miss Agnes Strong, writing the history of Warren, says "it has been somewhat accurately ascertained that 2837 have emigrated from among us in that time." She is referring to the 50 years previous to 1822. Kent figures enter into this before 1787, and probably with the general restlessness of the post-war period, the trend of emigration continued for some years. In 1826 the Kent Furnace was built just above the village, enlarged several times and finally in 1884.

    In 1826, too, the furnace was built at Bulls Bridge. The authority quoted here, Mrs. Laura Newton, makes no mention of the early furnace of Jacob Bull, nor of others, smaller and earlier. At one time some two hundred men were employed in Bulls Bridge with sixty-one children in school. It was a common sight to see 21 ox teams in a procession as they plodded their way through the covered bridge into New York State.

    The story of iron in Kent is much more interesting and detailed. This sketch only attempts to picture the vast numbers of men connected with it as affecting the population.

    Where did they live, these 2001? There are still signs of habitation scattered around the town, communities long since abandoned. Woodinville, on Ore Hill was wiped out in the smallpox epidemic of the 1890's. Alder City on the west bank, at the foot of the old Skiff Mt. road, has one good house where once lived Benny Budnick and Matt Wean, of rattlesnake fame.

    Some seventeen children were ferried across to Flanders School daily, at one time. Now, except for Benny's house, there are only a few overgrown cellar holes. Occasionally in an open field anywhere in the spring you see a flourishing and beautiful lilac bush, a mute sentinel guarding the spot where once lived a happy family with laughing children.

    The railroad came through Kent in the early 1840's bringing a radical change in the iron business. Gone are the long processions of slow ox-carts to Poughkeepsie with the cast iron and returning with the ore. Ore from Salisbury, even from Richmond, Massachusetts was now brought directly to the siding by the Kent Furnace. With the elimination of most of the ox-carts, many of the laborers were perforce laid off, and with their wives and children left Kent to seek a living elsewhere.

    The same railroad brought about the end finally, of the whole iron industry in Kent, when it became no longer possible to compete with the better facilities in Pennsylvania. In 1895, the Kent Furnace shut down, and with the blowing up of the dam, the old iron industry in Kent came to an abrupt and dramatic end. Population continued to drop. About that time, too, the smallpox epidemic took its heavy toll.

    Then, in 1930, we reach the all time low of 1054 persons.

    There are gaps in the above outline that would merit further study. The influence of the railroad is of vast importance. But that does not explain the fact that the downward curve begins some ten or fifteen years earlier. Was there a new wave of "Westward Ho" movement? Did the Gold Rush affect us? The whole tobacco industry flourished during the decline of the 1830-1930 period. Many of us remember those fields of even, healthy and beautiful tobacco plants everywhere, and in the season, not only in the fine well-built barns, but also in every ramshackle shed, if it were well-ventilated, hung the stalks, curing. Many pounds of tobacco were sold from Kent, but the industry seemed to have no effect in checking the decline in populations.

    After 1910, and before 1930, we see a slight recovery. We have a small but healthy influx of Europeans, whose second and now third generations have helped swell the population and have brought new blood. The marked increase after 1930 is partly due to the depression, as some of the city's unemployed found home was a pretty good place to come to. A few years previously, artists and retired professional people began to discover the beauties of Kent, its unspoiled rural character. The State Road brought its advantages. Fresh fruit and vegetables came from the city markets; Eugene Bull and Fred Chase acquired automobiles, the first in town. Many changes have come in these years but make no mistake, Kent has never lost its essential individuality. The newcomers in its society did not change the community. They had to wait for Kent to assimilate them. It used to be said that it took a thirty year probation period for the newcomer to feel accepted. Times move a little faster, now, and too perhaps we are changing our Yankee suspicious nature a little. 1930 to 1950 shows a marked increase and there is no doubt but that 1960 will show a striking improvement. All this has meant a steadily increasing demand for services of all sorts. We have excellent doctors, two first rate dentists. (We need an oculist.) Good hospitals are available. Modern homes are giving more work than they can do to local carpenters, plumbers, electricians, painters and decorators, all of whom do highly professional jobs, and are native sons of Kent, for the most part.

    One sees Kent expanding in the natural course of events; more of the same sort of people, building the same sort of homes, creating more and more employment opportunities, in the healthiest way, sharing the good things of life. Except for disaster and misfortune, there need be no poor in Kent.

    Ann Eliza Hopson, 1950

    This essay is available in our Kent Tales volume Barzillai Slosson's History of Kent and Other Bits of History, which is available from our Gift Shop for $10.

     

    History of Bethlehem society

    "east part of the north purchase-- not divided among proprietors until 1734 remained woodland

    Among the first proprietors -- from the first society (woodbury) came Reuben and Josiah Avered

    1739 allowed to set up minister and school Rev Joseph Bellamy at age 22

    Fall of 1740 Mr. Whitefireld preached through country religion was revived 1750 the "nervous fever prevailed and spread== not enough wel l to take care of the sick and - a mortal distemper carried off 30 persons in the prime of their life.

    1791 Rev Azel Bakus was ordained and settled in Bethlehem.he also "fitted boys for college" teaching latin and greek . later left to become president of hamilton college (1813).

    1787 society incorporated into a town

    Bethlem is a small town, ita average length being four and a half miles, and its breadth four miles. Its population by the census of 1850, was 815. It is almost wholly an agricultural town, its soil being fertile, with little waste land. It has, however, one woolen manufactory, two wagon shops, three saw-mills, one grist-mill, three cider distilleries, one blacksmith's shop, one shoemaker's shop, and three mercantile stores. It also has two churches, a town hall, a flourishing lyceum, two ministers and one physician.

    --------------

    washington

    The present town of Washington is made up of territory taken from the towns of Woodbury, New Milford, Kent, and Litchfield, and is about six miles square. It contains two ecclesiastical societies, Judea and New Preston, though not the whole of the latter is included within the town. Judea society embraces all the territory taken from Woodbury and Litchfield, and constitutes about two-thirds of the extent of the town. But a small portion of this is contributed by Litchfield. New Preston embraces all the territory taken from Kent and New Milford. In both of these societies are Episcopal churches, having houses for religious worship. The first settlement in the town was made in Judea society, in 1734, the year this society and Bethlehem were divided among the proprietors of Woodbury. Joseph Hurlbut was the first settler, and the first framed house was built in 1736. The next settlers after Hurlbut were Increase Moseley, Nathaniel Durkee, John Baker, Friend Weeks, Joseph Gillett and Samuel Pitcher. The first sermon preached in the society was by Isaac Baldwin, of Litchfield, who afterward relinquished his profession, and became the first clerk of the county court for Litchfield county

    Five years later, the inhabitants had become more numerous, and twenty persons preferred a memorial to the General Assembly, at its May session, 1739, representing that they lived " full eight miles from the Meeting House," and that their wives and children had " to . tarry at home from the worship of God about half of the year," and therefore they pray for " liberty to have preaching six months in the winter," and to be released from paying taxes for a new school-house just built in the first society, and also from parish taxes, that they may build a school-house of their own. The privilege asked for was granted, to continue two years, and they were released from one-half of the parish taxes, and from taxes to build a new meeting-house, provided they were " in no ways Active in the Affair of Building a new Meeting House in said first Society."1 At the October session, 1741, twenty-six individuals petitioned to be incorporated into an ecclesiastical society, and appointed " Our Trusty and well-beloved friend, Friend Weeks, agent and attorney to prosecute our Petition." The petition was signed by Nathaniel Durkee, John Baker, Joseph Gillett, Joseph Chittenden, Elisha Stone, Samuel Pitcher, Jr., James Pitcher, Increase Moseley, Lemuel Baker, Daniel Castle, Samuel Branton, Ezra Terrill, Jr., Ebenezer Allen, Zadock Clark, Elijah Hurd, Joseph Hurd, Joseph Hurlbut, Benjamin Ingraham, Jr., Robert Durkee, Samuel Bell, Jonah Titus, Benjamin Ingraham, John Royce, John Hurd, Jr., Jedediah Hurd, Benjamin Hinman
    non-resident owners will not sell to settlers.

    till the troubles arose which involved the country in the war of the Revolution. The unhappy divisions in this society then arose to a high pitch. Almost the entire people became dissatisfied with their minister, though no heresy nor scandal was alleged against him. This contention finally ceased, after which Mr. Brinsmads was much respected till his death,

    December, 1795, Rev. Ebenezer Porter came here and preached the greater part of the time till his ordination Sept. 7, 1796 Dr. Porter was dismissed from his pastoral charge, Dec. 18,1811, having been elected Professor of Andover Theological Seminary.-not far from the so-called ' Athens of America."

    In 1753, a putrid fever prevailed in this society, of which twenty or thirty died in six months. In 1776, the dysentery prevailed with great mortality. About thirty persons were swept away by it to the grave. During the preceding year, not a single death occurred, and for the last twenty years preceding 1812, the average mortality in the society was but about one per cent, of the population per annum.

    During the first seventy years after the establishment of the church, the people of Judea were uniformly prosperous and happy. They were never divided—never split into sects—but deservedly acquired the reputation of being industrious, orderly and harmonious, with but one exception. The exception alluded to, was during the last ten years of Mr. Brinsmade's ministrations, from 1774 to 1784. This was a contention concerning the half-way covenant system, and it is worthy of notice, that during this whole period of ten years, but three members were added to the church. Thus do contentions, even for just causes, ever diminish the prosperity of the church.

    There have been several revivals, by which considerable numbers were added to the church, as follows: fifty-four in 1804; twenty in 1816; fifty-eight in 1821 ; twenty-nine in 1825; twenty-two in 1827 ; and one hundred and thirty-one in 1831.

    n October, 1748, eleven persons dwelling in the south-eastern part of Kent, and nine living in the north-eastern part of New Milford, petitioned the General Assembly for liberty to hire a minister six months in the year, on the ground of their living " from seven to ten miles from their places of worship in New Milford and Kent." This request was granted, to continue four years, with exemption from parish rates. Before the end of the four years, in May, 1752, forty- one individuals petitioned for a new ecclesiastical society. Their names were Samuel Averill, Caleb Rude, Samuel Lake, Moses Averill, Henry Davis, Jehiel Murray, Isaac Averill, Joseph Carey, John Guthrie, Daniel Averill, Zebulon Palmer, Jacob Kinne, Samuel Cogswell, Thomas Hodgship, Thos. Morris, Benj. Darling, Samuel Waller, Nathaniel Deuine, Enoch Whjttlesey, Joseph Jons, Stephen Bosworth, Thomas Beeman, John Benedict, Stephen Noble, Gilead Sperry, Elnathan Curtis, John Bostwick, Benajah Bostwick, Matthew Beale, John Cogswell, Zephaniah Branch, Edward Cogswell, Emerson Cogswell, Josiah Cogswell, James Terrill, Joseph Miles, Nathan Hawley, Samuel Cogswell, John Cobb, Benjamin Capuen.

    At the same session, sixteen persons of East Greenwich, (now Warren,) remonstrated against the incorporation of a new society, stating that their society had lost " thirty-five rateable persons, and £1467 on their list," and that they therefore protest against having any part of their society cut off, as no families can be spared. Kent, at the same time, passed a vote, that this statement was true. New Milford also sent a committee to oppose the application, and it failed. In October, 1753, thirty-nine persons "in the Northern part of New Milford, and the South and South East part of Kent, and a place Called Merry-all," renewed the application for an ecclesiastical society, which was granted, and the society called New Preston, with the following boundaries :

    " Beginning at the South east corner of New Milford North Purchase, then tunning Southwardly joining upon Woodbury line one mile, from thence running a West line to ye part of the Long Mountain, South West of Capt. Bastwick's farm, then a Northline to the place called the Rockhorse Cobble, and so that course to Merryall line, and then across Merryall to Kent line, and then Running East to the South West corner of James Lake's farm North Easterly to the North West corner of John Henderson's farm, that he now lives on, then running East to East Greenwich line, then running South to y« South West corner of East Greenwich line to Sheppauge river, then running Southwardly upon s<l river to Woodbury Ijne, then running Westwardly on Woodbury line to y« first mentioned bounds," <kc.

    The first meeting of the society was held at the house of Jacob Kinne, Nov. 23, 1753. The officers chosen were Benajah Bostwick, Clerk, and Samuel "Waller, Stephen Noble and Joseph Gary, Society's Committee. A vote was then passed to " meet at Jacob Kinne's house for 3 months for public AVorship in the winter season," provided they could obtain a minister. John Bostwick, Samuel Waller and Samuel Averill, were appointed a committee to hire a minister for three months. On the first Monday in December following, the society laid a tax of 12rf. on the pound, to hire a minister " for a season." They also voted to build by subscription, " two school-houses for the use of the society, one to be located between Nathaniel Bostwick's house and Steep Brook, in ye Highway, and the other near Joseph Gary's in the Highway." The following vote also passed :

    There have been several revivals, which added considerable numbers to the church : thirty in 1780 ; twenty-five in 1804 ; thirteen in 1812 ; eighty in 1816 ; forty-one in 1821; thirteen in 1826 ; thirty- eight in 1827 ; and thirteen in 1829.

    Washington, composed of the two societies of Judea and New Preston, was the first town incorporated in the state, after the declaration of independence. It was incorporated at a special session of the General Assembly, January 7,1779. The petitioners, who numbered forty-seven in Kent, one hundred and seventy-six in Woodbury, twenty in Litchfield, and twenty in New Milford, desired the Assembly to call their town by the name of Hampden, but their agents were persuaded to consent to have it called Washington, in honor of the commander-in-chief of the American armies. Its first meeting was held February 11, 1779, and William Cogswell was the first moderator.

    Its boundaries are as follows:

    " Beginning at the south-west corner of Judea parish; thence running a straight line easterly, to the south-west corner of Bethlehem, five miles and about one quarter of a mile; thence North by Bethlehem to Litchfield line, it being the north-west corner of Bethlehem ; thence continuing north in a straight line, to the north-east corner of the tract annexed from Litchfield; (the east line of Washington, so far as it is straight, is between five and six miles;) thence in a north-westerly direction, across the western part of Mount Tom, to Mount Tom bridge, crossing the western branch of Sheppauge river : thence in a line westerly, between Washington and Warren, to the West Pond; thence across said pond ninety rods to Fairweather's Grant. The diagonal line from the northeast corner of Washington to Mount Tom bridge, is about two miles and an half: the north line is about five miles in length. From the northwest corner of Washington the line runs about South, between Washington and

    Kent, one mile and a half to New Milford line; thence still South to the South line of New Milford, north purchase ; thence Southerly to the South-east bounds of the parish of New Preston, about one mile and an half; thence by New Milford, about three miles and an half to the first mentioned bounds."

    Washngton

    This is a good agricultural town, and has a considerable manufacturing interest. There are within its limits, six mercantile stores, employing a capital of from $12,000 to $15,000 ; one woolen manufactory, employing a capital of some $10,000, and making from 70,000 to 80,000 yards of cloth annually. There are two forges, not now in operation, and one cotton manufactory. There are two pocket furnaces with machine shops attached, employing from twelve to twenty men each, four wagon shops, one saddler's shop, one tannery, one chair and cabinet shop, one manufactory for making carpet yarn and seine twine, and fourteen saw-mills. From 600 to 1,000 casks of lime are annually burned, and from 25,000 to 30,000 feet of marble per annum, are quarried and sawed. There are three Congregational churches, and two Episcopal; a celebrated female seminary, under the care of Miss Brinsmade, and a select school for boys, under the care of Frederick W. Gunn, A. B. There is also a good circulating library. The population of the town, by the census of 1850, is 1,802.

    In 1708, an act of toleration passed, allowing all persons who should conform to it, the liberty of worshiping God in a way separate from that established by law, but it did not excuse them from paying taxes to the approved, settled ministers of the churches. In 1727, the members of the church of England made an application to the legislature to be exempted from paying taxes for the support 'of the ministry of any other denomination, and for liberty to tax themselves for the support of their own ministry. Accordingly an act was passed, directing that all persons within the limits of a parish, belonging to the church of England, and to the churches established by law, should be taxed by the same rule, and in the same proportion, for the support of the ministry in such parish, and where there was a society of the church of England, so near to any person who had declared himself to be of that church, that he could conveniently and did ordinarily attend public worship there, then the collector of the tax, on levying the same, should pay it to that minister of the church of England on which such person attended, who should have power to receive and recover the same ; and when the amount so obtained should be insufficient for the support of any such minister, the members of the society were vested with the power of taxing themselves, and they were also exempted from paying taxes for building or repairing the meeting-houses of the established churches. The same privileges were afterward granted to other dissenters from the established faith. In the revision of 1784, all dissenters were exempted from paying taxes to the established societies, where they had a society of their own and contributed to its support, on lodging a certificate from such church or society, properly authenticated, of the fact of such membership. Some disputes having arisen as to the validity of such certificates, and suspicions arising that an undue advantage was taken of the law, an act was passed, May, 1791, directing that certificates to be valid, must be approved by a justice of the peace. This law excited general disapprobation, and in October, the same year, an act was passed, authorizing dissenters to make certificates in their own names, and lodge them with the clerk of the society, in the limits of which they lived, which should exempt them from taxes as long as they ordinarily attended public worship in the society which they joined, and dissenting societies were authorized to tax themselves for all the purposes of other ecclesiastical societies. This was in effect placing all religious denominations on the same footing. Yet there was a nominal distinction, members of one society being obliged to lodge certificates with another. But now by the constitution, all distinction among societies is done away, and all denominations are placed on equal ground.

    History of ancient Woodbury, Connecticut

    By William Cothren

                          

    Elijah son of Samuel in records m. Lucina Easton born before 1767

    betsey b. 1801 d/o Elijah and Lucina Easton

    -----------------

     

    Eliza Atwood (prob b ~ 1796) m. Elijah , son of Job had Sarah m. Mr. Cossett. THIS IS A DIFFERENT ELIJAH

    Job 1775-1845 b.Brookfield m. Susan Cady s/o Isaac
    Job 1758-1833 b. Woodbridge m. Chloe Baldwin s/o Job

    ID: I471325

    • Name: Elijah Northrop 1
    • Father: Job Northrop is this the right one?
      Marriage 1 Eliza Atwood b~1796?? d/o Name: Daniel Atwood Birth: 8 JUL 1773 in Woodbury (Litchfield), Connecticut Death: 25 JUL 1839 in Watertown (Litchfield), Connecticut Burial: Old Cemetery, Watertown, Connecticut
      Children Sarah Northrop

    Eliza Atwood's brother Hermon Garry Atwood m. Betsey Northrop d. of widow phebe northrop

    perhaps phebe fairchild widow of Joshua NORTHROP??? Birth: 11 APR 1761 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut 1 Death: 12 DEC 1803 2

    Father: Joshua NORTHROP b: 1722 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    Mother: Mary BENNETT b: 6 JAN 1726/1727 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

    Marriage 1 Phebe FAIRCHILD b: ABT 1764 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut Married: 178 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

    Father: Jeremiah Northrup II (Jeremiah NORTHROP b: 19 JAN 1653/1654, Joseph NORTHROP b: 1623) b: ABT. 1689 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    Mother: Hannah Benedict b: ABT. 1697

    Marriage 1 Mary Bennett b: 1726 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut Married: 22 OCT 1747 2
    Children

    1. Has No Children Mary Northrup b: 19 OCT 1748 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    2. Has No Children Jane Northrup b: 13 JUN 1750 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    3. Has Children Mary Northrup b: 6 MAY 1754 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    4. Has No Children Hannah Northrup b: 30 NOV 1755 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    5. Has No Children Damaris Northrup b: 2 APR 1758 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    6. Has Children Joshua Northrop b: 11 APR 1760 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    7. Has Children Asa Northrop b: 1763 in Brookfield, Fairfield Co., Connecticut

    Lucy of Washington m. Benagah C. Dennie of Dover March 3, 1823

    ? perhaps Benjamin Dennie b: ABT 1804 s/oNicholas Dennie b: 1753 in Claverack, Columbia Co., New York and Anna M. Stoller b: 15 JUL 1765 in Montgomery Co., New York

    Jane married Hial Baldwin, Jr. May 2, 1802

    perhaps Jane NORTHROP b: 1779

    d/o Abel NORTHRUP b: Dec 1739 in Milford, CT and Susanna CAMP b: 1745 in Milford

    Lydia m. Elisha Barlow June 24, 1811 perhaps d/o Samuel 1757 his daughter Lydia Northrup b: ABT. 1795

    Not a remarriage for Elijah's mother, Lydia a different Lydia

    Elisha Barlow Sr is still married (Lydia, Mother of Elijah died Dec 24, 1814 age 91)

    First marriage for Elisha Barlow, Jr.b. 1787 S. Amenia, NY

    OR a son of John BARLOW b: 5 MAR 1748 in Kent, Litchfield, CT and Temperance BRANCH b: 3 MAY 1756 in Kent, Litchfield, CT

    Phebe of Washington m. John Stoddard of Woodbury Sept 11, 1786

    Father Unknown


    Phebe Northrop b: 19 Feb 1766 in Salisbury, , Litchfield, Connecticut OR Birth: ABT 1770 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

    s/o Father: Gideon Stoddard b: 24 Mar 1740 in Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut and Rebecca Hunt John dies Death: 15 Sep 1859 in Peru, , Clinton, New York

    Samuel Northrop Jr. m. June 3 1799 wid Sarah Dutton of Bethlehem

    THIS IS Has Children Samuel Northrup IV (Samuel b: ABT. 1757 in Milford Township, Connecticut samuel later moves to VT but prob some or all children b. CT

    who marries Sarah Frisbie b: ABT. 1755 who was formerly married to Asahel Dutton b: ABT. 1753 he died BEF. JUN 1779

    NOT -Samuel 1687 dies Death: 1748 in Amity (now Woodbridge, New Haven Co.)

    son Samuel appears to be still be married to Lydia Thomas

    MY AMOS could be son of Samuel 1757 but year is way off.

    census search no vt 1790

    census 1800 Samuel Northrop 01010/10110/00 Shoreham, Addison Cnty

    census 1800 Samuel Northrop 10110/11010/00 Middletown, Rutland Cnty

    Samuel in Middletown 1810 does not seem to include Amos

     

    Not Samuel Son of Samuel, but

     

    William Henry born -- son of Charles , laborer, and Harriet Dec 17, 1849

    ??

     

     

     

    Twenty-one persons have died in this society, either by violent or untimely deaths: of which number, six were drowned ; three were killed with fire-arms; tour were found abroad, dying or dead ; one was killed with a penknife; two children were burnt to death in a coal-pit; and five were murdered.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • ID: I529091528
    • Name: Abigail CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Abigail
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 10 Aug 1728 in New Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    • Death: 13 Jan 1805 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • Change Date: 16 Apr 2003 at 21:45

      Father: Samuel CANFIELD b: Abt 1697 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      Mother: Abigail PECK b: 25 Sep 1701 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut

      Marriage 1 David JUDSON b: 2 Mar 1723 in Woodbury, Litchfield, Connecticut
      • Married: 21 Nov 1753 in New Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      • Change Date: 15 Aug 2003
    • ID: I7987
    • Name: Abigail CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Abigail
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 21 MAR 1762 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 3 MAR 1844 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: Old Ground,Bridgewater 2 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 13:40:26

      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: 20 AUG 1737 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary EVERTON b: ABT 1735

      Marriage 1 Abijah TREAT b: 30 DEC 1761 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 6 MAR 1783 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has Children Joseph Canfield TREAT b: 11 AUG 1783 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has No Children Almon TREAT b: 1 OCT 1785 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Lorana TREAT b: 23 JAN 1789 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      4. Has Children Almon TREAT b: 25 JUL 1795 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Lorana TREAT b: 2 FEB 1798 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8045
    • Name: Alva Treat CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Alva Treat
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 14 JAN 1791 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 17 FEB 1821 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:41:56

      Father: John CANFIELD b: 18 FEB 1760 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Phebe TREAT b: 15 DEC 1763 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8041
    • Name: Amasa CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Amasa
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 16 JAN 1785 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 3 JAN 1861 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:41:23



      Father: John CANFIELD b: 18 FEB 1760 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Phebe TREAT b: 15 DEC 1763 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

      Marriage 1 Nancy RANDALL b: 3 JUL 1785 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 12 SEP 1804 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I7972
    • Name: Ann CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Ann
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1 SEP 1737 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 23 JAN 1770 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2 3
    • Change Date: 17 NOV 2007 at 00:47:24



      Father: Zeruabbabel CANFIELD c: 25 SEP 1709 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary BOSTWICK b: 8 FEB 1714/1715 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I03014
    • Name: Anna Jeanette Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 29 OCT 1807 in Bridgewater, Litchfield Co., CT
    • Death: 10 MAR 1844 in Bridgewater, Litchfield Co., CT



      Marriage 1 Henry Sanford b: 14 OCT 1806 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
      • Married: 4 DEC 1828 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
      Children
      1. Has No Children Canfield H. Sanford b: 28 JUL 1839 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
      2. Has Children Horace Nehemiah Sanford b: 4 JAN 1841 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
    • ID: I7999
    • Name: Anson CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Anson
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 14 NOV 1786 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 7 DEC 1860 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:54:58



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I1018
    • Name: Azariah CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Azariah
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1692 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Christening: 24 MAR 1694/1695 Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 1769 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Note: RESIDENCE: Settled in New Milford about 1728.

      MARRIAGE: WR Baldwin lists Mercy Bassett. Could be 2nd wife, or widow of
      either a Baldwin or a Bassett. Mercy often short for Mary. Mercy Bassett b.
      1694 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut

      MILITARY: 12 Jun 1779 with Continental Guards (?); Conn. State Library, War,
      7, 31 1 2 3
    • Change Date: 16 NOV 2007 at 23:17:37



      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 28 SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Alice HINE b: 16 DEC 1667 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 21 NOV 1669 in First Congregational,Milford

      Marriage 1 Mercy BASSETT b: 1694 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 24 OCT 1703 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 26 FEB 1719/1720 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has Children Azariah CANFIELD b: 25 NOV 1720 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut c: 22 JUN 1729 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has Children Freelove CANFIELD b: 29 DEC 1726 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has Children Oliver CANFIELD b: 25 DEC 1729 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      4. Has Children Israel CANFIELD b: 13 MAR 1733 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8061
    • Name: Burton CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Burton
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 28 FEB 1778 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 10 JAN 1848 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: South Britain Burying Ground,Southbury 2 3
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 14:08:11



      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743/1744 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 1746

      Marriage 1 Polly MITCHELL b: 1783 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 1 APR 1802 in Southbury,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has No Children Harriet CANFIELD b: 27 DEC 1802 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has No Children Mitchell Monroe CANFIELD b: 29 MAR 1809 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Lemuel Munson CANFIELD b: 19 APR 1820 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8062
    • Name: Charles Augustus CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Charles Augustus
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 24 SEP 1781 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 2 MAY 1782 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 14:12:35



      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743/1744 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 1746
    • ID: I7997
    • Name: Cyrus CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Cyrus
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1778 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 28 MAR 1829 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:54:35



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I81687
    • Name: Daniel CANFIELD
    • Sex: M 1
    • Birth: 29 OCT 1774 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
    • Death: 4 SEP 1853 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
    • _UID: 9654CB9BB1384E3E899EB7C109C0A6845710
    • Change Date: 24 MAR 2008

      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743 in New Milford, Litchfield, CT
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 17 JAN 1757 in Stratford, Fairfield, CT

      Marriage 1 Rebecca WARNER b: 10 DEC 1778 in Roxbury, Litchfield, CT
      • Married: 12 OCT 1803 in Roxbury, Litchfield, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Anna Jennette CANFIELD b: 29 OCT 1807 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
      2. Has Children Egbert Burton CANFIELD b: 22 AUG 1815 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
      3. Has No Children Anna Jeanette CANFIELD b: 1808
    • ID: I12022
    • Name: Elijah Herbert CANFIELD
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Given Name: Elijah Herbert
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1795 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Death: 30 Sep 1824 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Burial: 1824 South Cemetery, Bridgewater, CT
    • _UID: 569E130A3172B94CB30B1DD294B14164503C
    • Note: Listed in the 1790, 1800, 1810 and 1820 Censuses for new Milford, CT.
    • Change Date: 5 Apr 2008 at 01:00:00

      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD III b: 1774 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
      Mother: Polly BENNETT b: 1770 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT

      Marriage 1 Priscilla PECK b: 1791 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Elijah Starr CANFIELD b: 1817 in New Milford, Litchfield County, CT
    • ID: I7989
    • Name: Elizabeth CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Elizabeth
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Nickname: Betsey
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 10 MAR 1769 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 28 AUG 1841 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: New Ground,Bridgewater 2 2 3
    • Change Date: 4 JAN 2008 at 19:39:29

      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: 20 AUG 1737 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary EVERTON b: ABT 1735

      Marriage 1 Peter WOOSTER b: 1762 in Oxford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 16 JAN 1787 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has Children John WOOSTER b: 1790 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has Children Susanna WOOSTER b: ABT 1800

      Marriage 2 John OVIATT b: 7 FEB 1767 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: ABT 1799
    • ID: I7974
    • Name: Enos CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Enos
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 8 FEB 1741/1742 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 10 DEC 1761 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2 3
    • Change Date: 17 NOV 2007 at 00:49:13

      Father: Zeruabbabel CANFIELD c: 25 SEP 1709 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary BOSTWICK b: 8 FEB 1714/1715 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I16084
    • Name: Ira CANFIELD
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1754 in New Milford, Litchfield, CT
    • Death: 9 JUN 1824 in New Milford, Litchfield, CT
    • Burial: Long Mtn., New Milford, Litchfield, CT
    • Note: From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.
    • Change Date: 9 JUL 2001

      Father: David CANFIELD b: 7 Mar 1725/1726 in Milford, Litchfield, CT
      Mother: Mary NORTHRUP b: 24 MAY 1726 in Milford, New Haven, CT

      Marriage 1 Rhoda EDWARDS b: ABT 1767
    • ID: I13270
    • Name: Jeremiah CANFIELD III
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Given Name: Jeremiah
    • Suffix: III
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1774 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Death: 19 Apr 1828 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Burial: 1828 South Cemetery, Bridgewater, CT
    • _UID: 0AE859E593FC824D85F91D7F3802515A8D3A
    • Note: From an old family of Bridgewater.
      A prominent inhabitant of Bridgewater, CT.
      Member of the Ecclesiastical Society of the local church in 1809.
      Had at least four children. Only Elijah is listed here.
    • Change Date: 5 Apr 2008 at 01:00:00



      Marriage 1 Polly BENNETT b: 1770 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Elijah Herbert CANFIELD b: 1795 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • ID: I203485
    • Name: Jeremiah Canfield Jr
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Given Name: Jeremiah
    • Suffix: Jr
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: Jun 1688 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • Death: Sep 1756 in Fort Edward (Litchfield,Ct)
    • _UID: 079D8F0BE9FDD243A4599BA653CD865572E1
    • Change Date: 27 Oct 2004 at 01:00:00



      Father: Jeremiah Canfield Sr<<$>> b: 26 Sep 1662 in Milford,New Haven,Ct c: 28 Sep 1662 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Mother: Alice Hine --<<< b: 16 Dec 1667 in Milford,New Haven,Ct c: 21 Nov 1669 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct

      Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
      • Married: 24 Jul 1711 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • D: I7574
    • Name: John CANFIELD
    • Given Name: John
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1766 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2
    • Change Date: 22 MAR 2009 at 14:51:58



      Father: David CANFIELD b: 7 MAR 1725/1726 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary NORTHROP b: 24 MAY 1726 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I4826
    • Name: John CANFIELD
    • Given Name: John
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: Abt 1740 in Kent, Litchfield County, Connecticut
    • Death: 26 Oct 1786
    • Burial: Kent, Litchfield County, Connecticut
    • _UID: F2D9A98A06F74DBFB5BD863A464B3F939CD8
    • Change Date: 11 Oct 2005 at 23:49



      Father: Samuel CANFIELD b: 4 Jun 1710
      Mother: Mary BARNUM
    • ID: I1025
    • Name: Joseph CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Joseph
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Prefix: Captain
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1711 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Christening: 1711/1712 Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 25 SEP 1776 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Burial: Center Cemetery,New Milford 2 3
    • Note: MILITARY: Served in French and Indian War 1755, 1758. 2 4
    • Change Date: 16 NOV 2007 at 23:23:24



      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 28 SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Alice HINE b: 16 DEC 1667 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 21 NOV 1669 in First Congregational,Milford

      Marriage 1 Jerusha BOSTWICK b: 15 JUL 1717 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 15 JAN 1736/1737 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
      Children
      1. Has Children Joseph CANFIELD b: 27 JAN 1737/1738 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has Children Isaac CANFIELD b: 1 NOV 1740 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Eunice CANFIELD b: 18 JUN 1745 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      4. Has Children Rhoda CANFIELD b: 17 MAR 1747/1748 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8047
    • Name: Laura CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Laura
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 19 JAN 1796 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 29 DEC 1872 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: New Ground,Bridgewater 1 1
    • Change Date: 14 SEP 2007 at 13:03:48



      Father: John CANFIELD b: 18 FEB 1760 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Phebe TREAT b: 15 DEC 1763 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

      Marriage 1 Roswell MORRIS b: 1795 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 26 NOV 1818 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8063
    • Name: Lemuel CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Lemuel
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Suffix: Jr.
    • Title: Jr.
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 26 MAR 1787 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 15 MAR 1817 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: South Britain Burying Ground,Southbury 2 3
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:52:26



      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743/1744 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 1746

      Marriage 1 Elizabeth MITCHELL b: ABT 1790 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 30 AUG 1807
      Children
      1. Has No Children Jerome Mitchell CANFIELD b: 26 MAR 1808 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

      Marriage 2 Elizabeth S. HINMAN b: 1792
      • Married: 1814
    • ID: I7992
    • Name: Lucinda CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Lucinda
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 7 AUG 1768 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 8 JUN 1813 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:56:49



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I25484
    • Name: Mary CANFIELD 1
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1746 1
    • Death: 23 JAN 1751 in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 27 AUG 2002



      Father: David CANFIELD b: 7 MAR 1725 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      Mother: Mary NORTHRUP b: 24 JAN 1725 in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • ID: I8000
    • Name: Orlando CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Orlando
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1788 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 15 NOV 1813 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:55:13



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I68971
    • Name: Polly CANFIELD
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: ABT 1776 1
    • Death: 12 DEC 1797 in Woodbury, Litchfield County, CT 1
    • _UID: 57227863A5AAB34F9D84F8421FD86193EBCB
    • Note: Died 12 December 1797, aged 21.
    • Change Date: 21 JUL 2005 at 21:00:00



      Father: Thomas CANFIELD

      Marriage 1 Ira SANFORD b: 10 OCT 1774 in Plymouth, New Haven County, CT
      • Married: 25 JUL 1797 1 1
    • D: I8001
    • Name: Samuel CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Samuel
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 2 JAN 1792 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 28 SEP 1840 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:55:25



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

     

    • ID: I11136
    • Name: Sarah CANFIELD 1
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 13 MAY 1794
    • Death: 11 MAY 1865 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut



      Father: Nathaniel CANFIELD
      Mother: Mary FERRY

      Marriage 1 Samuel NETTLETON b: 13 DEC 1791 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut
      • Married: 31 DEC 1816 in Roxbury, Litchfield, Connecticut

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    18th Century History - Cheshire Academy is Founded
    From 1770 – 1780, the Episcopal religion was floundering in the colonies. Believing that the religion would be better received if there were an American bishop, a delegation sent Samuel Seabury to England. When he returned as the first Episcopal Bishop of America, one of his first duties was to start a school to educate future clergy. Cheshire was chosen as the site and in 1794 the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut opened its doors.
    The first headmaster, Rev. John Bowden, taught classes in a small building in town until the completion of a new school building. Bowden Hall was erected in 1796 as an “all Cheshire project,” since only one third of the donors belonged to the church. The original charter was quite liberal, providing for the education of both genders and the freedom for students to practice the religion of their family’s choice. In 1836, a new constitution designated the school as exclusively for boys, a system that didn’t change until 1969.
    19th Century History - Cheshire Academy Evolves
    The school taught classical studies and entered a period of stability. An interesting fact is that even though the school was officially The Episcopal Academy, by the early 1800s, parents and boys addressed letters to The Cheshire Academy. This was seen in letters of graduate Samuel Welles to his son Gideon Welles (letter 1, letter 2), who would later become Secretary of the Navy under Lincoln.

     

     

     

    • ID: I406059
    • Name: MARY KEELER NORTHROP
    • Surname: NORTHROP
    • Given Name: MARY KEELER
    • Sex: F
    • _UID: 427C61302D5A6E4A9035B70C51BB1EFD3D29
    • Change Date: 20 May 2005 at 06:27:27



      Marriage 1 SAMUEL CAMP b: 7 Dec 1744 in EAST HAVEN, NEW HAVEN, CT
      • Married: 17 Oct 1782 in RIDGEFIELD, FAIRFIELD, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children MARY CAMP b: 10 Jun 1773 in SALISBURY, LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT

    no listing for parents

     

    died in Kent, CT

    • D: I62163
    • Name: Anne NORTHRUP
    • Sex: F
    • Change Date: 9 AUG 2007
    • Birth: Abt 1735 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut 1
    • Death: 23 APR 1803 1
    • Baptism: 05 OCT 1735 First Congregational Church, Milford, New Haven, Connecticut 1

      Father: Josiah NORTHRUP b: Abt 1699
      Mother: Mary SANFORD b: 05 JUL 1702

      Marriage 1 Jonah CAMP b: Abt 1727 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      • Married: 2
      Children
      1. Has Children John CAMP b: 23 DEC 1761 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      2. Has Children Chauncey CAMP b: 12 APR 1762 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Gould CAMP b: 04 JUL 1765 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      4. Has No Children Jonah CAMP b: 16 AUG 1765 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Abiel CAMP b: 10 JUL 1771 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      6. Has No Children Sarah Ann CAMP b: 13 JUL 1776 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • ID: I63779
    • Name: Josiah NORTHRUP
    • Sex: M
    • Change Date: 9 AUG 2007
    • Birth: Abt 1699 1

      Marriage 1 Mary SANFORD b: 05 JUL 1702
      • Married: 1
      Children
      1. Has Children Anne NORTHRUP b: Abt 1735 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut

      Sources:
      1. Author: David Payne-Joyce
        Title: Payne-Joyce Genealogy
        Abbrev: Payne-Joyce Genealogy
        Publication: http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/

     

    Died Washington, CT

    • ID: I145046
    • Name: Elizabeth NORTHRUP
    • Given Name: Elizabeth
    • Surname: Northrup
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 17 JAN 1733 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • Death: 8 JUN 1809 in Washington,Litchfield,Ct
    • Change Date: 8 APR 2005 at 01:00:00

      Father: Phineas NORTHRUP c: 16 JAN 1694/1695 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Mother: Elizabeth BRINSMADE

      Marriage 1 Enos BALDWIN b: 1730 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Children
      1. Has Children Samuel BALDWIN b: 3 MAR 1769 in Washington,Litchfield,Ct

    SISTER

    • ID: I149101
    • Name: Ann NORTHRUP
    • Given Name: Ann
    • Surname: Northrup
    • Sex: F
    • Christening: 27 MAR 1737 Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • Death: 18 JAN 1777
    • Change Date: 28 JUN 2003 at 01:00:00

      Father: Phineas NORTHRUP c: 16 JAN 1694/1695 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Mother: Elizabeth BRINSMADE

      Marriage 1 Benjamin BEERS b: 23 APR 1736 in Milford Twp,Litchfield,Ct
      Children
      1. Has Children Phebe BEERS
      2. Has Children John BEERS b: 1766 in Milford,New Haven,Ct

    ANOTHER SISTER

    • ID: I81764
    • Name: Phebe NORTHRUP
    • Sex: F 1
    • Birth: 6 APR 1735
    • Death: 4 SEP 1822 in Washington, Litchfield, CT
    • _UID: F1098F9B3E3F4AE78FF1B4F0017BA7D3EC75
    • Change Date: 11 MAR 2008

      Father: Phineas NORTHRUP b: 1707
      Mother: Elizabeth BRINSMADE b: MAR 1709

      Marriage 1 Samuel GUNN b: 1740 in Milford, New Haven, CT
      • Married:
      Children
      1. Has No Children John Northrup GUNN b: 18 JUN 1772 in Milford, New Haven, CT

    -----

    • ID: I645
    • Name: Samuel Northrup 1 2 3 4 5 6
    • Sex: M 7
    • Birth: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT 8 9 10 3 11 5 6
    • Death: BEF 1787 in Washington, CT 12
    • Note: 12 He lived in Washington, CT and his estate was settled in 1787.
    • Change Date: 16 JUN 2005

      Father: Samuel Northrup b: 5 JUN 1687 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      Mother: Sarah Andrews b: 30 SEP 1688 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., CT

      Marriage 1 Lydia Thomas b: ABT 1722 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      • Married: 10 JUN 1746 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT 13 14 15 16 17
      Children
      1. Has No Children Lydia Northrup b: 22 OCT 1747 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      2. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 1 APR 1749 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      3. Has Children Samuel Northrup b: 18 OCT 1755 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      4. Has No Children Enoch Northrup b: ABT 1757 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      5. Has No Children Elijah Northrup b: ABT 1759 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      6. Has No Children Phoebe Northrup b: ABT 1761 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT

    ------

    • ID: I8602
    • Name: Harriet NORTHROP
    • Given Name: Harriet
    • Surname: Northrop
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1809 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 22 MAR 1861 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: Northville Cem,New Milford

      Marriage 1 Seymour MOREHOUSE b: 24 JAN 1798 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 7 SEP 1828
      Children
      1. Has No Children Artemitia MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1829
      2. Has No Children Noble MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1831
      3. Has No Children Harriet MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1833
      4. Has No Children Polly MOREHOUSE b: 1834 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Henry S. MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1835
      6. Has No Children Eliza MOREHOUSE b: 1838 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I5667
    • Name: Hattie Chloe Northrop 1 2
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 5 JUN 1858 in OH 3 2
    • Census: 1870 Medina, Medina Co., OH 4
    • Death: 4 MAY 1901 in Washington, Litchfield Co., CT 2
    • Cause: heart attack 2
    • Note: 2 Hattie was grand-daughter of Nira Northrup. Hattie died on the Washington Green on 5-4-1901 of a heart attack in her horse carriage. She went to the drug store on Washington green to get medicine. She got into the buggy and suffered a heart attack. The horse continued on the the Depot and that is where they found her dead. She was 43. Hattie & John Burr met on campus in Storrs CT. They moved to Ohio, had their sons there and then migrated back to CT before 1886.
    • Change Date: 9 AUG 2004

      Father: Dwight Benjamin Northrop b: ABT 1825 in Medina Co., OH
      Mother: Delia Briggs b: ABT 1825 in OH

      Marriage 1 John Burr Hollister b: 28 JAN 1856 in Torrington, CT
      • Married: 22 SEP 1878 in Medina, Medina Co., OH 2
      Children
      1. Has Children Pearl Delia Hollister b: 3 SEP 1879 in Medina, Medina Co., OH
      2. Has Children George Hubert Hollister b: 14 APR 1882 in Medina, Medina Co., OH
      3. Has Children Sherman Preston Hollister b: 11 FEB 1884 in Medina, Medina Co., OH
      4. Has Children Wesley Oviatt Hollister b: 24 APR 1886 in Washington, Litchfield Co., CT

    CHECK FURTHER

    -----------

    • ID: I35492
    • Name: Jane NORTHROP
    • Surname: Northrop
    • Given Name: Jane
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 4 Jul 1779 in Milford,New Haven,Connecticut,USA
    • Death: BEF 1804 in Washington,Litchfield,Connecticut,USA
    • LDS Baptism: status: DONE
    • Endowment: status: DONE
    • _UID: CED5E2E06BE6CE47B6F5DC1F9CB77B9FDED8
    • Sealing Child: status: DONE
    • Change Date: 11 Aug 2003 at 06:04:45

      Marriage 1 Jehiel BALDWIN b: 9 May 1780 in Milford,New Haven,Connecticut,USA
      • Married: 2 May 1802 in Milford,New Haven,Connecticut,USA
      • Sealing Spouse: 26 Aug 2000 in JRIVE
      Children
      1. Has No Children Jane BALDWIN b: 15 Sep 1802 in Washington,Litchfield,Connecticut,USA

    ---------

    • ID: I212
    • _UPD: 19 MAR 2009 22:37:55 GMT-6
    • Name: Gershom Fenn
    • Given Name: Gershom
    • Surname: Fenn
    • Sex: M
    • Birth:
    • _UID: 8228F253-82D3-4A1E-A7E0-C71D82839DF4
    • RIN: MH:IF3898 12 JAN 1771
    • Death:
    • _UID: A2BF1076-A440-4002-BFCD-CFB0E52F75FC
    • RIN: MH:IF3899 14 JUN 1852 in Washington, Litchfield County, Connecticut USA
    • RIN: MH:I252
    • _UID: ADAE80B5-6983-466A-8EA5-BD16726A5B53
    • Event: Smart Matching
    • ROLE: 1000621 1

      Father: Joseph Fenn b: 14 SEP 1745
      Mother: Esther Brown b: 17 AUG 1751 in New Hampshire, USA

      Sources:
      1. Author: laura sales
        Title: schenkel Web Site
        Text: MyHeritage.com family tree
        Family site: schenkel Web Site
        Family tree: schenkel Family Tree
        Page: Gershom Fenn
        Date: 19 MAR 2009
        Text: Added by confirming a Smart Match
        Quality: 3

     

    Died Litchfield

    • ID: I30847
    • Name: Aaron Fenn
    • Surname: Fenn
    • Given Name: Aaron
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 20 Nov 1746 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    • Death: 30 Jun 1821 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • _UID: B35C63A39AEDD6119804AF31BE9FBE4B6528
    • Change Date: 7 May 2002 at 06:12:49

      Father: James Fenn
      Mother: Sarah Buckingham

      Marriage 1 Mary Bradley b: 5 Aug 1750 in of New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
      • Married: 15 Mar 1770 in Woodbridge, New Haven, Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has No Children Sally Fenn b: 9 Dec 1771 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      2. Has Children Aaron Fenn b: 20 Dec 1772 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      3. Has Children Mary Fenn b: 5 Oct 1779 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      4. Has No Children Erastus Fenn b: 29 Dec 1781 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Polly Fenn b: 13 Aug 1785 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      6. Has No Children David Fenn b: 12 Nov 1787 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      7. Has No Children Jeremiah Fenn b: ABT 1789 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut

    ----

    • ID: I125884
    • Name: Hannah ?KEELER
    • Given Name: Hannah
    • Surname: ?Keeler
    • Sex: F
    • _UID: 3E0537E718666A498E1EC8C345FE126F8D81
    • Change Date: 22 Apr 2006
    • Note: Hannah ?Keeler may have been married to Elijah Hickox prior to marrying Samuel Fenn.
    • Birth: 23 DEC 1757 1
    • Death: Y

    Marriage 1 Samuel FENN b: 27 SEP 1746

    • Married: 13 NOV 1803 1

     

    • ID: P3302520508
    • Name: Samuel Fenn
    • Birth: 27 Sep 1746 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
    • Death: Feb 1827 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
    • Sex: M 1

      Father: Benjamin Fenn V b: 17 Apr 1720 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      Mother: Mary Peck b: 30 Jul 1718 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

      Marriage 1 Hannah Hickox b: 23 Dec 1857 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      • Married: 13 Nov 1803 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      Children
      1. Has No Children Mary Fenn b: 1770 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      2. Has No Children Elizabeth Ann Fenn b: 14 Sep 1773 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      3. Has No Children Samuel Fenn b: 1774 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      4. Has No Children Polly Fenn b: 1776 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      5. Has No Children Benjamin Fenn b: 18 Mar 1778 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      6. Has No Children Lucinda Fenn b: 4 Aug 1780 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      7. Has No Children Sally Fenn b: 23 Aug 1784 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      8. Has No Children Cornelia Fenn b: 22 Jul 1787 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

      Marriage 2 Elizabeth Baldwin b: 2 Jul 1750 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      • Married: 1765 in , , Connecticut, USA
      Children
      1. Has No Children Mary Fenn b: 1770 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      2. Has No Children Elizabeth Ann Fenn b: 14 Sep 1773 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      3. Has No Children Samuel Fenn b: 1774 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      4. Has No Children Polly Fenn b: 1776 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      5. Has No Children Benjamin Fenn b: 18 Mar 1778 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      6. Has No Children Lucinda Fenn b: 4 Aug 1780 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      7. Has No Children Sally Fenn b: 23 Aug 1784 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      8. Has No Children Cornelia Fenn b: 22 Jul 1787 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

     

     

     

     

     

    http://www.ci.bethlehem.ct.us/OBHSI/oldcemetery.htm

    Places checked

    nEWTOWN POOTATUCK
    LITCHFIELD BANTAM, Bantam Falls, Bradleyville
    KENT SCATACOOK
    BETHEL FM DANBURY  
    WOODBURY POMPERAUG
    STRATFORD CUPHEAG
    MILFORD WEPAWAUG
    TRUMBULL, NORTH STRATFORD  
    WESTON NORTHFIELD
    Morris checked South Farms?
    Brookfield/
    Newbury checked

     

    Bridgewater checked  
    Bethlehem
    checked FROM WOODBURY
     
    Brookfield Newbury

    Seymour
    checked

    Humphreysville
    checked

    petition requested that the town be named "Richmond.

    Chuse-town.

    The name given to Seymour when it was the camping-ground of Joe Chuse
    (Joseph Mainveelm) and his band, and by which the place was known until it became Humphreysville.

    Derby checked (Seymour - Humphreysville was earlier part of Derby)

    Birmingham, CT checked part of Derby name used through at least 1880

     


     


    Derby was to become the first inland settlement on the Naugatuck River.

    Dr. Daniel W. Northrup was the fourth homœopath in the state, having begun practice at Sherman, Fairfield county, in 1843. Dr. Daniel Holt, another pioneer in New Haven, was born at Hampton, July 2, 1810. He was educated at Ashford and Amherst academies and in 1831 entered the scientific department of Yale.

    Ripton northern portion of Stratford -- now Huntington Shelton, Monroe
    Bromica, Bull's Bridge, Ore Hill, Schaghticoke, Flanders, Flat Rocks, Geer Mountain, Good Hill, Treasure Hill, kent

    Washington JUDEDA & NEW PRESTON

    checked

    Marbledale checked

    Nettleton hollow

    New Preston Hills

    New Preston/Marbledale-washington depot
    Blackville-washington
    Calhoun Street - washington
    Church Hill - washington
    Romford-washington
    Washington Green

    Marbledale Checked,
    New Preston, checked
    Woodville, checked Washington Depot Parish of New Preston belonged to New Milford became Washington 1779

    prob part of New Milford North Purchase
    In 1746, William Cogswell's father, Edward, secured the right to mine iron ore in the New Milford North Purchase.

    The Iron Works was established along the Aspetuck River, near the foot of the road leading to New Preston hill. The Iron Works was the first industry in the North Purchase.

    During the first half of the 19th century, a variety of new industries began to spring up and flourish in the town of Washington. A coopers' shop prospered in Marbledale, while grist, cider, flax and saw mills churned.

    Factories producing everything from twine, hats and cheese boxes to ax handles, shoes and harnesses were able to thrive in the growing community.

    Turnpikes were built to connect Washington to neighboring communities, and by 1872 the area's first railroad -- The Shepaug Railroad -- was expanding the small town's reach. (The Shepaug Railroad ran a freight line until 1948.)

    Washington Green. This section of town encompasses "Judea," Joseph Hurlbut's original parish on the land that would later become the town of Washington.

     

    Watertown checked PLYMOUTH FROM WATERTOWN WESTBURY
    CHESHIRE WEST FARMS ON MILL RIVER
    DERBY PAUGUSSET
    greenfield checked  
    woodbury checked POMPERAUG
    southbury SOUTH PART OF WOODBURY

    The town of Southbury was one of several towns formed out of a parcel of land purchased from the Paugussett Indians in 1659. It was originally part of Woodbury, which was settled in 1673. A new meetinghouse for the Southbury Ecclesiastical Society was built in 1733, and in 1787 the town of Southbury was incorporated.[1] Although incorporated as part of Litchfield County, Southbury has been in New Haven county for most of its existence.[2]

    In the 1800s, water power became essential to the growth of Southbury's industries, which included mills, tanneries, and distilleries.[3] The water power came primarily from the Pomperaug[4] and Housatonic rivers. As the industrial revolution progressed, many of these businesses left for Waterbury.

    south britain  
    northville parts of kent warren washington much of it formerly the "North End of New Milford" including marbledale, new preston
    Kent Hollow  
    North Society New Fairfield

    No proof, but I'm sure this is a connection to Amos -- can't be sister

    2336. Elihu Ives (Lydia Augur , Abraham Augur , Elizabeth Bradley , Isaac Bradley , William , Danyell ) was born on 8 Oct 1777 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died on 2 Oct 1849 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    Elihu married (1) Mary Northrop on 16 Mar 1802 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Mary was born about 1780. She died before 1804 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    Elihu married (2) Lucy Whittimore on 29 Jul 1804 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Lucy was born on 6 Mar 1781 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 3 Feb 1848 in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. She was buried in Grove Street Cem., New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    They had the following children:

      4012 F i Mary Whittimore Ives was born on 2 Jul 1805 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 17 Sep 1806 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
      4013 F ii Mary Northrop Ives was born on 4 Sep 1806 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 4 Jan 1881 in Montgomery, alabama, USA.
      4014 M iii William Augustus Ives was born on 26 Dec 1809 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died on 16 Jul 1885 in Rubicon, Wisconsin, USA.
            William married Elizabeth M. Pardee daughter of Isaac Holt Pardee and Sarah Hotchkiss on 22 Mar 1842 in East Haven, Connecticut, USA. Elizabeth was born on 24 Feb 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 19 Oct 1907.
      4015 F iv Jane Catherine Ives was born on 21 Oct 1812 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died after 1850 in (prob.) Columbus, Georgia, USA.
            Jane married Henry Hall. Henry was born about 1808 in Columbus, Georgia, USA.
      4016 F v Sophia Ives was born on 2 Sep 1814 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died after 1850 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA.
      4017 F vi Anne Vose Ives was born on 1 Dec 1816 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 14 Sep 1838.
      4018 M vii Elihu Lafayette Ives was born on 7 Oct 1818 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died on 27 Nov 1872.
            Elihu married (1) Grace Ann Lego on 1 Jun 1843 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Grace was born on 25 May 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 8 Apr 1844 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
            Elihu married (2) Sarah R. Bray on 19 May 1847 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Sarah was born on 16 Mar 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 8 Jan 1870 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
      4019 F viii Lucy Whittimore Ives was born on 13 May 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
      4020 M ix George Washinton Ives was born on 11 May 1822 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died after 1850 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA.
      4021 F x Lydia Augur Ives was born on 12 Apr 1824 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
            Lydia married Abraham C. Thompson on 5 Sep 1844 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Abraham was born about 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

     

    SAMUEL Northrop in Washington CT 1799

    • ID: I1122
    • Name: Sarah FRISBIE 1 2 3
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1756
    • Christening: 1756 Branford, CT
    • Death: 24 FEB 1840 in Cass co., MI
    • Note: In 1827 she signed a document transferring all of her assets to her son, Amos Frisbie Northrop, in exchange for him agreeing to support her the rest of her life. In 1838 she moved with him from Middleton, VT to Cass county, MI.
    • Change Date: 19 JUL 1999

    Father: Amos FRISBIE b: 17 FEB 1729 in Branford, CT
    Mother: Mary LUDDINGTON

    Marriage 1 Asahel DUTTON b: 2 FEB 1753 in Wallingford, New Haven, Cn c: 4 FEB 1756

    • Married: 3 NOV 1772 in Woodbury, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Asahel E. DUTTON b: ABT 1774 in CT
      2. Has No Children Elias DUTTON b: ABT 1775

      Marriage 2 Samuel NORTHROP b: 18 OCT 1755 in Milford, CT
      • Married: 3 JUN 1779 in Washington, CT of Washington when he was married
      Children
      1. Has No Children Amos Frisbie NORTHROP b: 4 JAN 1799 in Middleton, Rutland, VT

      Sources:
      1. Text: The evidence that Asahel Dutton and Sarah Frisbie were the parents of Asahel E. Dutton is circumstantial, but highly pursuasive:
        1.Asahel and Sarah's birth dates and marriage date are appropriate for them being the parents of the younger Asahel.
        2. The fact that both men had the same name is an obvious clue.
        3. The younger Asahel named one of his sons James Frisbie Dutton. James Frisbie was the name of one of Sarah's brothers.
        4. James Frisbie shared a claim to land in Bradford county, Pennsylvania with Solomon Moss, who was the father-in-law of the younger Asahel Dutton.
        5. The families of both the suspected parents and Asahel E. Dutton all moved to Poultney, VT. Sarah Frisbie and 4 of her brothers moved to the Poultney area when the younger Asahel was a young child. Further, the sister of the elder Asahel, Lois Dutton, moved to Poultney. The first docuement event involving the younger Asahel was his moving from Poultney in 1800.
      2. Text: Edward Frisbie of Branford and His Descendants, by Nora G. Frisbie. Published 1984 by Gateway Press, Inc.
      3. Text: Families of Ancient New Haven, compiled by Donald Lines Jacobus, published by Clarence D. Smith, Rome, NY, 1923

    ---------------------------------IS THIS AMOS' FATHER OR UNCLE??
    Father:
    Samuel Northrup III b: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut Mother: Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    This Samuel is Gideon's brother Mother was ~37 when Gideon born

    Is this his only marriage? waited til age 27?
    ID: I03791 Name: Samuel Northrup III 1 2 3 4 5 Sex: M ALIA: Samuel * /Northrop/ Birth: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut 2 Death: BEF. 1787 Will: 1787 Samuel's estate settled. He spelled his name "Samuel Northrop" in his will. 2 ADDR: Washington Connecticut U. S. A.

    Father: Samuel Northrup , Jr. b: ABT. JUN 1687 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    Mother: Sarah Andrews b: ABT. SEP 1688
    Marriage 1 Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut Married: 10 JUN 1746 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., Connecticut 2Children

    1. Has No Children Lydia Northrup b: 22 OCT 1747 in Washington Co., Connecticut Will: Probably died young as she was not mentioned in her father, Samuel's, will.
    2. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 1 APR 1749 Death: 25 APR 1749 in Died in infancy 2
    3. Has No Children Phoebe Northrup b: ABT. 1751 in Washington Co., Connecticut Marriage 1 John Stoddard b: ABT. 1749
    4. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: ABT. 1753 Death: UNKNOWN in Died young _NAMS: Named for a sibling that died earlier
    5. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 18 OCT 1755 in Washington Co., Connecticut Death: UNKNOWN _NAMS: Named for sibling who died earlier
    6. Has Children Samuel Northrup IV b: ABT. 1757 in Milford Township, Connecticut Marriage 1 Sarah Frisbie b: ABT. 1755 Married: 3 JUN 1779
    7. Has Children Enoch Northrup b: ABT. 1759 in Washington Co., Connecticut Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
    8. Has Children Elijah Northrup b: ABT. 1761 in Washington Co., Connecticut ID: I08200 Name: Elijah Northrup 1 2 3 Sex: M Birth: ABT. 1761 in Washington Co., Connecticut 2 Death: 1829 in Humphreysville, Connecticut Military Service: Served (American Revolutionary War) Event: Pension Awarded a pension (#s36199)Marriage 1 Lucina Easton b: ABT. 1764 Married: 1785

      Children

      1. Has Children Ebenezer Northrup , Sr. b: 1786 (maybe Washington) Death: 11 JAN 1835 2 Residence: Seymour, New Haven Co., Connecticut Marriage 1 Mercy Northrup b: 25 APR 1791 in Milford, New Haven Co.,(d/o Heth Mercy's siblings Has Children Newton Northrup b: 26 MAY 1781 in Milford, Elizabeth Ann Northrup b: 7 MAY 1783 in Milford, Has Children Ephraim Northrup b: 15 NOV 1786 in Milford, Has Children Abner Northrup b: 28 JUL 1788 in New Haven, Has Children Mercy Northrup b: 25 APR 1791 in Milford,Has No Children Wheeler Northrup b: 7 OCT 1793 in Milford, Has Children Luther Northrup b: 17 AUG 1796 in Milford,Has Children Andrew Northrup b: 12 JAN 1800 in Milford, )
      2. Connecticut Married: ABT. 1812 2
        Children
      1. Has No Children John Northrup b: ABT. 1814
      2. Has No Children Elizabeth Ann Northrup b: ABT. 1816
      3. Has No Children Daniel Northrup b: ABT. 1818
      4. Has No Children Ebenezer Northrup , Jr. b: ABT. 1820
      5. Has No Children Betsey Emeline Northrup b: ABT. 1822

      Althea Northrup b: 1789ID: I45913 Name: Althea Northrup 1 Sex: F Birth: 1789 Death: UNKNOWN

      Harvey Northrup b: 1796 ID: I42966 Name: Harvey Northrup 1 Sex: M Birth: 1796 Death: UNKNOWN
      Lucinda Northrup b: 1799 ID: I44836 Name: Lucinda Northrup 1 Sex: F Birth: 1799 Death: UNKNOWN
      Betsey Northrup b: 1801 ID: I44833 Name: Betsey Northrup 1 Sex: F Birth: 1801 Death: UNKNOWN Marriage 1 William Steele b: ABT. 1799

    both from Connecticut historical collections By John Warner Barber

     
    Perhaps something more than Ethan Allen’s personal charism made the Brownsons especially responsive to his influence. Allen had joined the Brownson family back in Connecticut; he had married Mary, the daughter of Cornelius Brownson, on June 23, 1762, in Judea parish, Woodbury. The wedding ceremony cost him four shillings. (9)

    Between the years 1806 and 18 16 several boys had drifted away from the Sandwich Islands as seamen and became tempo- rarily residents of New England ; some of them had begun to ac- quire an education by private assistance and a few, in 18 16, were gathered into a flourishing school at Morris, Conn. Henry Obookiah, one of the most influential, had joined the church in Torringford the previous 3'ear, and was preparing to be a mission ary to his native land under the direction of the Litchfield North
    Consociation.

    hist records of the town of cornwall

    Life and letters of Horace Bushnell"

    Tracing the family lineage of the Bushnells, we find them among the first settlers of Guilford and later of Saybrook,. Conn. We learn of no titled or distinguished persons among them. Whether Francis Bushnell, " ye elder," signer of the covenant for the settlement of Guilford, made on ship-board
    by the colonists in June, 1639, was or was not the father of the three original Saybrook Bushnells remains a moot point among genealogists, but there was undoubtedly a relationship between them. Deacon Francis Bushnell, Lieutenant Will iam Bushnell and Kichard Bushnell, all of Saybrook, were brothers, and from them the Connecticut Bushnells are de scended. Fifth in the line of descent from Lieutenant Will iam was Abraham Bushnell, \vho married Molly Ensign of West Hartford and Salisbury, lived many years at Canaan Falls, Conn., and finally removed to Starksboro, Vermont. They had thirteen children, the second of whom was Ensign, the father of Horace Bushnell.^

    * For genealogy see note p. 569 et seq.

     

    EARLY LIFE AT HOME.

    In 1805, Eiisign Buslmell removed his family to New Preston, a village about fifteen miles distant from Litchfield, and in the most picturesque part of the same county. There is reason to think that the inducement to this removal lay in the superior water-power of New Preston, and that an interest in carding wool and dressing cloth by machinery had come to Ensign Bushnell from his father at Canaan Falls, where was erected in 1802 the first carding machine ever built in the State. At all events this, in addition to farming, soon became his business.

    The scenery of New Preston abounds in lovely pictures of which Lake Wararnaug is the centre. Its outline is irregular, the shores hilly and on the east even mountainous and densely wooded. From the base of a mountain on the eastern side, known as the Pinnacle, the lake turns westward with a wider sweep, its banks indented with little coves and crowned with
    green farms, which are freshened here and there by sparkling brooks. Boiling hills fill the western distance. The scene is one of purely New England character, full of fresh suggestion and rural charm untamed by culture. The outlet is from
    the southern end, and pours its foaming stream through a narrow valley, from which the hills on either side rise steep ly. The little mills and shops which line this stream and use its water-power, and the rugged farms that climb these hill sides, compose the village of New Preston, which still, nes tled in the safe seclusion of woods and mountains, keeps much of its old character of remoteness from the world.

    The Bushnells chose their farm and fixed their home upon the southeastern slope of " a broad-backed hill, which stretches a mile upward and westward to a rounded summit, where stands the church." As this hill turns its back upon the lake, the view does not include the water, but is a wide outlook down the winding valley and across the rolling summits of the hills which, for ten miles, part it from that of the Housatonic. The farm lying on this sunny slope is a rough and rocky one one to tax the strength and patient skill of him who tilled it. " No ornamental rock-work is needed to set off the landscape. Nature s rock-work will stand, and the toil that is necessary to clear the soil is just what is requisite to sharpen the vigor of our people. The necessities of a rough country and an intractable soil are good necessities."
    This was the lesson of early experience as recalled by Horace Bushnell in manhood. the New Preston Academy was opened, in 1818

    Reports of cases adjudged in the Superior court of the state of ... - Google Books Result

    by Connecticut. Superior Court, Ephraim Kirby ... - 1898 - Law reports, digests, etc - 485 pages
    Adjudged insufficient for uncertainty. Society of South Farms v. ... the omission could only be pleaded in abatement. Northrop v. Brush, 108. ...
    books.google.com/books?id=uLEaAAAAYAAJ... -

    assault on northrop w pistols

     

    Litciifield, the shire town of the county, is 58 miles from Hartford, by rail, and has a population of about 3,000. The township is on high land, with strong soil. Bantam Lake, tire largest body of water in the county, is situated partly in this town. The village commands a beautiful and extensive prospect, and has a fine park in the centre, in which stands a monument to commemorate the lives of those who fell in the late war. The prominent buildings are the old court-house, with its turret and bell; the jail, and a new Congregational church edifice costing about $30,000. With its beautiful shade-trees, the village, at present, is a most delightful resort for those in quest of pleasure and recreation. The Lake-view House, capable of accommodating several hundred people, is a sightly place, and a favorite resort for metropolitan guests during the heated term. The city of New York, distant about 115 miles by rail, is reached by the Norwalk, Ilousatonic, Shepaug and Naugatuck railroads. The churches in the town are six

    in number; and there are two banks, one newspaper, and 20 public schools. Manufacturing is carried on to a greater or less extent at East Litchfield, Bantam Falls, Milton and Northfield.

    Among the eminent men of Litchfield have been Oliver Woleott (172C-97), the commander of a company in the French war, first sheriff of the county, delegate to Congress in 1775, and signer of the Declaration of Independence, and governor of the State at the time of his death; Benjamin Tallmadge (1754—1835), a colonel in the Revolutionary war, serving with distinction in many battles, several times a representative in Congress, and instrumental in causing the capture of Maj. Andre; Gen. Uriah Tracy (1755-1807), congressman and U. S. senator; Hon. O. S. Seymour, LL. D., former member of Congress and chief justice of the State; George C. Woodruff, formerly a member of Congress; Gideon H. Hollister, author of a standard history of Connecticut; Rev. Henry Ward Beecher; and Gov. Chas. B. Andrews.

    A history of New England - Google Books Result

    edited by R. H. Howard, Henry E. Crocker - 1879 - History
    The prominent buildings are the old court-house, with its turret and bell ... or less extent at East Litchfield, Bantam Falls, Milton and Northfield. ...
    books.google.com/books?id=8sRWAAAAMAAJ... -

     

     

    Northrup St
    Bridgewater, CT 06752


    maps.google.com

     

     

    Robert Alan Kraft's Genealogy Page

    C.S.Miller Journals
    John Northrop
    painted on shop. 08\03\{1887}(We) Spenser Monroe act 7.07 for July, for June 7.34, for. May 5.48. 08\04\{1887}(Th) Doctor came. ...... Connecticut's number to be sent is 1286 men. This morning ...... Shepanhg River 8 miles, then to Woodville ...... 7th 1778 to May{Mgg!} 25 1779, a fin_{fins?} monument ...
    ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rs/rak/gen/miller/journals.htm - Similar pages

    (VI) James Chamberlain, son of Rufus Cleveland, was born January 9, 1787, in East Windsor, Connecticut; died in Winsted, September i, 1875, aged eighty-eight. He married (first) in Winchester, Connecticut, February 3. 1813, Philenda, born in Winchester, August 29, 1793, died in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, May 19, 1814, daughter of Lewis and Mary (Allen) Miller. He married (second) in Hartland, Connecticut, September 19, 1816, Sally, born December 8, 1791, died in Winchester, December 27, 1819, daughter of Prince and Lucy (Adams) Taylor. He married (third), in Salisbury, Connecticut, August 21, 1820, Lucy Northrup, born April 20, 1798, died March 26, 1884, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Bradley) Northrup. Hon. James Chamberlain Cleveland removed to Philadelphia in 1813, and engaged in business selling groceries and clocks; also taught school six months. The early death of his wife greatly disheartened him, and he sold out his entire business, stock and fixtures, returning June, 1814, to Winsted, where he always dwelt afterward. He was a clock manufacturer and farmer. He represented his town in the legislature in 1834; was assessor for fifteen years, and filled several offices of trust with ability. He was of small size, had light hair and blue eyes. He was a man of few words, but of plain speech when occasion, required. He died after a short, but severe illness, universally esteemed and respected. His third wife survived him. Child of first marriage: Charles Miller, born May 4, 1814; children of third marriage: Jane, mentioned below; son, born and died April 28, 1825.

    (VII) Jane, daughter of James Chamberlain Cleveland, was born July 21, 1821, in Winsted, Connecticut, died in Winsted, August 29, 1888. She married in Winsted, May It, 1842, Charles Hamlin Blake (see Blake VI).

    (The Mitchell Line).New England families, genealogical and memorial By William Richard Cutter

    Stephen Northrup was born in Salisbury, Connecticut, in 1780, and died in Fulton Settlement in 1872. At the time of his decease, he was the last of the pioneers of his locality. He came to Bethel (prob NY)in May, 1807, and after viewing the country, concluded to go back to his birthplace. When he reached the Neversink, he met /Minimi Hawley, one of his old neighbors, who was. moving to Bethel with his family. Hawley was very glad to meet him; but sorry to learn that he was returning. After a conversation concerning their affairs, Northrup was led to alter his purpose once more, and again return to Fulton Settlement.

    This meeting took place on the east side of the Neversink. The river was very much swollen by the spring rains. There was no bridge, and the ford was impassable: at least Hawley did not dare to put his oxen, cart, wife and children in peril by attempting to cross in the usual manner. So he took the yoke from the necks of his cattle, and compelled them to swim over a short distance from the ford, where the water was smooth and deep. Then he unloaded his cart, took off its wheels and box, and conveyed or towed every thing to the opposite shore in or behind a log canoe! The task was difficult and dangerous: but was safely performed, and the adventurers proceeded on their way.
    * Adam, a ion of John Pintler, wag born May 2, 1805. and Eve Flutter was born October 7,1808. Both of these births preceded that of Catharine Fulton.

    They spent two days in traveling from the Neversink to the west-branch of the Mongaup. When they passed the latter, a heavy rain set in. Night was approaching, and they were in an almost trackless forest, far from human nabitation. The discomforts of the day were bad enough; but they were far exceeded by the prospective miseries of the night. The first care of the men was for the young mother and her two little children. With an axe they made the frame of a diminutive tent, which they covered with blankets. In this, Mrs. Hawley and the little ones passed the dismal night, while the men fared as well as they could under the dripping trees.
    On the third day they reached a clearing made by one of the Fultons, where they found a deserted cabin. Into this Hawley moved. Having thus piloted his friends to their new home, Xorthrup returned to Connecticut, and three weeks later came back with, his family. After occupying a temporary shelter for a few months, he moved to the place where he spent the remainder of his days. During the last fifty-six years of his life, his daily walk and conversation were in accord with the strict rules of the Presbyterian faith. He never sought to occupy a conspicuous position in this life; but was content with what was far better: the discharge, honestly and earnestly, of those duties which give life and beauty to Christian society.
    Joseph K. Northrup, a son of Stephen, was the first male child born hi Fulton Settlement.
    History of Sullivan County By James Eldridge Quinlan, Thomas Antisell

    NORTHROP, David of Sherman, CT & Clarissa Lee of Mt. Washington Dec. 30, 1811
    Stephen of Salisbury, CT & Rhoda Vosburg Feb. 7, 1803

    VITAL STATISTICS
    of
    SHEFFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

    Marrages 1797 to 1850

     

    A ndr us-Andrews

    Mary, of Amity, and Elijah Grant of Litchfield, March n, 1755.

    Jonathan, of Milford, and Eunice Baldwin of Amity, Apr. 20, 1758.

    Reuben, and Sarah Ailing, Feb. 5, 1770.

    Ebenezer, and Abigail Sperry, July 27, 1774.

    John, and Anna Collins, Oct. 7, 1779.

    Simeon, and Anna Northrop, April 12, 1780.

    Riverius, of Amity, and Rebecca Thompson of Amity, Jan. 15, 1786.

    Rhoda, of Amity, and Anson Clinton of Amity, June 5, 1793.

    Joseph, of Amity, and Eunice Johnson of Derby, Aug. 31, 1794.

    Richard, and Elizabeth Bolles of Branford, Aug. 26, 1795.

    Selina, of New Haven, and Seth Turner, Feb. 23, 1813.

    Polly, of Woodbridge, and Ranson Scovil, or Sperry of Waterbury, April,

    1816.
    Jedidiah, and Elizabeth Baldwin, May 21, 1745

     

    ALSO

    Auger

    Abraham, of Amity, and Elizabeth Bradley, May 21, 1745.

    Phebe, of Mt. Carmel, and Abraham Hotchkiss of Mt. Carmel, Feb. 7, 1769.

    Martha, of New Haven, and Joseph Beecher of Amity, Feb. 5, 1766.

    Austin Joshua, of East Haven, and Abigail Northrop of Woodbridge, July 25, 1787

    The Connecticut magazine By Harry Clemons, William Farrand Felch, George C. Atwell,

     

    Allyn Hays b: August 05, 1718 in Norwalk,Fairfield,CT d: September 12, 1784 in Salisbury,CT
    .................  +Joseph Northrop b: May 11, 1716

    St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Bridgewater.

      The record of the organization of St. Mark's Episcopal Society begins with a
    meeting held at the dwelling house of Jonas Sanford, on Easter Monday, April 23,
    1810, at which William Gillett and Julius Camp were chosen wardens, Daniel
    Booth, Jeremiah Platt, and James Jessup, vestrymen, William Gillett, reading
    clerk, Samuel Lockwood, treasurer; also David Merwin, Joseph Wheeler, Blackman Jessup, Jeremiah Canfield, Treat Canfield, Jehiel Summers, and John Treat were chosen choristers, and Joel Sanford was elected to attend the State Convention within the year.

      The service was held at the dwellings of the several members, but more frequently at the house of Jonas Sanford, by lay-readers and neighboring ministers, for nearly twenty years, when an effort was made to build a house of worship. The site was located near the old burying-place west of where they finally built their first house, and the timber for the frame was collected at that place, but the question of the location or something of the kind caused the work to cease, and the matter was delayed some time. In 1835, the first house was erected about half a mile south of the present village, in the field, and afterwards a highway was made past it for the accommodation of the people. This building is still standing, is two stories high, and in a beautiful location. Soon after this the village began to increase in dwellings and population, and to become a center of trade, in consequence of the increase of the business of manufacturing hats, particularly by Glover Sanford, and this house of worship was found to be inconveniently located. Hence, in 1859 anew edifice was erected in the village where it now stands, which was consecrated March 14, 1860, by the Rt. Rev. John Williams.

      Among those ministers who officiated here before a house of worship was erected, are the names of Rev. B. Northrop, the Rev. Benjamin Benham of New Milford, and the Rev. Joseph S. Covel. Since 1835 the church has been under the pastoral charge of the following clergymen: Revs. Joseph S. Covel, Abel Nichols, George H. Nichols, William Atwell, Abel Ogden, William O. Jarvis, H. F. M. Whitesides, Abel Nichols, Merritt H. Wellman, William H. Cook, James Morton, H. D. Noble, X. Alanson Welton, W. B. Colburn, D.D., and G. V. C. Eastman, D.D., who resigned and removed to the West in 1882.

      The officers of the parish at the present time are: Jeremiah G. Randall, Eli Sturdevant, Wardens; Arza C. Morris, Albert B. Mallett, and Amos Northrop,
    Vestrymen (in 1882);
    Arza C. Morris, Treasurer; Jeremiah G. Randall, Delegate to Convention; and Eli Sturdevant, Clerk.

    Northrop, Sarah of Ammete (Amity
    ) and Hezekiah Camp Jr. of Sal., m
    Nov. 21, 1752, by Rev. Mr. Woodbridge, Pastor.

    Northrup, Abi, d. of Joseph Jr. and Mary, b. Feb. 13, 1767.

    Northrup, Annah and Abijah Rood, both of Sal., m. Aug. 22,
    1763, by John Hutchinson, J. P.
    See under A. Rood.

    Northrup, Elisabeth, d. of Joseph and Allen, b. in Ridgefield,
    Dec. 4, 1756.

    Northrup, Eunice, d. of Joseph and Allen, b. in Ridgefield, May

    3, 1755-
    Northrup, Jeremiah, s. of Joseph and Allen, b. in Ridgefield, Jan.

    8, 1759; d. Sept. 29, 1762, in his 4th year.
    Northrup, Jeremiah, s. of Samuel and Phebe, b. Feb. 12, 1765.
    Northrop, Mary, d. of Joseph Jr. and Mary, b. Feb. 17, 1765.
    Northrup, Phebe, d. of Samuel and Phebe, b. Feb. 19, 1766.

    Historical collections relating to the town of Salisbury, Litchfield county, Connecticut"

     

    ANDRUS NORTHROP is this ANDREW??

    he society of Newbury was organized into a town in 1788, and named Brookfield.

      The Assessors' list for that part of Newbury society which was contained within New Milford township in 1787, the last year the assessment was made before the town of Brookfield was organized, contained the following names:

    Josiah Burritt,
    Albert Barlow,
    Amarillis Barlow,
    Francis Burritt,
    Mitchel Barlow,
    Thaddeus Baldwin,
    Edward Beech,
    Tibbals Baldwin,
    Samuel Baldwin's heirs,
    Jonathan Beecher,
    Robert Bostwick,
    Enoch Buckingham,
    Sarah Camp,
    Theophilus Comstock,
    Ephraim Curtiss,
    Dea. Abraham Camp,
    Achilles Comstock,
    Levi Camp,
    Thomas Gushing, Esqr.,
    John Dunning,
    Isaac Hawley, Jr.,
    Liverius Hawley,
    Clement Hubbell,
    Benjamin Hawley,
    Nehemiah Hawley,
    Isaac Hawley,
    David Jackson,
    Ralph Keeler,
    Jonathan Keeler,
    David Keeler,
    Isaac Lockwood,
    Andrew Lake's heirs,
    Samuel Merwin, Jr.,
    Samuel Merwin,
    Nathan Merwin,
    Isaac Merwin,
    Andrew Merwin,
    Levi Merwin,
    John Morehouse,
    Isaac Northrop,
    Elnathan Noble,
    Wait Northrop,
    Joseph Nearing,
    Henry Nearing.
    John H. Nearing,
    William Nichols,
    Joshua Northrop,
    Andrus Northrop,

    Jesse Noble,
    James Osborn,
    Israel Osborn,
    Joseph Olmsted,
    Richard Olmsted,
    Henry Peck, Esqr.,
    David Peck,
    Amiel Peck,
    Ammi Palmer,
    Joseph Ruggles, Jr.,
    Comfort Ruggles,
    Artemus Ruggles,
    Benjamin Ruggles,
    Timothy Ruggles, Esqr.,
    Ashbel Ruggles,
    Samuel Ruggles,
    Hezekiah Stevens, Jr.,
    John Starr,
    David Smith,
    Joseph Smith,
    James Starr,
    Rufus Sherman,
    Samuel Sherman,
    Thomas Smith,
    Elijah Starr,
    Jehiel Smith,
    Joseph Tomlinson,
    John Veal,
    David Wakelee,
    Samuel Wakelee,
    Amos Wakelee,
    Martin Warner,
    Solomon Warner,
    Daniel Wheeler.

    Litchfield County CT Archives History - 
    Books .....Newbury Society 1882

     

    (The Gunn Line). JohnNorthhrop Gunn

    (I) Jasper Gunn, immigrant ancestor, came
    to New England in the ship "Defiance," in
    1635, then aged twenty-nine years. He settled
    in Roxbury, Massachusetts, where he was a
    proprietor of the town, and was admitted a
    freeman. May 25, 1636. He removed to Mil-
    ford, Connecticut, but was living in Hart-
    ford, Connecticut,^ in 1648. He settled finally,
    however, in Milford. In 1649 '^c was "freed
    from watching during the time that he attends
    the service of the mill." In 1636 he is called
    a physician in the public records. He was
    deacon of the church in Milford and perhaps
    school master, and on one occasion appeared
    before the court in the capacity of attorney.
    He was a deputy to the general court and an
    extremely active and versatile citizen. He
    married Sarah Hawley. He died January 12,
    1671. Children: Samuel: Jebomah, men-
    tioned below ; Daniel, married Deborah Cole-
    man
    and died in 1690: Nathaniel, settled in
    Branford ; Mehitable, baptized in 1641 ; Abel,
    baptized in 1643, '* physician at Derby, Con-
    necticut.

    (II) Jebomah, son of Jasper Gunn, was
    born 1641. He was also a resident of Mil-
    ford. He married, in 1660, Sarah Lane.
    Among their children was Captain Samuel,
    mentioned below.

    (III) Captain Samuel Gunn, son of Jebo-
    mah Gunn, was born in Milford in 1669, died
    there in 1749. He married, in 1698, Mercy
    Smith. Among their children was Lieutenant
    Samuel, mentioned below.

    (IV) Lieutenant Samuel (2) Gunn, son of
    Captain Samuel (i) Gunn, was born at Mil-
    ford, January 15, 1701, died in 1756. He mar-
    ried Sarah Clark, who was born October 24,
    1706. Among their children was Samuel,
    mentioned below.

    (V) Samuel (3), son of Lieutenant Samuel (2) Gunn, was born in Milford in 1740, died
    in Washington, January 7, 1782. He settled at Woodbury, Connecticut. He married Phebe
    Northrop, born April, 1735, a descendant of Joseph Northrop, a founder of Milford.
    Among their children was John Northrop,
    mentioned below.

    (VI) John Northrop, son of Samuel (3) Gunn, was born at Milford, June 5, 1772, died
    in Washington, October 3, 1826. He was a farmer, but for many years held and discharged the duties of deputy sheriff, an office then held in much honor, which he so accept ably filled that he became widely known and still lives in local tradition as "Sheriff" Gunn. He married, at Washington, Connecticut, October 25, 1797, Polly Ford, born June 19, 1773, at Milford, died January 15, 1827. She was highly esteemed for her goodness and refine ment and for her ready kindness and skill in nursing the sick. She was the daughter of Samuel and Susannah (Stone) Ford. Fler grandfather, Samuel Ford, died 1760, was son of John Ford, born 1654, died 171 1, and grandson of Thomas Ford, who came from England and died at Milford in May, 1662.
    Children of John Northrop and Polly Gunn : John Northrop, born August i, 1798: Louisa,
    March 3, 1800: Susan, October 10. 1801 : Abby, November 30, 1804; Lewis, November
    30, 1806; Sarah, October i, 1809; Amaryllis. September 14, 181 1 ; Frederick William, men-
    tioned below.

    (VII) Frederick W'ilIiam, son of John Northrop Gunn, was born at Washington, formerly Woodbury, Connecticut. October 4, 1818, died August "19, 1881. At the age of thirteen he began to attend a school in Cornwall kept by Rev. William Andrews. He prepared for college in 1831-32 at Judea Academy, then taught by Rev. Watson Andrews, son of Rev. William Andrews, and he .grad- uated from Yale College in the class of 1837. He taught in the academy at New Preston during the winters of 1837-38 ; in the Judea Academy, 1839-43 ; in the New Preston Academy, 1845-47 : in Towanda, Pennsylvania, 1847-48-49. He established the famous private school at Washington, i^>49. ami il came to be known as the Gunnery, in his lionor. It is at tile ijrescnt time one of tlic foremost preparatory schools of the country, of national fame, lie was Master nf the Gunnery from 1S49 t"i 1881. As a thinker an«I teacher, Mr. Gunn was far in advance of his time; in his schcx>l and town he exercised a powerful influence for the good of the community. The gratitude and reverence of his inijiils are ex- pressed in the book written and published by tlieiu. entitled " Ihe Master of the Gunnery."
    The people of Washington have shown their appreciation of his life and work among them
    by erecting the Gunn Memorial Library, a beautiful building which stands on a corner
    of Washington Green. It is described fur-
    ther ill the account of .\bigail Brinsmade
    Gunn elsewhere in this work. Mr. Gunn was
    alwa)s a strong supporter of the Ecclesiasti-
    cal Society of the First Congregational
    Church of Washington, of which his wife and
    dan;.;lilir were members. lie married, at
    \\ .i-iington, .\pril 16. 1848, .Abigail Irene
    Iiriii>inade, born at Washington, July 18,
    1820, died September 13, \C)oS, daughter of
    Daniel liourbon and Mary Wakeman (Gold)
    Brin>-made (see Drinsmade XTII). Children:
    I. Daniel Drinsmade, Kirn January 9, 1849, at
    Towanda, I'cnnsylvania, died .\pril 19. 1S65,
    at Washington. 2. Mary Gold, January 20,
    185.V at Washinu,'ton : married, October 4,
    187^1, John Chapiii I'.rinsniade (see Brins-
    made IX (.

     

    (V) Captain Isaac Gallup, son
    G.ALLUr of Captain John Gallup (q. v.),
    was Iwrn in X'oluniown. Con-
    necticut, the iiart now called Sterling, I'ebru-
    ary 24, 1712. He lived on his father's home-
    stead, and was prominent in town and church
    affairs. He representc<] the town in the gen-
    eral court from I7(>8 until 1773. He served
    in the revolutionary war, being lieutenant
    under Captain .\hel Spencer, of Grotoii. in the
    Tenth Company, Sixth Regiment. Colonel
    Samuel Ilolden Parsons. He served in Bos-
    ton and Connecticut. In 1776 he served in
    New York and Loni: Island campaigns, and
    was in the battles of Long Island an<l White
    Plains, under Colonel I'arsons. He was cap-
    tain of the Groton company. He also fought
    '" '777. I'is name being on the Connecticut
    rolls, pages 78-0(^100 and r>i8. He married
    Margaret, daughter of Nathaniel and Mar-
    prct Gallup, of Stonington, March 29. 1748.
    She was born October 12, 1730, died Decem-
    ber 9, 1817. He died .\ugust 3. 1791^ Chil-
    dren: John. l)orn December 29. 1749: Eliza-
    beth. January 22, 1755; Martha, Eebruary 17,

     

    Full text of "Genealogical and family history of the state of Connecticut; a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation"

    Paula Krimsky, Archivist
    krimskyp@gunnery.org
    860-868-7334 ext. 251

    In the year 1779, the township of Washington was formed in the County of Litchfield, and within its limits were included the lands owned by the Davies family, and it is recorded that on the 12th day of April, 1779, a number of the inhabitants took the oath of allegiance to the States, in open Freemen's Meeting.
    Among the names of those who, by the list given in the record, pledged themselves to the cause of the Revolution, we look in vain to find a single Davies, a fact which shows the steadfastness with which the whole family clung to their traditions of loyalty, although, possibly, it may not commend them to the patriotic feelings of their descendants.
    It had been the custom of Mr. John Davies to present annually to the Rev. Mr. Marshall, of Woodbury, a fat cow, and this he continued with great difficulty to do during the whole period of the war, although to accomplish this purpose in those times, it was necessary, as he has told, to take the animal by night, and by a long and circuitous route, to avoid being intercepted and robbed by those of the opposite political faith, in whose judgment a gift to an Episcopal clergyman was a treasonable offense. An instance of his generosity and kindness, which never failed even in those trying times, appears from an anecdote that is told in the biography of his youngest son, the Rev. Thomas Davies. After the close of the war a man who had taken an active part in driving off a number of cattle from his farm, and had committed other acts of plunder, having become destitute, applied for relief in his extremity to Mr. Davies, who not only pardoned him for the wrongs he had done, but liberally relieved his wants

    After the close of the war, Mr. Davies' life was passed quietly and peacefully at his home, surrounded by his family, the greater part of whom depended upon him for support, and lived at or near the family homestead. His sons, John and William, had been ruined by the confiscation of their property during the war, and the latter had taken refuge in Canada.

    He still had in mind his father's wish that an Episcopal Church should be built at Birch Plains, upon the lands of the Davies family, and late in life he succeeded in accomplishing this object, as is told in Cothren's " History of Ancient Woodbury."


    After the separation of what was called Birch Plains or Davies Hollow from the township, the Davies family, one of considerable note and zealously attached to the Church, withdrew from the Litchfield Parish, and built a church edifice of their own in Davies Hollow, where, with assistance from some few families, who resided near, they sustained religious services according to the Liturgy of the Church of England, and kept up a distinct parochial organization, for a considerable period. The following is a copy of the Deed given by John Davies, father of Rev. Thomas Davies, to the Churchmen in Washington, making to them a conveyance of the lands upon which the house of worship was erected :" Know ye that I, John Davies, of that part of Washington formerly belonging to Litchfield, and known and called by the name of Birch Plains, in the County of Litchfield, for the consideration of an agreement or promise, made with and to my honored father, John Davies, late of Birch Plains, in said Litchfield, deceased, and for the love and affection I have and bear toward the people of the Church of England now in said town of Washington, and for securing and settling the service and worship of God among us, according to the usage of our most excellent Episcopal Church, whenever there shall be one legally organized in said Washington, and at all times forever hereafter, do therefore demise," etc., eta
    The measurement of the land as described in the deed must have been equal to ninety-six square poles, and it was restricted to use as a public burying- ground, and for the purpose of having a suitable place of worship erected upon it The same condition was annexed to it as that which was expressed in the deed given by his father to the church in Litchfield, viz.: the requirement of one peppercorn to be paid annually on the feast of St Michael the Archangel, if demanded. The above deed was given on the 2id of January, 1794. Upon this ground, principally at his own expense, an Episcopal Church subsequently was erected. Aged and infirm, and seated in an arm-chair at the door of his boose, he witnessed the raising of the edifice, with a feeling similar to that of the pious Simeon when he said, "Lord, now lettest thon thy servant depart in peace." He survived about three years, and at the age of eighty-six years he died on the 19th day of May, 1797, and was buried in the family burial-ground in Davies Hollow.

     

    John Davies, Jr.,

    Jokl Titus,

    Samuel P. Treat,

    Jakes J. Davies,

    Walter Davies,

    David Davies,

    George Davies,

    Abraham Woster,

    John Hull,

    William Lyons.

    St. John's Church, Washington, CT (birch Plains/Davies Hollow area) moved in 1815 to the town of washington

     

    From Sketches of Litchfield 1818 Litchfield as Lister

    Listers or Rate Makers From 1721 to 1819 At the later date, Assessors were substututed - the dutiees of the twoo office being much the same.

     

    1817 Northrop, Abner 7

     

    Joshua Garritt of Hartford listed as a first settler of Litchfield

     

    The first French war began in 1744

    Some Acadians (from Nova Scotia were distributed throughourt the Connecticut towns often separating families)

    "Last" French war began in 1755 an Litchfield was activelu involved

     

    The Underground Railroad in Litchfield County

    (And surrounding areas)





    This is information I have gleaned from reading area history books, talking with people, etc. If you have anything to add, any references I missed, any family oral traditions, I would appreciate hearing from you. I will include them in this page with your permission. Thank you.


    I am also working on a book, and this is only a fraction of the information that I have. Any help you can give, any information, even the slightest, would be most appreciated. I am interested not only in Litchfield County but any surrounding areas.


    -Quotes from "The Underground Railroad in Connecticut" by Horatio T. Strother, 1962.

    -p. 121-122- " As a conductor, Wakeman (of Norwalk), was bold and tireless, taking his "packages of hardware and dry good" to places as distant as Plymouth and Middletown - trips of forty and fifty miles as the crow flies, farther than that by road....

    -p. 122- "The Plymouth operators, to whom Wakeman presumably made his deliveries, included Joel Blakeslee, Ferrand Dunbar, and William Bull. They not only handled passengers from Wilton; they also had to keep watch for unaccompanied fugitives on foot who had lost their way on the western line between New Haven and Farmington. The Plymouth "minute men" had to set these wanderers on the right track, which took them a dozen miles eastward to Farmington."

    -p. 123 -Thus it is known that New Milford was a center of Underground work; but whether fugitives came to this town by traveling northward from the vicinity of Wilton, or eastward via a lateral from the Hudson River line in New York, or both, remains unclear."

    -"There are several stations here, (New Milford), one of which was the house of Charles Sabin. Another was the home of Augustine Thayer. He and "his good wife devoted their lives to the Abolition cause. They helped many poor slaves on their way, rising from their beds in the night to feed and minister to them and secreting them till they could be taken under cover of darkness to Deacon Geradus Roberts' house on Second Hill and from there to Mr. Daniel Platt's house in Washington."

    -p. 123-124 - Frederick W. Gunn of Washington, Connecticut, who founded the private school bearing his name, "The direction or runaways on the road to freedom, however, remained Gunn's private affair.

    -p. 124-"Daniel Platt and his wife....accomodating "many a trembling black refugee" on their farm. ...Their son, Orville,...later recalled that "the slaves stayed, as a rule, but a short time, though some remained several weeks until it was learned through the channels of communication among the Abolitionists that their whereabouts was suspected." They were then forwarded to either of two destinations - to Dr. Vaill on the Wolcottville Road or to Uriel Tuttle in Torrington."

    -p. 124-125 - "Yet, curiously, Uriel Tuttle was the only Underground stationmaster here of whom a record survives.

    -p. 125- "At Winchester, a few miles north of Torrington and close to Winsted, there was a small but active antislavery society. Noble J. Everett was its secretary; Jonathan Coe, a member who lived in nearby Winsted, managed a well-patronized Underground station at his house. Another station many have been the home of Silas H. McAlpine, poet, philanthropist, and abolitionist of Winchester; in the foundation wall of his house was a hidden crypt that was possibly a hiding place for fugitives, but there is no positive evidence that it was so used."

    -p 126 - "Beyond this point, there were stations to the north in Colebrook and to the northwest in Norfolk. Who were the Undergroung agents in Colebrook remains unknown, but there were certainly several of them. One may have been J. H. Rodgers, secretary of the ninety-member antislavery society in 1836.

    -"It is also reported that there was a network of Underground byways in this vicinity and that residents of Norfolk were responsible for paving many of them."

    -p. 126-127- " For the fugitive traveling through northwestern Connecticut, Norfolk was the last stop in the state. From here, he was sent across the Massachusetts border to New Marlboro, thence over to the Housatonic River line through Stockbridge and Pittsfield to Bennington, Vermont."

    -from Appendix 2 - "Underground Railroad Agents in Connecticut" (Probable agents are indicated by *) Litchfield County Blakeslee, Joel - Plymouth Bull, William - Plymouth Coe, Jonathan - Winsted Dunbar, Daniel - Plymouth McAlpine, Silas H. * - Winchester Pettibone, Amos - Norfolk Roberts, Geradus - New Milford Sabin, Charles - New Milford Thayer, Augustine - New Milford Tuttle, Uriel - Torrington


    -Quotes from "Barkhamsted Heritage-Culture and Industry in a Rural Connecticut Town", edited by Richard G. Wheeler and George Hilton, 1975.

    -p. 235 - "Lamont's Christmas Tree Plantation - Located at the site of one of Barkhamsted's earliest houses, which saw use as an inn on the route from the Salisbury iron works toward Granby.....The house, known 50 years ago as the Oscar Tiffany place, was bought in 1952 by Thomas and Marguerite Lamont...Legend has it that the house was also a stop on the Underground Railroad."


    Scan of Colebrook River, from an old postcard
    (Kind of tickles me, Cotton Mill in town and they were hiding slaves?)

    -Quotes from "Colebrook Stories", by Alan DeLarm, 1979.

    -"Chamberlain's hotel, The Colebrook River Inn, was at one time used as a station in the underground railroad." -"The Davidson house on the Old Colebrook Road is also said to have been an underground railroad station."


    -Quotes from "Howard Peck's New Milford - Memories of a Connecticut Town", edited by James E. Dibble, 1991.


    -p. 58-60- "Seventy-five years after the Bostwick place was erected it became one of the stations on the Underground Railroad. It is known that there was a hiding place beneath the floor of the attic. This compartment could hold two persons, and as it was near a chimney could provide warmth during the cold winter season. ..."

    -"Another alleged station in this system was a home in the Lanesville section of this town. It is located about four miles south of the village center and has been known as the Wanzer Farm......(they were Quakers)"

    -"Fugitives from slavery in the deep South entered New Milford at several places. Some were directed from New York State, directly west of New Milford. It would seem natural that they might have entered through the Town of Sherman, although little has been written or recorded as to that being the case. However, it has been stated that one known station on the system was in Sherman, a short distance north of the center of town in an old colonial residence lying on the westerly side of the present road leading north from the center toward the New York State line or to Gaylordsville. This station was in the Stuart family. The residence is still standing, a landmark and heritage to be preserved. James Stuart was reportedly the agent. It is alleged that there was a small out-building on the premises just north of his dwelling where the escapees would be housed and it would seem likely that some of them would come over the hills to New Milford."

    -"Again, near the village, was the home of Augustine A. Thayer, known to his cronies as "Baccus."....from a New York newspaper....a reward of five hundred dollars offered for the apprehension of two runaway slaves. It was expressed by one of the men present that it would not surprise him, "if they would be found at that moment at Baccus' home."

    -"Many of the fugitives were aided over the hills to Washington, about five or six miles east of New Milford. One of the most ardent supporters of the movement there was Frederick W. Gunn. ...With Mr. Gunn was Daniel Platt, as devoted an agent on the system as there was anywhere. Mr. Platt and his wife rescued and aided many a poor soul fleeing to Canada."

    -"The route continued from Washington north to Litchfield, then on to Torrington, which was the birthplace of John Brown. It is reported that as early as 1837 there was an organization composed of forty members of an antislavery group in that town. Colebrook and Norfolk were the actual jumping off places in Connecticut. From these towns the fugitives crossed the line into Massachusetts, crossed the Housatonic River to Stockbridge, to Pittsfield, into Vermont, to Bennington, Burlington, Rutland, and on into Canada and freedom."


    Underground Railroad notes from various sources:

    When the first pages of my web site were posted, I received an email from someone (I wish that person, if they ever read this, would get back in contact with me) that mentioned that the Christmas shop in the town of Bethlehem was used to hide runaway slaves. If I remember correctly, I was told it was a printing shop and the slaves would spend the night there before moving on to the next station, most likely in Litchfield.

    I heard from a friend that a home north of the rotary in Goshen was a station in the 1800's. I quote from the Goshen history, 1897, page 363: "The store built and occupied by Wadhams and Thompson, and later by Moses Wadhams, was purchased by A. Miles and Sons, who also had a store at West Goshen. Moses W. Gray entered their employ as clerk, in 1841. At this time, Mr. MIles and one son lived at West Goshen, and another son at the Center, with whom Mr. Gray boarded. At his death, Mr. Gray managed the store for about three years, when he purchased a one-half interest and continued to manage it for several years under the firm name of Miles and Gray. He then purchased the interest of his partner and conducted the business alone, the sign over the door bearing the name of M. W. Gray. In 1857, he sold his stock of goods, and, removing to Chicago, enaged in the wholesale grocery business......" -I have talked to a previous landowner, and he told me there is a room in the basement that is undetectable, unless you know it is there. Convienent having a freight business with a hidden room for that special cargo.

    I also heard that a house in South Kent has "extra rooms" on the fireplace foundation in the basement. I know which house, but nothing more than that.

    Another reference I have, and have no idea where it came from, is Blueberry Hill Farm, between Norfolk and Colebrook, on Rock Hall Road. Supposedly there are false panels behind the fireplace, concealing an entrance to another room.

    Mentioned in a Register Citizen article, (I didn't get the date), the Cook homestead on Charles Street in Torrington was used as a station. Runaways were hidden in a section of a dining room closet.

    Also, a Register Citizen article, dated 12-31-94, by Bryan T. Morytko, mentions the following: Harwinton - Rt. 4, the Chiarmonte and the Hinnan houses, the Hinnan home have a secret place in the attic floor, next to a chimney, large enough for three people. Torrington - Torringford Street (very active antislavery society in this area) - three or four houses on this street, including the Florian home, with a secret basement room Winchester - the Silas H. McAlpine home (already mentioned above)


    These are notes about Underground Railroad sites from visitors to my web site. Some are not exactly in northwestern Connecticut, but close enough.

    (Every little piece of the puzzle helps!)

    From Kevin Purcell, of Fairbanks, Alaska: "I can remember two houses in Northern Westchester that were rumored to be stops on the Underground. One is located on Route 138 east of Goldens Bridge, it is a large colonial just before the Increase Miller Elementary School on the north side of the road. The other is on Route 100 south of Somers, New York. It is a larger stone house that had one of the old stone mile markers out front."


    New quote - added August 29, 1999

    -from "Mysteries and Histories of Goshen", June 21, 1938, by Mrs. Lora Ives. Handwritten manuscript

    -"At my father's place, known as Whist Pond Manor......The Manor house was built in 1772 by Nathaniel Parmelee. It contained a secret chamber by the great stone chimney, to which access was easy from the downstairs closet, under the stairs in the front hall, by moving a board in the ceiling, also by a movable panel in a shallow closet upstairs, and by a loose board in the attic floor. The chimney kept the room warm in winter and it is supposed to have been used to secrete English refugees in Colonial days, also for runaway slaves during and before the Civil War. The place called Bald Ledge where the Sterlings lived for several years at the north end of the street, is said to have a similar room."

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    Elijah Serman Woodbury known as Father Sherman was Episcopal became dissatisfied and joined the methodists (1812 became a class leaader). He wwas active and zealous and encourage the groth of and a meetinghouse was built 1824

    At bridgewater is the junction with state 67 left on state 67 winding over the hills to the shepaug river ad Roxbury station at 2.9 miles onthe left (dirt road Mine Hill 1750 mine opened hpoing to find silver later run as an iron mine -- large perfect pyrite crystals can be found and other minerals in small crystals -- it is an ore vein along a fault.) nothe of roxbury station state 67 crosses a concrete bridge and passes pulpit rock L 3.1 miat the river's edge ehind a barnwhere John Eliot, apostle to the indians, is believe to hhave preached his Gospel of Peace State 67 swings sharpe R and combines with state 199 at 4.6 mi

    Left on state 199 is Washington Green 4.5 mi (see tour 4c) traversing a region rich in old houses , fragrant with sweet rocket in season, this is a pleasant journey for any travelkers with time to spare for leisurely exploration.

    ROXBURY

    route 67 5.3 mi was the home of Ethan Allen, Seth Warner (hero of Crown Point)and Remember Baker. [Rigt from Roxbury Green, rte 199 at 2.8 mi Roxbury Falls, ]

    at Roxbury green, state 67 swings right to the valley of Jack's Brook, a trout stream winding toward the Shepaug.

    (Transylvania -- Southbury/Roxbury Road Route 67)

    At 10 m. is the Transylvania Crossroads, locally known as Pine Tree . At transylvania is the junction with State 172. -- Right at State 172 .3 mi, under the hilll at the west of the highway is an unusual building probably the oldest n the South Britain Society hald wood, half stone.

     

    Route 47 is Woodbury/Washington Road

     

    1740 woodbury maybe towards southbury which was a part of woodbury at the time, several families Masters, Castle, Squire, Warner Ward, were early among those who adopted Episcopal opinions.a church was erected on the hill between Rosbury and Transylvania near the old graveyard.

    another episcopal church was erected in the ancient limits of the township of woodbury at Judea, now Washington, in Davis Hollow.(There is a davis Road in East Kent near spectacle ponds.)

     

    The woodbury church( Episcopal), St. Paul';s Church Woodbury, members of the parish living in southbury, Bethlem and middlebury --Wheelers, Benham, Osborne of Southbury, Doct Hull and Prentices of Bethlem. In 1791 the Rev Mr. Sayre was opposed to the adpotion of the state constitution. It was apparently a bitter controversy which included imputations on the Bishpo and clergy and left a mark even after Sayre left. The committee of the convention inclcuded MessrsPhillip, Perry, Truman, Marsh and Ives.the constitution was accepted in Nov 1794.IOt was during this controversy that Mr. Elijah Sherman left the Episcopal church for the methodist "He could not adopt Calvinistic opinions then ardentluy pressedin all the Congregational pulpits:.for 20 years worshipers gathered at his house.He lived to see the erection of a methodist church at his own homestead.

    Later led by Rev S. G Hitchcock. After 1801 the number of worshipers dwindled to almost noone. But increased again after 1809.

    List Of Clergymen Who Have Officiated In St. Paul's Church, Woodburv.

    Commencement. Termination.

    November, 1771, Rev. John Rutgers Marshall, died January 7th, 17S9.

    1790, " JaruesSayre, 1791.

    1791, " Seth Flint, 1793. 1793, " Reuben Ives, 1797. 1797, " Tillotson Bronson, D. D., 1798. 1799, " Bethel Judd, D. D.. August, 1SOI.

    Easter, 1S09, " Joseph D. Welton, June, 1818.

    August, 1816, " Sturges Gilbert, August, 1827.

    1S27, " Bennett Glover, 1827.

    List Of Clergymen Who Have Officiated In St. Paul's Church, Woodburv.
    Commencement. Termination.
    November, 1771, Rev. John Rutgers Marshall, died January 7th, 17S9.
    1790, " JarmesSayre, 1791.
    1791, " Seth Flint, 1793. 1793, " Reuben Ives, 1797.
    1797, " Tillotson Bronson, D. D., 1798.
    1799, " Bethel Judd, D. D.. August, 18OI.
    Easter, 1809, " Joseph D. Welton, June, 1818.
    August, 1816, " Sturges Gilbert, August, 1827.
    1827, " Bennett Glover, 1827.

    November, 1827, Rev. Samuel Fuller, Jr., D. D, April, 1S98.

    1S2S, " William H. Judd, 1828.

    November, 182S, " William Lucas, . 1829.

    1829, " Ulysses M. Wheeler, 1830.

    1831, " Daniel Hurhans, D. D., July, 1831.

    July, 1S31, « Joseph Scott, April, 1S33.

    1834, " _ John Dowdney, 1838.

    Easter, 1835, " Edmund C. Bull, Easter, 1S36.

    July, 1S36, " P. Teller Babbitt, March, 1S37.

    May, 1837, " Solomon G. Hitchcock, August, 1S44.

    October, 184-4, " Richard Coxe, November, 1845.

    November, 1845, " David P. Sanford, February, 1847.

    Easter, 1847, " Charles S. Putnam, April, 1848.

    June, 1849, «' P. Teller Babbitt, September, 1850.

    October, 1850, " Robert C. Rogers, January, 1853.

    May, 1853, " F. D. Harrimon.

    The following persons born in this parish, and receiving their religious impressions and culture in the Episcopal church, have been ordained priests and officiated as such :

    Rev. Phillips Perry, Rev. "William Preston,

    " Philo Perry, « Martin Moody,

    " James Thompson, " Thaddeus Leavenworth,

    " Rufus Murray, " Henry B. Sherman.

     

    notes to Woodbury Episcopal Church and Woodbury Methodis church 6/22/09

     

    Militia during the first 2 years o the was able bodied men between the ages ofd sixteen and fifty. Early In 1777 enlistements of three years or during the war were called for and the quota for each town established. It was a severe levy on the already weakened strength of the towns. Large bounties were offered for those who would enlist and neavy taxes laid on the property of inhabitants who were not liable for military duty or did not enlist.
    • Name: Sarah HUBBELL
    • Given Name: Sarah
    • Surname: Hubbell
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 22 Jun 1770
    • Change Date: 26 Aug 2003 1



      Marriage 1 William BURR b: 23 Jan 1762
      Children
      1. Has No Children Avis BURR b: 26 May 1797 in Of Southbury, New Haven, Ct

     

    Children of Heth Northrup and Anna Newton are:
    + 160   i. Newton Northrop was born 26 MAY 1781 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 6 JAN 1858.
      161   ii. Elizabeth Ann Northrup was born 7 MAY 1783 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died UNKNOWN in Morris, Connecticut. She married Job Smith 7 JAN 1803, son of Caleb Smith and . He was born ABT. 1781, and died UNKNOWN.

    The accumulation of unwelcome tasks meant months of dismal drudgery to Senator Platt. Just how great a sacrifice it all was to him may be gleaned from his correspondence. Congress adjourned the last week in June, and he hurried home to Judea for such rest as he could get. Writing from there to John H. Flagg he says:

    My summer seems already broken up. I have to enjoy this place thinking about it when I am far away from it. If there is anything that will bring you health, enjoyment, and happiness it is this Litchfield County life. I have read first and last a good many entertaining disquisitions on where the Garden of Eden was located, but it seems strange that in all the places that have been claimed for it between the North and South Poles, no one has ever said Litchfield County, but I am sure that this was the original paradise. Norfolk is rather on the outer edge of it. Washington, and especially the Judea end of Washington, was right in the centre of the garden. I do not think that the tree of knowledge of good and evil where Eve cut up such a prank at the instance of Old Nick was just hereabouts. I think she must have wandered out of the garden a little to find the tree; for every tree here is pleasant to the sight and good for food.

    But that summer was to be a busy one, with little in it of the peace of Judea. Not only was he burdened with the work of analyzing Cuban finances but he was called upon as usual to bear his part in the Presidential campaign which resulted in the election of McKinley and Roosevelt. When he returned to Washington at the beginning of the short session in December he was weary rather than rested by this summer's absence; but the session upon which he was about to enter proved to be one of the most exhausting, as it was perhaps the most momentous of his entire career.

     

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT

    Litchfield, Connecticut


    The Town of Washington encompasses the following Villages:

    Washington Depot

    Washington (or Washington Green) --  the Old Judea

    New Preston --  located on the Aspetuck River.

    Marbledale (or Marble Dale)


    Geology:

    Washington sits on Green Hill overlooking the winding Shepaug River.  Washington Depot lies along the Shepaug River at the foot of Green Hill. 

    26 miles of the Shepaug River here are deemed "wild."


    History:  (information about Washington Depot overrepresented)

     

    1734 – the eastern section of Washington was settled by Joseph Hurlbut. It was known as the Parish of Judea and belonged to Woodbury.
    The western section was known as the Parish of New Preston and belonged to New Milford.
    Nettleton Hollow, Romford and Smoky Hollow belong to Litchfield. 

    1740  --  the Titus family settled on Lower Church Hill.

    1741 -- the western section, part of the New Milford North Purchase, was first settled.

    1741  --  Judea Parish gathered. 

    1746 – Edward Cogswell secured the right to mine iron ore in the New Milford North Purchase. The Iron Works, the first industry in the North Purchase, was established along the Aspetuck River, near the foot of the road leading to New Preston hill.

    1746 – land purchased from the Indians for the building of the Averill Homestead (on Baldwin Hill Road about 1.5 miles from New Preston). The Averill family still lives there. 

    as early as 1748  --  1.5 miles downstream from Factory Hollow, the South Shepaug Factory Complex (consisting of a sawmill and gristmill and first known as Platt's Mills then Baldwin-Olmstead mills) built. 

    1753 – the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut granted a petition to establish the New Milford North Purchase section as the Ecclesiastical Society of New Preston.

    1758-1794  --  Judah Baldwin ran the South Shepaug Factory Complex.

    1760 – the Titus Homestead built.

    1772 – in Washington Village, the Old Red House built by two brothers Leman and Joel Stone, a Whig and a Tory.

    1775-1783 – American Revolution. General George Washington came through the area several times. He even spend a night in New Preston at Cogswell Tavern. Thirty Revolutionary soldiers were buried in the original Judea Cemetery.

    1778 – there were 270 families living in the area

    1779 – the Town of Washington incorporated. It was taken from Woodbury, Litchfield, Kent, and New Milford. The town was named in honor of General George Washington, who traveled through the area several times during wartime.

    1780s  --  Mallory Brook was named for Caleb Mallory and his family who were murdered at this time. Their hired hand, Davenport, was hanged for the crime.

    1781 – Major Cogswell owned a tavern along the "turnpike" at which General Washington dined. Justice of the Peace, Major William Cogswell, son of Edward, was elected the town's first selectman.

    1790-1831  --  Moody ran the Moody Fulling Mill for 41 years.  He was a leading citizen of Washington. 

    1794  --  in Romford, St. John's Episcopal Church built.

    1801 – on the Green in Washington Village, the Congregational Church built.

    1802-1876  -- on New Preston Hill Rd., was the boyhood home of Horace Bushnell, Congregational clergyman. (His birthplace was at Bantam in Litchfield.)  He was the pivotal American theologian who freed mainstream Protestant theology from its Puritanism, thus helped to clear the way for religious liberalism.

    1815  --  the St. John's Episcopal Church was moved by oxen to a site on Green Hill.

    1816  --  the dam at the South Shepaug Factory Complex rebuilt by brothers Levi S. and Ely Platt.  

    At first Washington was principally a farming community.

    Some of the early industries were ironworks and quarries as well as small mills and factories run by waterpower along the Shepaug and Aspetuck Rivers.

    1822 – at Marbledale, where there were quarries in an earlier day, the brick St. Andrews Episcopal Church built.

    1824 – at the west end of New Preston, the native stone Congregational Church built.

    1827  -- birth of the future Senator Orville Hitchcock Platt in Washington.  

    1832  -- Marvin Dimcock built a cotton-woolen plant, the third mill factory complex along the Shepaug River.

    1835  --  Olmstead took over the South Shepaug Factory Complex.

    1843  --  the Dimcock complex was sold at a loss. 

    1844  --  the old Dimcock mill sold and became the Washington Company (until 1851).  Other owners included Herman Baldwin, Frank Kilbourn and Charles Dipple. 

    1844  -- Joseph W. Titus bought an area along the Shepaug River.

    1846  --  Titus leased from John Northrup Gunn the right to a stretch of Shepaug River.  He erected a weir dam and directed some of the river water to a sawmill built at the southern end of his channel. 

    1849  -- Orville Hitchcock Platt admitted to the Bar. (He had attended the Yale University Law School.)

    1850 – the Gunnery School, a preparatory school for boys, established by a remarkable teacher, Frederick W. Gunn (1816-1881.)

    1854 map  -- there were mills on the Shepaug River and the Kirby and Mallory Brooks.

    Underground Railroad  --  the Underground Railway stopped on Blackville Road at Mrs. Ney's barn.

    1861-1865 – the Civil War.

    1866  --  Olmstead bought the old Moody Fulling Mill for $6.07 for non-payment of town taxes.

    by 1871  --  Henry Woodruff gained control of the land and mill of Joseph W. Titus.

    1871 --  Factory Hollow became Washington Depot.

    1871 photo  --  shows the Match Factory and Henry Woodruff's mill and factory in Factory Hollow.

    1872 – the Shepaug Railroad reached Washington.

    1873-1877  --  Henry Woodruff's three-story factory building housed the Match Factory.

    1877-1881  --  Henry Woodruff's three-story factory building housed part of  his carriage making venture.

    1879-1905  --   Orville Hitchcock Platt became a U.S. Senator. 

    1879   --  birth of the future Major General Benjamin D. Foulois (1879-1967).  He would serve in the Spanish-American War. 

    shortly before 1880  --  shortly before Olmstead's death, the South Shepaug Factory Complex was foreclosed.

    1881  -- death of Frederick W. Gunn.

    1881-1908  --  Henry Woodruff's factory building housed Kingman Mills.

    1881  --  Carl Bader (1853-1924) entered the U.S. from Alsace-Lorraine. 

    1882  -- Carl Bader arrived in Washington Depot. He would eventually establish a meat market and run it for 40 year.  The store was known variously as Carl Bader, Bader & Sons and Bader's Market.

    c. 1887 photo  --  the marshalling yard and the Washington Market building. 

    1888  -- notorious Blizzard of 1888.

    late 1880s  --  the mills of the South Shepaug Factory Complex run by various owners until ice jams and flooding destroyed the dam. 

    1893-1918  --  the home farm  for Holiday House was in existence.  Holiday House was a summer vacation home for the Working Girls' Club.  The club was associated with Saint Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, New York City.

    Edward Hook Van Ingen, a man grown wealthy from the woolen imports business, had architect Ehrick K. Rossiter design a house in memory of their oldest daughter Jeannine, who died of scarlet fever at the age of 16.  The house was on a promontory overlooking the Shepaug River valley.

    c. 1900 photo --  the mill in Factory Hollow.

    c. 1900 photo  --  Ezra Hull's blacksmith shop.

    1902 – about 3/4 mile northeast of Washington Village, Wykeham Rise, a preparatory school for girls, established.

    1908 – the Gunn Memorial Library, named for abolitionist and Gunnery School founder Frederick William and his wife, Abigail Brinsmade Gunn, dedicated.

    1909  --  Lt. Foulois accompanied the Wright brothers on their flight tests for the U.S. Army.  He would become the first living person to be enshrined in the Air Force Museum. 

    1910 photo --  looking down river from the Green Hill bridge.

    1912  --  St. John's Episcopal Church (of wood) burned; Ehrick Rossiter designed the present church (of stone).

    1919  --  architect Ehrick Rossiter and family moved to Edgewood.  He brought his New York caretaker, Ed Coll, up to Washington to look after his first and second house.  Ed Coll's sister Anne married an artist named deValera and had a child named Emon.  When deValera died, Ed Coll send his sister and nephew back to Ireland to grow up with close relatives.  Emon deValera grew up to be a prime mover of Irish independence and later prime minister of Ireland.

    1925 – Ehrick Rossiter gave the town its first preserve, the Steep Rock Reservation.

    1928  --  Borden's Cremery closed. 

    1929 – Pavilion Hall erected in New Preston as a cultural club.

    1930s  --  in Washington Depot, Borden's Creamery torn down to build Bryan Memorial Town Hall.  It was named for hometown boy Gregory Seeley Bryan, owner of the Weed Chain Company in Bridgeport and donator of the money for the new town hall.  The old town hall was taken down and the area became the town park. The World War I memorial placed here.

    1930s  --  Bob's Diner sold out to bouncer Jack Williams who built Jack's Grill. 

    1930  --  passenger trains stopped running to the aea. 

    1930  --  the Romford School for children established in Washington Depot. It is now Rumsey Hall. 

    1932  --  the new town hall finished. 

    1936  -- the Bader Brothers sold the old Titus/Woodruff mill to Thomas Rosford who ran it until 1952. 

    1941-1945  --   World War II.

    1941  --  Americans set up the Emergency Rescue Committee to help artists escape from the Nazis to the USA.  The committee arranged for French artist André  Masson (whose wife Rose was Jewish) to travel to the Caribbean island of Martinique, and from there to enter the United States. The Masson family settled in New Preston, Connecticut. After the war he returned to France.

    after World War II  --  in Washington Depot, Jack's Grill, the working man's bar, became the Shepaug Club.  

    1947  --  the old Dimcock mill ended as Dipple's cider mill.

    1947  -- Irish hero Emon deValera came to Washington to see his American relatives.

    1948 – the Shepaug Railroad‘s freight line closed.

    1952  --  the old Titus/Woodruff/Bader/Rosford mill turned into an egg candling factory.

    1955 – a flood destroyed many homes and businesses in Washington Depot.

    closed 1964  --  Robert Woodruff, a descendent of Henry Woodruff, was the last man to run a mill on the Aspetuck River.  He ran a machine shop out of the old Beeman mill in New Preston.  (He was also the last man to run a mill on the Shepaug River.)   After leaving the mill, Robert was struck with MS and was never able to stand again.

    1967  --  death of Major General Fulois.   

    1990s  --  the Shepaug Club closed down as a bar and restaurant. 

    1999  --  the designer Bill Blass sold his company for $50 million and retired to his home in New Preston.

    Today – the population exceeds 4,000.


    Sources:

    William C. Bader (with Pamela M. Redmer).  1998.  An American Village: The Light at the North End of the Tunnel. Washington Depot, CT: Design to Printing. 

    The Town of Washington, Connecticut: About Washington.  http://www.washingtonct.org/about.html

    Washington, Connecticut from the Connecticut Guide, 1935.  http://members.skyweb.net/~channy/CTGuideWash.html

     

    Back to the w. Connecticut Page
    Back to the Main Page

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF WASHINGTON

    Nettleton Hollow, Romford and Smoky Hollow belong to Litchfield. ... 1846 -- Titus leased from John Northrup Gunn the right to a stretch of Shepaug River. .... The Town of Washington, Connecticut: About Washington. ...
    www.nynjctbotany.org/lgtofc/washingtonconnhist.html - Cached - Similar

     



    Two Revolutionary War veterans, Asa Northrop and Samuel Hawley, are buried here. As in other Brookfield cemeteries Brookfield

    Connecticut Reports

                                                    By Connecticut. Supreme Court of Errors

    Some interesting cases involving Northrops -- mention of a John Northrop and Gad Northrop

    1865 Alvin day book Mention of "Went to Woodville". This would be after Amos death. AJN shows Gerry's death as March 14, 1875, New Haven, Conn.

    Redding Ridge's tavern owner, Stephen Betts, certainly fits the profile:

    Lieutenant Stephen Betts, was a prominent character in the Revolution. He was an active patriot, and was taken prisoner by the British on their march to Danbury in April, 1777. A County Convention was held at his house/tavern on August 10, 1779.

    Betts was prominent in town politics, serving as Town Selectman during the Revolution, as well as several town committees formed in support of the war.

    General Samuel H. Parsons was headquartered at Betts' home/tavern from 1778 to 1781.

    1840 census warren map has an a.t. peck in the western district by the
    Kent border just above Trout Brook. No Northrop, Osborn185? by 1850
    Northrops were in Washington

    1868

    Col Canfield District 9 Washington map maybe route 147?

    also LA Canfield by cemetery east of Kirbys Brook in the Centre

    DN Canfield right in the center 1 door away from Cong Parsonage

    Mrs. J. Bishop Calhoun Street District 2 next to Washington Station

    Kent vital records
    NORTHROP
    Agur Curtis, s. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. May 8, 1812
    Agur Curtiss, m. Lucy Marsh SWIFT, b. of Kent, Jan. 22, 1839,
    by Rev. Henry B. Sherman, of New Preston
    Alvin, m. Sally ATWOOD, July 2, 1826, by Rev. L.P. Hickox
    Amos, m. Susan CHOCUM, Oct. 26, 1829, by John Mills, J.P.
    Ann Aurilla, m. Joel B. PRATT, Oct. 3, 1827, by Rev. L.P. Hickox
    Aurelia, d. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. Oct. 11, 1806
    David, Jr., of Sherman, m. Adaline FULLER, of Kent, Oct. 9, 1820, by Rev. Asa Blair
    Maryann, m. John HINCKLEY, June 24, 1832, by Lewis Mills, J.P.
    Thomas Wells, s. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. May 25, 1808

    Alvord, David died July 7, 1831 age 35

    Northrop, Agur C 1812-1857
    Northrop, Aurelia wife of Thomas G died Mar. 4, 1839 age 54y9m11d
    Northrop, Charles C son of A.C. & Lucy M died Nov. 28, 1852 age 2y5m4d
    Northrop, Lewis S 1843-1903
    Northrop, Lucy M Swift wife of A. C 1815-1900
    Northrop, Sarah Abby Barnum wife of L. S. 1839-1918
    Northrop, Thomas G died Sept. 8, 1850 age 79y8m3d
    Northrop, Thomas Mills born May 25, 1808 died July 24, 1885 age 77y2m

    Good Hill Cemetery Kent, Ct.

    Stones copied by Francelia Johnson
    Burials listed from Kent Burial Records

    ...........This is the original cemetery located in Kent, Ct. It is on Route 7
    north of the present town of Kent and north of the original settlement which
    was located in Flanders. One of the first churches is said to have been located
    on this site. Many of the stones are worn from the ages of time and hard to read.

     

    Early marriages Washington

    Samuel Northrop widow Sarah Dutton of Bethlehem June 2, 1779
    John Stoddard of Woodbury Phebe Northrop Sept. 11, 1786

    Record of Mortality
    IN
    Westbury and Watertown
    From March, 1741, TO May, 1859

    Child of Mr. Northrop --- Age 1 --------- 21 may 1853
    Daughter of Abigail Northrop --- Age 3 --------- 06 Feb 1791
    Jonathan Northop --- Age 70 --------- 11 Mar 1803
    Alfred M. Northrup --- Age 50 --------- 20 Oct 1849
    Child of Alfred Northrop --- Age 1 --------- 29 Jun 1845
    John Allen, son of John Northrop --- Age 2 --------- 07 Sep 1839
    John Northrup ( Middlebury) --- Age 59 --------- 11 Mar 1834
    Mrs. Sarah Northrop ( buried in Midbury) --- Age 80 --------- 02 Jan 1853
    Polly, wife of Alfred Northrop --- Age 41 --------- 10 Aug 1845

    Naugatuck

    hose Buried in Gunntown Cemetery,
    Naugatuck, Conn.

     

    By Miss Myrtle M. Jillson of Waterbury, Conn.

    Nichols, Myra, wife of Edward J., d. May 19, 1931
    (d. Robert & Margaret (Tukin) Northrup, b. Sharon, 1846)

    Prisoners under sentence for life:
    Names, age when admitted, nativity, where convicted, when convicted, crime. 
    Those marked with an asterisk were sentenced to be hanged,
    and their sentences were commuted by the Legislature
    to imprisonment for life. 

       Benjamin Scott, ae 27, b. New York; Litchfield; Sept. 2, 1841; attempt at
    murder
       Harry Andrews, ae 17, b. Weston, Ct.; Fairfield; Oct. 30, 1845; rape
       Lucina Coleman, ae 50, b. Hartford, Ct.; Sept. 25, 1849; murder, 2nd degree
       John Brown, ae 35, b. Ireland; Tolland; Nov. 3, 1849; murder, 2nd degree
       William O. Chapin, ae 32, b. Massachusetts; Hartford; Feb. 8, 1849; rape
       Benjamin S. Balcomb*, ae 21, b. Colebrook, Ct.; Litchfield; July 8, 1851;
            murder
       Henry Mennasseth*, ae 48, b. Farmington, Ct.; Litchfield; July 8, 1851;
            murder
       William H. Calhoun*, ae 20, b. Nassau, NY; Litchfield; July 8, 1851; murder
       Catharine Dunn, ae 34, b. Ireland; New London; Sept. 29, 1851; murder, 2nd
            degree
       Nicholas Parrava, ae 24, b. Island of St. Jago; New London; Oct. 5, 1853;
            murder, 2nd degree
       Michael Mooney, ae 28, b. Ireland; New Haven; Nov. 8, 1853; murder, 2nd
            degree

       Morris Nichols, ae 29, b. Greenfield, Ct.; Fairfield; Mar. 10, 1854;  murder,
            2nd degree
       Isaac Randolph*, ae 45, b. Pennsylvania; N. Haven; July 16, 1856; murder, 2nd
            degree

       Albert Northrop, ae 22, b. Washington, Ct.; New Haven; Sept. 13, 1856;
            bestiality

       John A. Benson, ae 35, b. Rocky Hill, Ct.; Middlesex; Sept. 25, 1858; perjury
            with intent to take life
       Benjamin Roberts, ae 40, b. New Milford, Ct.; Hartford; Dec. 29, 1858;
            murder, 2nd degree
       John P. Warren, ae 21, b. Coventry, Ct.; Tolland; Dec. 14, 1859; murder, 2nd
            degree

    from

    Statewide County CT Archives History .....Report
    Of The Directors Of The Connecticut State Prison, 1860 May 1860

    http://files.usgwarchives.org/ct/statewide/history/reportof87gms.txt

    Gold

    Daniel, Samuel, and Stephen Gold (now written Gould), brothers, members of a Fairfield family that had been prominent in church and state for several generations, were among the early settlers of the town, though none of their descendants are now found among us. Daniel appears first: he married Grace, daughter of Deacon Stephen Burr, and lived where James Lord now lives. His children, as named in the will of Deacon Burr, were: Abigail, who married Richard Nichols. Esther, who married Nathaniel Northrop. Sarah, who married David Turney. Mary, who married Seth Price; and Elizabeth.

    Samuel Gold settled in Lonetown, and built the house now owned by Seth Todd. He was a soldier in the Revolution, and was wounded at the skirmish in Ridgefield. Some of the officers of Putnam's commnd had their quarters at Mr. Gold's during their encampment in Redding. Their children were: Hezekiah, Daniel, Burr, Aaron, Sarah, Polly, and Grace. Stephen Gold settled on the farm later owned by Timothy Platt in Lonetown. He is called captain in the records. He did not long remian a resident of Redding, but returned, it is said to Greenfield.

    The Early Families of Redding Connecticut (CT)

    http://www.historyofredding.com/HRFamilies.htm

    • ID: I124634
    • Name: Harriet Northrop
    • Surname: Northrop
    • Given Name: Harriet
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1810
    • _UID: 4A9334CBAA27D6429890742A5A7FB7C9E40D
    • Census: 1850 Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
    • Change Date: 15 Dec 2007 at 00:00:00



      Marriage 1 Seymour Morehouse [hill 36] b: 24 Jan 1798 in
      Washington
      , Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
      • Married: 7 Sep 1828
      Children
      1. Has No Children Henry S Morehouse b: 1836 in
        Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
      2. Has No Children Artemita Morehouse b: 1839 in
        Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Noble Morehouse
      4. Has No Children Harriet Morehouse b: 1842 in
        Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
    LINK

    33. HOMER18 BUCKINGHAM (GILBERT17, ABEL16, SARAH15SMITH,
    J
    OSEPH14, SARAH13FOWLER, WILLIAM12, WILLIAM11, JOHN10,
    W
    ILLIAM9, THOMAS8, ROGER7, WILLIAM6, WILLIAM5, HENRY4, JOHN3,
    J
    OHN2, JOHN1LE FOWLER) was born 29 November 1828 in
    Northville, Litchfield, Connecticut, and died 17 October 1907 in New Milford,
    Litchfield, Connecticut. He married ADELINE COUCH 11 November 1850
    in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut.

    Notes
    Buried in Northville Cemetery, New Milford, Litchfield County, Connecticut


           Children of Homer Buckingham and Adeline Couch are:



    i. NUANIA19 BUCKINGHAM, b. Abt 186141.
    ii. LOTTIE BUCKINGHAM, b. Abt 186442.

    34. JOSIAH NORTHROP18 BUCKINGHAM (DANIEL17, DANIEL16,
    D
    ANIEL15, DANIEL14, HANNAH13FOWLER, WILLIAM12, WILLIAM11,
    J
    OHN10, WILLIAM9, THOMAS8, ROGER7, WILLIAM6, WILLIAM5, HENRY4,
    J
    OHN3, JOHN2, JOHN1LE FOWLER) was born 26 July 1805. He married
    MINERVA FORD 1825.

    http://www.genealogy.com/users/b/u/c/David-A-Buckingham/GENE4-0018.html

    la 1707 two persons came into New Milford.

    In 1712 there were here 12 families or between 60 and
    70 persons. A census, taken in 1756, reports 1137 in the
    town ; another taken in 1774, reported 2776, while in
    1800, after pans of the town had been ceded to Brookfleld
    and Washington, the population was 3198. The census of
    of 1870, gives the population of the present New Milford,
    as 3588, while Bridgev/ater, formerly a part of this town,
    has 877 inhabitants.

    greens annual register

     

    Much of this line is pretty well documented. However, Amos has been the brick wall preventing a connection to the earliest Northrop/ups. ,

    In the published Northrup/ Northrop genealogy, neither Amos Northrop/up's nor Rachel Ives' parents are documented. I believe I've tracked down Rachel, but Amos is still a mystery. Regardless of the location or spelling almost all of these Northrops are descended from Joseph Northrup of Milford, CT. Here are a few facts, speculations and clues to help pin them down..What we know about Amos Northrop/Northrup
    Amos was probably born in Eastern New York or the Western half of Connecticut -- an area with many Northrops. He spent a most of his life in Kent and adjoining Warren & Washington, CT. There is no mention of his early life or profession.

    ???

    http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hume/tree/19201.htm

    Baldwin, Enos 81

    • Marriage: Northrup, Elizabeth 81

    bullet   Another name for Enos was Amos.81

    Enos married Elizabeth Northrup, daughter of Phineas Northrup and Elizabeth Brinsmade.81 (Elizabeth Northrup was born on 17 Jan 1732/33 in Milford, New Haven Co, CT 81.)

     

     

    The death record of Washington CT has his birth as Kent and occupation Laborer. There is a conflict in his age at death 69 in Washington, but by the time he was buried in Warren Cemetery he was ten years older! age 79.

    Thanks to the Town Clerks office at Washington!

    I was able to confirm Amos Death and burial with the Warren Town Clerk's Office (Thanks for your wonderful assistance!).

    "I found a listing in a notebook refering to a sexton's book that lists his burial on May 18, 1855, age 79.  That is all the information listed in the book." This gives Amos a birthdate of around 1776 !! a new date in all the research.

    The sextons book is by F. B. Taylor, Warren and refers to burials from 1847-1869.  I believe he was the Sexton or Clerk for the Warren Congregational Church.

    'The Church of Christ was established in May 1750 as, "The East Greenwich Society of Kent" by division of "The First Society." Since then the church has been known as "The Congregational Society of Warren", "The First Ecclesiastical Society of Warren", The First Congregational Church of Warren", and in 1941, when the Society and the Church incorporated, it became known as "The Warren Congregational Church, Incorporated." In the National Historic Register, the Church is known as "The Warren Congregational Church." Records include baptism and marriage records.'

    The Washington Town clerk also provided this transcription (made in 1915?) of Northrops in Washington.

    (Rev. Daniel Brinsmade was of Judea Parish, Rev. Hart Talcott ordained 1817 of Warren)

    The Northrop name does not appear in any of the original divisions of Kent.The earliest Northrop I find in Thomas Grant Northrop son of Amos who went to Yale.

    [His brother, 27. Amos, b. Oct. 11, 1772. appears to have life his entire life in New Milford. m. Hannah ELDERKIN. Thomas' uncle, David (22. David, b. July 27, 1746. .) was married to Rachel Grant sister to Anne, wife of Amos Northrop 3d but all children were born in NewMilford.]

    No record of Northrops as members of the church in Kent although several neighbors appear. Atwater History of Kent Perhaps they were associated with another Parish -- especially if they were closer to an adjacent parish or had a family connection to another parish.

    Perhaps the Northrops stayed in the same area from the earliest census. I thought perhaps it was the Woodville section from names on some of the maps (NE of Washington by Mt. Tom), but perhaps they were in the corner where Kent, Warren and Washington meet.

    1859 Hopkins Map Litchfield County

    Kent Warren
      Washington

    Woodville Section of Washington by Mount Tom
    Warren Litchfield
      Washington

    West of Litchfield. Warren, formerly a part of Kent, was settled about 1737. The parish of East Greenwich was organized in 1750. In 1786, a town was incorporated and named for a Massachusetts man, Gen. Joseph Warren, the Revolutionary hero, who lost his life at Bunker Hill. The town consists of a high plateau, bordered on the south by Lake Waramaug.

    Lake Waramaug

    New Preston, Connecticut. From the top of the "hill" that's just southeast of Lake Waramaug called The Pinnacle.

    above from http://www.flickr.com/photos/richardspics/718893025/in/pool-24554386@N00

    THE tract now comprising the towns of Kent and Warren was sold at auction at the court house in Windham, in March, 1738. The settlernent commenced the same year.The principal settlers were from Colchester, Fairfield and Norwalk The first minister was the Rev. Cyrus Marsh, ordained in May, 1741.

    Kent

    the Moravian church or mission house was standing 30 or 40 years since, near the house of Mr. Raymond, by the Episcopal church. The Moravians left this place about half a century since. The Scatacook tribe, for whose benefit this mission was established, occupied the interval on the west side of the river for about three miles.

    It may be that this earlier mission set the stage for the Mission School in nearby Cornwall.

    Warren

    The agricultural productions are grass and some grain. Butter and cheese are made, and beef and pork raised by the inhabitants. The town is watered by the Shepaug, a branch of the Housatonic. Raumaug pond, a considerable body of water, is situated partly in this town, and partly in Washington. The population of the town in 1810 was 1,096; in 1830 it was reduced to 986.

    John Warner Barbor print of Litchfield, Connecticut, 1836. Courtesy of the Litchfield Historical Society.

    search yielded raymonds and olmsteads with many northrop connections


    The Amos Issues

    "1 AMOS NORTHROP, b. Jan. 8, 1778, probably at Chatham, N. Y ?? most of children's census records say NY-- between 1774-1800 but may not have been LIVING in NY. Amos' 1850 Census record says CT . Lived also at Warren and Kent, Conn. D. May 16,1855, Warren, Conn. (have not found any record of his death or marker) M. Rachel Ives (b. March 15,1775).had at least two wives married Susan Chaugham/Chaugum (Lighthouse tribe Molly Barber descendant) Kent, CT Oct. 26, 1829.
    Census support Amos in Kent and Warren. see Census Summary Below

    i Alvin, b. Apr. 15, 1803, Chatham, N. Y BORN NY don’t know where and don't know if family was LIVING there OR
    Kent, CT
    . 3 ii Gerrit, b. Aug. 9, 1812, Most/all of the Census listings say born CT Chatham, N. Y. "

    2 ALVIN NORTHROP (Amos),[need Record of Death from Westport] b. Apr. 15, 1803, ? Chatham, N. Y. ; shoemaker at Kent, Conn. ; m. at Kent, July 2, 1826, Sarah Wakeman Alvord (b. May 25, 1809, Kent; d. June 2, 1886, Southport, Conn.), dau. of Daniel (probably David) and Abigail (Wakeman) Alvord /or / David and Abigail Jennings. David is born in Fairfield. They are married in Fairfield 1800 and move to Kent by 1802. Why did they move to Kent? Their children are born in Kent and David dies in Kent 1831. Sarah and Alvin moved to Westport after the death of Sarah's father and lived for a time next to her mother and sister in Westport. Most of her family was in the Westport area. Alvin d. Nov. 29, 1875, Westport, Conn. Northrop name is on a Westport map dated 1867.
    i Julia Burr (sarah's grandmother was Eunice Burr), b. Nov. 28, 1832, Kent, Conn. ; m. Feb. 1, 1854, Charles Bulkley ; d. ??. perhaps Charles Seymour Bulkley ("a successful engineer") mentioned on page 816 of Jacobus (1933) and a descendant of the Rev. Peter Bulkeley in the Gershom, Peter line
    ii Francis, b. June 4, 1835, Kent ; d. July 9, 1837. (Age 2)
    4 iii William Fenn, (where did name Fenn come from?) b. Nov. 6, 1836, Kent
    IV Frances Josephine b. Aug 20, 1838, Kent m. at Rye, N. Y., Dec. 13, 1854, Charles Meeker; > Charles A b 1832? d. March 18, 1876, Westport, Conn.
    6 v George Elmore, (where did name Elmore come from?) b. Feb. 17, 1844, Cornwall, Conn.
    vi Louisa Azonetta, b. Apr. 12, 1850, Westport; m. March 2, 1871, at Westport. Geroge B. MILLS b: Abt 1845 in Westport,CT
    3 GERRIT NORTHROP (Amos), b. Aug. 9, 1812, Chatham? , N. Y. Census listings say CT; m. Feb. 11, 1834, Betsey (Elizabeth) Millard probably daughter of Joel Millard (son of Joshua ancestors from Mass) b. Cornwall, CT and Tabitha GREEN Milford or New Milford (Sarah Wakeman Alvord Northrop's brother Nelson marries Caroline (1829 Kent) Chamberlain then Adelia Millard in Torrington 1858 Nathan Skiff in Cornwall was probably Adelia's first marriage (d. May 8, 1868).
    He d. March 14, 1875, New Haven, Conn.
    6 i James Edward, b. Jan. 26, 1839, Warren, Conn.
    ii Charles Alvin, b. July 6, 1886. Five years in Civil War ; Second Lieutenant. Sailed, about 1880, as steward, on a voyage to Africa ; not heard from since. Supposed to have been lost at sea. Neglected to give name of vessel he sailed on.
    iii Eliza Ann, b. Dec. 7, 1847 ; m. William Hall, and living at Milton, Litchfield Co., Conn. ; 2 children.
    4 WILLIAM FENN NORTHROP (Alvin, Amos), (name may be from Hannah Ives Fenn prob sister of Rachel) b. Nov. 6, 1836, Kent, Conn. Carpenter and builder, and dealer in lumber, coal, etc., firm of "Northrop Brothers," at Southport, Conn. M. Dec. 23, 1857, at Mamerneck, N. Y., Abbie Jane, dau. of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Jane Baker, who are now dead, but formerly lived at Greens Farms, Conn.
    i Ella Angelina, b. Nov. 4, 1858 ; d. Sept. 8, 1864.
    ii Frederick Elmer, b. Sept. 2, 1871, Southport.
    6 GEORGE ELMORE NORTHROP (Alvin, Amos), b.' Feb. 17, 1844, Cornwall, Conn. Served through the Civil War, in Company A, 8th Connecticut Volunteers. M. at ________________, N. Y., Margaret Harrigan.
    i George Ives, b. July 15, 1871.
    ii Winthrop Blaine, b. Dec. 1, 1884. .

    JAMES EDWARD NORTHROP (Gerrit, Amos)
    b. January 26, 1839 Warren, CT Merchant residing at New Haven, Conn. m. Nov 24, 1864 Sarah Secelia Burnes, dau of James and Elizabeth ( Norton) Burnes of New Haven
    i Lillie E b. Aug 6, 1865 m. June 3, 1885 Oscar D. Beach of Milton CT
    ii Mary Elizabeth b. Sept 17, 18 70, d. Nov 5, 1870.

    The only hard facts - the A Judd Northrup genealogy:

    • The genealogy has some known errors and omissions especially with some of the families on the CT/NY border. Some family lines have been merged and some dates inaccurate. Connection of Amos Alvin and Gerrit is supported, Rachel as wife highly probable. Questions or possible errors: location of Alvin's 's birth. supported as NY but not (yet?) supported as Chatham; year of Amos birth may be 1780 (census) rather than 1778; location of Gerrit's birth CT not NY (census), Rachel's birth year may be 1780 rather than 1775.

    ...and the census listings for Amos and descendants (details below):

    • The census listings have errors in spelling and may reflect omissions or other errors as well.
    • It is quite possible that Amos and/or his parents moved from Milford, Ridgefield / South Salem, Fairfield / Wilton / Redding to Kent. We know his son, Alvin, moved closer to the coast when he and Sarah Wakeman Alvord Northrop changed their residence to Westport.We don't know if this was a return to known Northrop family connections. It appears to be a return to family connections for Sarah Wakeman Alvord.

    The Amos Questions:

    • Who were Amos' parents?
    • Where was Amos born?
    • Was Amos in Kent area before he married Rachel?
    • Where was Amos from birth to 1800?
    • Where was Amos and family in 1810 census?
    • Who is the extra female in the 1820 census?
    • Did Amos have a second or third marriage? Susan Chaugum? Sarah Osborn?
    • Was Amos' family,like the David Alvord Family from the Fairfield Redding area?

    While there are, so far, no traceable connections, there are interesting correlations with:

    Betts and Jelliff families -- possibly through Lewis Northrop/up.

    • William was in the carpentry business with Francis Jelliff (Southport, CT) and Betts and Northrop ran a carpentry business in Georgetown (Redding / Weston line). Betts and Jelliff families are related. see Jelliff page. There are marriages between Northrops and Betts (Ridgefield Norwalk area).
    • The same collection of names appears together in Ridgefield, Kent area and Lanesboro, MA

    Some kind of Elmore connection --

    Some kind of source for William, George and Francis Names in family or friends

    Some kind of source for Fenn middle name for William

    Some means to meet Ives family and Rachel of Wallingford/Cheshire

    • Lived Close to Wallingford? New Haven, Durham, Woodbridge, Woodbury
    • The Ives had connections in New Haven, Wallingford, Cheshire, and later Cornwall and Barkhamsted CT area; no connections in the upper Hudson area of NY near Chatham and no very early connections to Fairfield.
    • Religious or other connection?

    Northrop, Ives and Alvord connections may all be in one location

    • Plymouth is a location where Ives some Northrops and Alvords were in the same location. Many in Thomaston, Watertown, Waterbury, Litchfield as well.
    • Their co-location may be due to growing manufacturing concerns. Torrington, Hitchcocksville and Plymouth.erea cradles of innovation and industry from about 1790 to 1850. Industries include Chair making , Carriage making and clock making..

    Family Naming conventions don't seem consistent

    • Male First name sometimes from GGF First Name
    • Male Middle from Father's Father's Mother's maiden name
    • later generations Eldest male gets mother's maiden as middle, eldest female gets father's mother's maiden name.

    Connecticut map identified as 1766

    Note how large some of the townships/parishes are -- before some were divided.

    Top Picks for Connections to Amos
    Rebecca Northrup(w/o Amos Smith) (RIDGEFIELD)(d/o John (Joseph, William) b. 1703 New Haven died RIDGEFIELD buried Lithgow, NY)
    Some connection to : James NORTHRUP b: 9 Nov 1719 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, Connecticut
    and Rachel SMITH b: 27 Mar 1723 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, Connecticut
     
    BRIEF TIME LINE SUMMARY- CENSUS INFORMATION
    Location Birth 1779-80 On.
    LINK TO COMPREHENSIVE TIMELINE
    Event Amos Locations Age Year
    Census
    Age
    Amos
    Birth
    Year
    Con -firmed
    ?
    Born Chatham area NY, South Salem area NY?, Ridgefield?, Milford?, New Milford?, Woodbury?, Woodbridge?, New Haven? Chatham CT? ~ 0 ~1778 to 1780
    --
    --
    No
    Grew Up ?    
    --
    --
    No
    Childhood Warren?? no northrops ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Kent ?? no northrops ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Cornwall ?? no northrops ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood

    Litchfield Northorp, Joseph --------- 3 over 16, 3 m under 16, 6 females, 0, 0, Page 63 is this salisbury joseph? what about Abner? may have Bradley connection
    May or may not be a son, but probably some connection

    ALVERD ELIHU    CTLITCHFIELD LITCHFIELD 1790
    looks to be in same part of Litchfield in 1790

    ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Woodbury Northrop, Enoch --------- 1, 0, 4, 0, 0, Page 78 NO ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Isaac Woodbridge 12400 one male 16 and up, 2 males under 16 [~1775-1790], 4 females perhaps 2 sons, 3 daughters? ~10-12 1790 -- -- Census
    Childhood Watertown Northrop, Gedion 2d
    1 3 5 0 0
    Northrop, Joel 2 1(not cyrus he is 17) 1 0 0 maybe
    Northrop, Jonathan 2 1 4 0 0
    Northrop, Joseph 1 0 0 0 0 NO
    ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Harwinton ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Bethlehem ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Washington, CT Amos 1 2 2 0 0 and Elijah 1 2 2 0 0 ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Married Before 1800 female in census Wallingford ? Cheshire? Mother Sarah Butler Ives 1790 1800 ~20 ~1800
    --
    --
    No
    Spouse Rachel Ives very likely ~ 20 ~ 1800
    --
    --
    No
    Residence Kent, CT ~ 20 - 22 1800
    16 - 26
    1774-1785
    Census
    Residence Kent Thomas Grant 001 m 16-25 1 m 26-45 0 00000 between Comstock & Pratt Thomas ~ 29 in 1800. Who is male age 16-25?? no kids by aurelia til 1805. Amos Wilkes about 27?   1800     Census
    Residence ?? New Milford 20010/20010 or Maybe Mass or Vermont? or living with someone else ~ 30 1810
    26 - 35
    1775-1784
    Census
    Residence ??ENOS NORTHRUP   Litchfield, Cornwall       1810      
    Residence Kent, CT Kent 1 m under 10/ 1 m 18-26 1 f 26-45
    1 female over 45 *
    WHO IS THE FEMALE?
    or Rachel could be just 45 and the female 26-45??
    ~ 40-42 1820
    26 - 45
    1775- 1794
    Census
    Residence Kent, CT Kent 1 m. 40-50, 1 f 10-20 stepdau?, 1 f 50-60 Susan prob not might older than Amos maybe younger ~ 50 - 52 1830
    40 - 50
    1780-1790
    Census
    Residence Warren, CT Warren with Gerry? no sign of GN wife or child ~ 60 - 62 1840
    60 - 70
    1770-1780
    Census
      Drake, son of Enos in Cornwall 1 m 70-80 1 female 70-80 -- 1840
    --
    --
    --
    Residence Washington, CT with Gerry no sign
    of his wife or child
    ~ 70 -72 1850
    72
    1778
    Census
    Residence Amos Kent pauper (wrong age) ~ 70 -72 1850
    78
    1772
    --
      Lyman and Wells Northrop (son of Cyrus g-son of Joel and Eunice
    Marsh) Kent
    -- 1850 -- -- --
    Death Warren, CT May 16,1855 AJ Northrup book ~ 77 1855
    --
    --
    No
    Residence After Washington, CT Only Gerry and
    family no Amos
    ~ 80 1860
    --
    --
    Census
    Buried ? Warren?/Washington? -- 1855
    --
    --
    No

    The "family sticks together" speculation

    In the absence of more definitive information, I've reviewed possible neighbors in the census (where available). In census lists that are not alphabetical, I speculate name sequence reflects physical order of homes. Below are the names I watched for in the review.

    The table lists the results as likely extended family connections. I speculate the earlier data is more likely to be significant. The years are links to images of the census pages.

    Census neighbor names
    Tibblas Nettleton A Clark Smith Smith Clark

    Kent David Bradley (prob f Timothy m Mercy/Marcy Baldwin w Lydia Smith)

    Amos Smith mother is Rebecca Northrup sister of Enos et al

    Speculation 1800 Milford ??  
    Beecher Bishop Bishop Bishop A ? Stone Speculation 1810 New Milford ??  
    Chitenden/Canfield Perry A Pratt Booth Speculation 1820 Kent  
    Norton Waldron Cummins A Hubbel Berry Johnson Speculation 1830 Kent  
    Munson Marsh Noth GN AN A Osborne Peck Peck Peck Speculation 1840 Warren  
    B? Bishop Whitney GN A Canfield Wheeler Bishop Speculation 1850 Washington  

     

    (New Cambridge now Plymouth and Bristol)

    FAMILY NAMES
    NAME   DEFINITE
    CONNECTION
    POSSIBLE
    CONNECTION

    Alvin

    Definite

    Alvin spouse of Sarah Wakeman Alvord and Alvin Jennings Northrop

    perhaps from Alvin Bradley ? spouse of another Lucy Ives possible Rachel cousin OR
    ??? Oliver Alvin NORTON Goshen from Norton Birdsey line OR
    ????Alvin Bingham Salisbury Allen, Bradley, Claytor, Cope, Mountjoy, Moxley, Newton, or as last name

    Alvord

    definite

    Alvin's wife Sarah

     

    Baker

    definite

    William Fenn Northrop's wife

     

    Barber

    possible

     

    Molly Barber Chaugum connection

    Bartholomew

    Rachel

    Connection to Rachel Ives Lucy Ives Wallingford married Bartholomew children born Cazenovia, Madison, NY [prob cousin Lucy Ives b. 1815 in CT married Garrett Andrews ]

     

    Beach

    definite

    Gerrit Northrop's son in law

     
    Beecher Rachel Connection to Rachel Ives brother Ransom Ives Wallingford married Eunice F. Beecher  
    Blakeslee or Blakesley Rachel Connection to Rachel Ives sister Ruth Ives (Wallingford) Jonathan Webb Blakeslee Wallingford  
    Booth Rachel check other Calebs Connection to Rachel Ives Caleb Ives Wallingford, Durham & VT married
    Sarah Booth
     
    Bradley Rachel Connection to Rachel Ives possible cousin Lucy Ives m. Alvin Bradley (parish of Mt.Carmel),
    Alvin married (1)Lucy Ives on 31 Dec 1797 in Hamden,   Alvin married (2)Abigail Hall on 3 Feb 1802 in Hamden, .[prob cousin Lucy Ives b. 1815 in CT married Garrett Andrews moves and dies Linn County, Iowa]
    Also David Bradley (not Alvin's brother -- Amos and Rachel's neighbor in 1800 Kent

    Bulkley

    definite

    Alvin's son in law

     

    Burr burr history

    definite

    Alvin's daughter plus other burr connections

     

    Butler

    Rachel

    Rachel Ives Mother was Sarah Butler (Ives)

     
    Castle /Caswell Definite Aner Ives (neighbor and cousin/uncle to Rachel), Abigail Northrop d/o Benjamin (Jeremiah Newtown) m. Sybil Castle her sister Eunice married Ebenezrer Castle  

    Chamberlain

    Definite

    Sarah Alvord sister-in-law

     

    Chaugum

    Probable Barbour listing of marriages only known Amos in the area at the time

     

    Amos 2nd or 3rd wife Susan daughter of Samuel. Susan's mother Miss Green, brother Solomon m.Sophia Bills, brother Benjamin no listing

    Elmore

    definite

    Alvin's son William's son

    and ???

    Fenn

    Rachel / definite

    Alvin's son ALSO through Rachel Ives Hannah Ives married in New Haven perhaps married to Austin Fenn's of Theophilus (buried in Litchfield) or Edward. Hannah died Weston, VT? Austin Fenn, b. 23 Dec 1763 his mother's surname is Austin , d. 30 Jul 1845, . Hannah Ives (d. 20 May 1829); ) or Edward. Hannah died Weston, VT? in VT by 1801 and perhaps as early as 1794. Austin Fenn, b. 23 Dec 1763 his mother's surname is Austin married before 1793 prob in Vermont by 1805, d. 30 Jul 1845, . Hannah Ives (d. 20 May 1829);
    --------------------------
    Also neighbor in 1800 Kent. Also lived close to Ives in 1790 Wallingford

    .
    Frances Definite Alvin Daughter, Frances Josephine ??? OR Connection to Rachel Ives Charles Ives m. Mary Frances Wallingford their son (Rachel's nephew) is Elihu

    Francis

    Definite

     Alvin son who died young b.1835

    and ???

    George

    Definite

     Alvin Son

    and ???

    Gerrit

    Spelling?

    Alvin's brother Gerry in Census

    AND ???
    Griswold Rachel probable check other Levis Connection to Rachel Ives brother Levi m. Huldah Killingworth thru 1826  

    Hall

    Definite /Rachel

    Gerrit Northrop's son in law

    Connection to Rachel Ives Elihu Ives b: 8 Feb 1764 in Wallingford married Phebe Ann Hall 1792 in VT by 1797 children born Ludlow, VT OR [may be a cousin, Elihu Ives ] Married Polly or Mary Northrup in Cheshire (Dau of Joel & Mabel Sarah Bird) and second marriage to Lucy Whittimore

    Hemson

    definite

    Sarah Alvord brother-in-law also 1880 neighbor

     

    Ives

    Rachel / Definite

    George Ives middle name, grandson of Alvin

    Amos' wife, also Rachel sister Olive Ives m. Joel Ives Wallingford
    Elihu Ives is Rachel's nephew ( son of brother Charles)
    Charles)

    Jelliff or
    Jelif

    definite

    William's first carpentry partner and Southport neighbor

    Also John Benedict Jelliff (1850 New Canaan )m Emma Frances Northrup (Ridgefield)

    Jennings

    definite

    Alvin J. Middle name and Sarah's mother and sister-in-law

    Also possible through Samuel Mead Northrup (1817) s/oPhillip ???

    Jones

    Definite

    Sarah Alvord sister-in-law

     

    Josephine

    Definite

    Alvin's daughter Frances Josephine

    ??? from Joseph?

    Keeler

    definite

    Mary Keeler Middle name

     
    Kirtland   Connection to Rachel Ives
    Sarah Ives m. Isaac Kirtland Wallingford
     

    Louisa Azonetta

    Definite

     Alvin’s daughter spelling? ??? May be Antoinette

     

    Meeker

    definite

    Alvin's son in law (

     

    Millard

    Definite

    Amos' sister-in-law (Gerrit's wife Elizabeth Betsy Millard )
    also Sarah's sister-in-law Nelson Alvord's 2nd wife Adelia Millard

     

    Mills

    definite

    Alvin's son in law

     
    Munson   Aner Ives conection also Patty Munson married Caleb Northrup, s/o Abel both Milford  
    Porter Definite Ruth Porter(d/o Timothy b.1702) w/o Gamaliel Fenn 1800 Kent neighbors ? John, Joseph, William Gould and Mabel married Porters

    Thorp

    Definite

    Sarah Alvord sister-in-law

     

    Wakeman

    definite

    Alvin's wife

     

    William

    Definite

     Alvin’s eldest son

    and ???

    With the inaccuracies of early maps, it's difficult to tell the exact borders of the older, larger, Litchfield. It may have encompassed as much as with area of green above -- parts of Plymouth, Washington, Kent and Warren. Some of what appears to be a move by Gerrit, may have actually been a change in the town borders.
    Census Neighbor names with plausible family connections
    William Elwell 1800 probable connection to Phoebe Northrop (William Elwell) (d/o Isaac) b. LITCHFIELD CO.
    Amos Smith 1800 right next door almost definite connection to Rebecca Northrup (RIDGEFIELD)(d/o John (Joseph, William) b. 1703 New Haven died RIDGEFIELD buried Lithgow, NY) - mother of Amos Smith Perhaps a connection to Jabez Smith Northrup??
    Jabez Smith is one door away from James Northrup in 1790 Ridgefield Second Society.
    Amos Smith 1800 right next door possible neighbor Amos Smith (RIDGEFIELD OR WILTON) married to Sarah Keeler (RIDGEFIELD OR WILTON)
    Gamamiel Fenn 1800   extended connection of Gamamiel Fenn to Mary Porter (B WATERBURY) m to John Northrup (b MILFORD d. NEWTOWN)
    Aner and Asahel Ives 1800 Rachel Aner and Asahel Ives (b. NEW HAVEN d. GOSHEN connected to Rachel, Munson Castle Caswell
    David Bradley 1800 Rachel? David Bradley ( b. NEW HAVEN OR WOODBRIDGE children in KENT) prob connected to Rachel Ives (mothers side)??
    Northrop and other deaths before 1820 that could account for extra female in census
    What female might be living with Amos and Rachel in 1820 perhaps as a result of a death? So...* who died around this time?

    can't be Sarah Ives- she dies in 1813,
    can't be Jerusha Baldwin wife of Waite dies 1827 Brookfield
    Chloe Baldwin wife of Job (II b 1758) dies 1826
    sisters NONE
    Sisters in law -- wife of Nathaniel -- Esther Gould (death unknown) or Rebecca Baldwin -- no death dates
    Sarah Beach wife of Abel Gillett Northrop who died 1812 her death unknown,
    Patty Munson wife of Caleb Camp Northrop who died 1812 her death unknown but she remarried so prob living in 1820
    , Zilpha wife of Isaac 1777 Northrop who died 1818 her death unknown,
    Lydia Marsh wife of Isaac 1734 Northrop who dies about 1817 her death unstated,
    Lucy Sherman wife of Peter Northrop who died in 1810 her death
    1830

    ID:
    I4735
    Name: Isaac NORTHROP wife NOT hannah olmstead died 1810
    Birth: in South Salem, New York
    Death: Apr 1812
    son Amos perhaps a daughter?

    ID: I178547 SEEMS LIKE SOME KIND OF CONNECTION TO ISAIAH OR JOB
    Name: Isaiah Northrop (s/o Job 1705)Birth: 1746 wife Mary Hubbell3 APR 1746 in Milford/Monroe formerly stfd, Fairfield Co., CT
    1790 census huntington other huntington-- hubbell hawley porter, beardsley, booth, curtis, osborn, beach, platt
    Death: 1817 Fairport Perrinton, Monroe NY Isaiah and Mary daughter, Mabel b.1781 m.Alanson Porter b: 30 MAY 1780 in Williamstown, Berkshire Co., MA
    daughter Huldah m. Stratton Burr b: ABT 1781 in Fairfield, Fairfield Co., CT and had kids in fairfield ct m. Clark 2nd
    son Anson m. Martha Hard b: MAR 1792 in Milton, Litchfield Co., CT stays in Litchfield county
    son Elijah m. Rhoda Betsey Bennett b: 3 JAN 1793 in Monroe, Fairfield Co., CT moved back and forth between NY and Monroe CT

    • ID: I3652
    • Name: Isaiah Northrup Sr. 1 2
    • Sex: M 3
    • Birth: 3 APR 1746 in Monroe, Fairfield Co., CT 4 1 5
    • Death: 17 AUG 1817 in Perinton, Monroe Co., NY 6 2
    • Burial: Schummer's Cemetery, Perinton, Monroe Co., NY 2
    • Note: 7 "....Removed with his wife and children to the town of Perinton (Fairport) Monroe County, N.Y., about 1808 where he resided with his son An drew and died there on 17 Aug 1817 (age 71). He was in the Revolutionary War. ...Isaiah served as a private in Captain Samuel Clark's Co.; Col. Rowell's (Bershire Co.) Regt. Service at New Haven, Ct. Roll sworn to at Lanesborough, Mass. He came to Perinton to live with his sons . He died 17 Aug 1817; his wife, Mary died 4 Mar 1817. They both are buried at Shummers' Cemetery which was part of the Northrup tract . ... The Northrup tract and cemetery are located west of Fairport , N.Y. on the Fairport-East Rochester Road; in the township of Perinton. The cemetery was originally the Northrop family cemetery and was just recently deeded to the township."
    • Note: 7 Isaiah, Sarah and Mary chose William Northrup as their guardian after their father's death.
    • Note: 2 NORTHRUP Isaiah; d Aug. 17, 1817 @ 74y Isaiah Jun.; d Oct. 20, 1819 @ 40y 6m 11d Lewis; d May 2, 1853 @ 72y 4m Mary, consort of Isaiah; d March 4, 1817 @ 71y Rebecca, wife of Isaiah & Louis; d April 15, 1863 @ 80y Sally, dau. of Isaiah Jun. & Rebecca; d Sept. 10, 1823 @ 14y 8d Susannah, wife Jared; d July 27, 1841 @ 24
    • Change Date: 16 JUN 2005

      Father: Job Northrup b: 1705 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      Mother: Mehitabel (Mabel) ?Gillet or Gillett? b~1722
      [ Father: Abel GILLET b: 10 MAR 1697/98 in Wethersfield,Hartford,CT
      Mother: Sarah KIMBERLY c: 23 JUL 1704 in Stratfield,Hartford ,CT m.1722 m2nd Joseph PRINDLE b: Abt 1699 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut
      Married: Abt 1728 2] Marriage 1 Mary Hubbell b: ABT 1746 c: 4 JUN 1749 in Fairfield, Fairfield Co., CT Married: 17 DEC 1767 in Fairfield, Fairfield Co., CT 3 8Children
      1. Has No Children Sarah Northrup b: 8 SEP 1768 in Fairfield Co., CT
      2. Has Children Abiah Northrup b: 16 APR 1770 in Fairfield Co., CT
      3. Has Children Abel Gillett Northrup b: 9 APR 1772 in Fairfield Co., CT
      4. Has Children Hannah Northrup b: 22 NOV 1774 in Fairfield Co., CT
      5. Has No Children Lucy Northrup b: 19 MAR 1777 in Fairfield Co., CT
      6. Has Children Isaiah Northrup Jr. b: 29 MAR 1779 in Fairfield Co., CT
      7. Has Children Mabel Northrup b: 22 MAR 1781 in Fairfield Co., CT
      8. Has Children Polly Ann Northrup b: 3 FEB 1783 in Fairfield Co., CT
      9. Has Children Huldah Northrup b: 6 MAY 1785 in Fairfield Co., CT
      10. Has Children Andrew Northrup b: 10 NOV 1787 in Fairfield Co., CT
      11. Has Children Anson Northrup b: 17 JUL 1790 in Fairfield Co., CT
      12. Has Children Elijah Northrup b: 20 AUG 1793 in Monroe, Fairfield Co., CT
      13. Has Children Marcenus Northrup b: 12 OCT 1796 in Fairfield Co., CT

    ID: I5088
    Name: Job NORTHROP
    Birth: 25 APR 1731 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    Death: 9 NOV 1813 in Sherman,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

    ID: I30693
    Name: John NORTHROP, JR
    Birth: 9 JUL 1732 in Newtown, Fairfield Co.,Connecticut OR
    Birth: 14 JAN 1729 in Ridgefield, Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    Death: 11 MAR 1805 in Newtown, Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    BET. 1752 - 1765 Succeeded his father as Town Clerk, Newtown, Connecticut
    Mother: Mary Porter b: ABT. 1689
    Lois Northrup b: 28 FEB 1731/32 in Newtown, Connecticut
    D: 3 DEC 1800 in Newtown, Age 68 years 2
    John III last child listed 1772 (lois 40)
    any possibility of a later child?

    ID: I03885
    Name: Elihu Northrup 1 2 3 4 5 (s/o Benjamin and Sara Platt)
    Birth: ABT. FEB 1746/47 in Newtown, Fairfield Co., Connecticut 2
    Death: UNKNOWN
    Baptism: 16 FEB 1746/47 Newtown, Fairfield Co., Connecticut 2
    m. Keziah Seeley (b: 1747 in New Milford) 1767 in New Milford
    ch b VT Strafford last 1774
    possibility of a later child?

    ID: I2149
    Name: Thomas Northrop ( s/o Thomas Northrup b: 5 DEC 1727 in Ridgefield, Ridgebury - farmer & laborer
    Mother: Rachel [mother Bouton/Boulton] Morehouse b: 11 FEB 1726/27)
    ??married Clary/Clarissa Cone in 1783??
    Birth: 26 SEP 1751 in Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Connecticut
    Death: 3 JUN 1807 in North Salem, Westchester, New York, Bur.N. Salem Cemetery
    Event: Misc. See Note Page
    Note: Graves not marked at cemetery.
    m. 1770 .Melicent Keeler b: 11 JUN 1753 in Ridgefield
    d. 1836 N. salem
    Has No Children Rachel Northrup b: 5 MAR 1772 in Ridgefield, Fairfield Co., CT m. pulling
    Has Children Lydia Northrup b: 4 APR 1774 in North Salem, Westchester Co., NY m. Riggs
    Has Children Lewis Northrup b: 17 JAN 1791 in Ridgefield, Fairfield Co., CT m. polly smith
    Has No Children Betsey Northrup b: 8 JAN 1793 in North Salem, New London Co., CT m. BloomerBig time break ? other children

    ID: I581
    Name: William Northrop 1 2 3 4 5 (s/o John & Rebecca Roberts)
    Birth: 9 DEC 1734 in Greenfield, Fairfield Co., CT 2 6 7
    Christening: 15 DEC 1734 Greenfield, Fairfield Co., CT 2
    Death: 17 MAY 1800 in Newtown., CT 5
    m. 1764 Newtown Elizabeth Northrup b: 29 SEP 1744 in Newtown (d/o Jonathan 1715 & Ruth Booth)
    m.2 1775 Newtown Mary Shepard b: 19 JUN 1733 in Milford
    Note: 5 Father William Northrop - b. abt 1710, same place. Married unknown abt 1732.
    Note: 8 Division of his estate, Feb. 14, 1798.
    Has No Children Sheldon Northrop b: BEF 3 AUG 1766 c: 3 AUG 1766 in Newtown, Fairfield Co., CT prob died young no wife mentioned
    Has No Children Daniel Northrop b: 27 MAR 1768 in Newtown, Fairfield Co., CT
    Has Children David Northrop b: BEF 2 JUN 1771 in Newtown, Fairfield Co., CT c: 2 JUN 1771 in Newtown, Fairfield Co., CT m. Polly Underhill Newtown
    Has No Children Betty Northrop b: ABT 1773 in Newtown, Fairfield Co., CT m. Lewis Northrup Newtown
    maybe kids after 1773? with Mary Shepard?

    ID: I30700
    Name: John NORTHROP(s/o William and Mary Peck)
    Birth: 17 JUN 1703 in Milford,New Haven Co., Connecticut
    Death: 2 MAY 1794 in Ridgefield, Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    m.Rebeckah (Rebecca) Roberts b: ABT 1708 in Ridgefield
    last child b. 1746
    M. 2 Elizabeth Married: BEF 1789
    a child with Elizabeth?

    ID: I578724438
    Name: Wright NORTHROP (s/0 Jeremiah & Hannah Benedict)
    Birth: 1730 Brookfield 1 2
    Death: Wft Est 1749-1821 1 2
    m. 1755 Anna Benedict b: 22 Feb 1730 in Ridgefield d. 1806 Brookfield (d/o Matthew Benedict & Ruth Keeler)
    Has No Children Andrew Northrop b: 1758 in Brookfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut
    Has No Children Waite Northrop b: 12 May 1765 in Brookfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut
    Has No Children John Northrop b: 14 Jan 1772 in Brookfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut

    maybe kids after 1772?

    A the Torrington, Hitchcocksville, Winchester, Plymouth area is a nexus of family names - references to Ives, Alvords, Northrops, Fenns and some others. . The region, with it's favorable water power, was a cradle of innovation and industry from about 1790 to 1850. It included Chair making, Carriage making and Clock-making -- all of which may have family connections.

    Chairs Alvord/Alford The famous Hitchcock chairs were manufactured in Riverton/ Hitchcockville. Jesse Ives was a Riverton/Hitchcocksville Tavern Owner and postmaster across from the Hitchcock chair factory. His connection is more remote - he and Rachel may share a GG grandfather (Joseph).

    An interesting Ives connection -- Jesse Ives wrote the obituary for one of the Barkhamsed lighthouse tribe. Amos second or third wife was from this tribe. Barkhamsted tribe -- one of Chaugum girls marries John Elwell (b. 1815) may have been Amos neighbor???

    Carriages Alvord Sarah's brother Nelson ends up manufacturing carriages in Torrington -- apparently quite a successful business.

    Clocks Ives Have yet to find connection for clockmaker Ives to Rachel.

    More about Chairs, carriages and clocks.

    NORTHROP IN WASHINGTON, CT

  • ID: I1122
  • Name: Sarah FRISBIE 1 2 3
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: 1756
  • Christening: 1756 Branford, CT
  • Death: 24 FEB 1840 in Cass co., MI
  • Note: In 1827 she signed a document transferring all of her assets to her son, Amos Frisbie Northrop, in exchange for him agreeing to support her the rest of her life. In 1838 she moved with him from Middleton, VT to Cass county, MI.
  • Change Date: 19 JUL 1999



    Father: Amos FRISBIE b: 17 FEB 1729 in Branford, CT
    Mother: Mary LUDDINGTON

    Marriage 1 Asahel DUTTON b: 2 FEB 1753 in Wallingford, New Haven, Cn c: 4 FEB 1756
    • Married: 3 NOV 1772 in Woodbury, CT
    Children
    1. Has Children Asahel E. DUTTON b: ABT 1774 in CT
    2. Has No Children Elias DUTTON b: ABT 1775

    Marriage 2 Samuel NORTHROP b: 18 OCT 1755 in Milford, CT
    • Married: 3 JUN 1779 in Washington, CT
    Children
    1. Has No Children Amos Frisbie NORTHROP b: 4 JAN 1799 in Middleton, Rutland, VT

    Sources:
    1. Text: The evidence that Asahel Dutton and Sarah Frisbie were the parents of Asahel E. Dutton is circumstantial, but highly pursuasive:
      1.Asahel and Sarah's birth dates and marriage date are appropriate for them being the parents of the younger Asahel.
      2. The fact that both men had the same name is an obvious clue.
      3. The younger Asahel named one of his sons James Frisbie Dutton. James Frisbie was the name of one of Sarah's brothers.
      4. James Frisbie shared a claim to land in Bradford county, Pennsylvania with Solomon Moss, who was the father-in-law of the younger Asahel Dutton.
      5. The families of both the suspected parents and Asahel E. Dutton all moved to Poultney, VT. Sarah Frisbie and 4 of her brothers moved to the Poultney area when the younger Asahel was a young child. Further, the sister of the elder Asahel, Lois Dutton, moved to Poultney. The first docuement event involving the younger Asahel was his moving from Poultney in 1800.
    2. Text: Edward Frisbie of Branford and His Descendants, by Nora G. Frisbie. Published 1984 by Gateway Press, Inc.
    3. Text: Families of Ancient New Haven, compiled by Donald Lines Jacobus, published by Clarence D. Smith, Rome, NY, 1923
  •  

    CORNWALL write to hist Soc sent 4/8/09 no further information

    CornHistSoc@optonline.net

    THE SOUTHPORT CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH p.77
    464. Sarah Elizabeth Hughes; letter from Second Congregational Church, Cornwall, Conn., Jan. 5, 1894; married Frederic Elmore Northrop; letter to Methodist Episcopal Church, Southport, Conn., Dec. 23, 1898.

    Full text of "The Southport Congregational church, Southport, Connecticut, March 7, 1843-November 30, 1915; an historical sketch, together with the confession, the covenant"

     

    The History of Litchfield, Conn. 1720 - 1920 - Google Books Result

    by Alain C. White - 2006 - Reference
    Originally, Bantam Falls and Bradleyville were divided like the rest of the ... It was located opposite the Bantam Burying Ground, and completed in 1797. ...
    books.google.com/books?isbn=0976634279... -

     

     

     


    A JUDD NORTHROP GENEALOGY

    AMOS ISSUES


    AMOS BRIEF TIMELINE-CENSUS

    FAMILY NAMES

    NEIGHBOR NAMES

    DETAILED TIMELINE

    MAP 1766

    MAP 1777

    MAP 1780


    MAP 1829

    MAP WOODVILLE ROADS

    MAP WOODVILLE SATELLITE

    ~ ~ ~

    Amos
    Parent / Name
    Speculations



    Amos may have been a farmer, shoemaker (his eldest son Alvin was a shoemaker) or in a profession related to leather

    Chatham, NY reported as birthplace is suspicious. May be Chatham, CT (Alvords) or wrong Northrop line.

    Names WITH connections - Amos, Burr

    Names with possible connections - Gerrit, George, Fenn, Elmore, Winthrop, Blaine, Anzonetta /Antoinetta

    Amos had 2 known children but possibly more.

    Amos might have even spent some time in Berkshire County, MA.

     

     

     


    Northrops


    Family Tree
     
    Before the founder England
     Joseph Northrup            
    1619(1639)-1669 Milford
     Joseph Northrup             narrrow
    1649 Milford ~ ???1700
     James Northrop              
    1693 Milford ~ 1747
     James Northrop
                 
    1719 Ridgefield ~ 1784
     Amos Northrop              
    1778? Milford 1855 Warren
     Alvin Northrop                
    1803 Ridgefield, Kent, Milford, Salem ~1875 or 86
     George Elmore  Northrop
    1844 Cornwall~1906 Southport
     George Ives  Northrop     
    1871 Southport ~ 1923 Southport
     Alvin Jennings  Northrop  
    1905 Southport/Norwalk ~ 1980 Fairfield

    Hannigan

    Ives

    Jennings

    Keeler

    Webster (offsite)

    This is a work in process and there are still other possible fathers for Amos.

    Other Amos Father Possibilities arrow

     

    Amos Northrop b ~ 1779-80 (census dates)

    Some of the epitaphs are in the form of admonition to the living to reform their ways that they may die in peace - the Rev. Joseph Bellamy's stone.

    Beneath the roots of tangled weeds,
    Afar in country graveyards lie,
    The men whose unrecorded deeds,
    Have stamped this nation's destiny

     

    The prosperity of the town of Kent was checked with the advent of the railroad. It was once a flourishing community when every night twenty- one two and four horse teams could be seen entering the town from the direction of Quaker hill loaded with iron ore to be cast into pigs and then hauled thirty miles to Poughkeepsie to market. The crack of the whips of so many drivers is gone and the charm of the town now lies in its quietness and solitude.

    .....The period of the settlement of Kent was that of Connecticut's first attack of the western fever, and this is how it was brought on. As has been said, but little value was attached to the teritory of Litchfield county, before the beginning of the last century. There was lan<l enough nearer the center of the colony, and the population was still too limited for the peopling of new towns. But after the reinstatement of the colonial charter in 1694, and the consequent restored security of the colony, enterprise, which had languished during the reign of James, revived, the population of the colony increased, and inquiry began to be made for territory for new settlements. The earliest response to this demand, in this section of the state,.was the exploration and sale of the territory of the town of Litchfield. This territory was included in the "Western Lands" conveyed by the colony to the towns of Hartford and Windsor in 1686-7, and the sale of it was the ilrst disposal of that territory which the towns had made. In the spring of 1715, a committee of these towns, of whom John Marsh, the ancestor of the Marshes of Litchfield, was one, and the seeming chief, visited the region, "viewed" it, and secured deeds of it from the Indians; their bills for service, against the towns, giving intimation of the primitive wildness of the region, as by the following items from the Hartford records: —...

    The sale of the territory of Litchfleld by the towns of Hartford and Windsor, roused the colony to assert its claim to the Western Lands, and in 1719 at the May session, the legislature enacted: —

    "That the whole of said tract of Land shall lie for the further dispose of this assembly, and all surveyors and persons appointed to lay out lands, are hereby forbidden to bound or lay out any of said land without the special order of this assembly."

    Nevertheless, Hartford and Windsor went on disposing of the land, and a fierce controversy arose between the colony on the one side, and these two towns and the settlers in the Western Lands to whom they had sold tracts, on the other, which was settled as records show, by compromise, in 1726, the colony taking one, the western half, and the two towns the other, the eastern half; Litchfield, as already disposed of, being left out of the division.

    This long controversy had thoroughly advertised the unsettled lands,

    1738; Cornwall at Fairfield, in February of the same year; Kent at Windham, in March;

    ...young men "went west to grow up with the country;" and all north and east of Kent was alive, as was itself, with the interest of.new settlement.

    all at once," to use a familiar phrase, the country sprang into life at the period of the settlement of Kent: Nortnbury church, organized 1740; Westbury, 1740; Bethlehem, 1740; Washington, 1742; Kent, 174i; Goshen, 1740; Cornwall, 1741; Canaan, 1741; Torrington, 1741; Harwinton, 1737; New Hartford, 1738. So that Kent was by no means born alone. Its settlement was but one manifestation of a movement that pervaded the colony, the first great set of Connecticut's westward tide; the tide that, with its successive flowings, has peopled the continent with its best inhabitants and noblest life.

    While the new life of Kent society was crystalizing into form, the same process of the beginnings of religious and civil organization was going on in the communities around it. As the primeval forest still covered this parish, unbroken save by the settler's clearings, so over Litchfield county the primitive wilderness stretched unbroken, save where here and there the centres were being established of the several towns. It is the period from which the life of Litehfield county takes its date.

    Westbury, now Watertown, was constituted an ecclesiastical society in 1738, the same year as Kent.

    In Bethlehem, the first settlers are petitioning the General Assembly to be constituted a distinct society, which petition was granted at the October session, 1739, and the church was organized the following spring, March 27, 1740.

    In Washington, too, the first settlement is under way, the pioneer settler, Joseph Hurlburt, locating there in 1736, and the community petitioning in 1741, to be organized into an ecclesiastical society, which was done by the General Assembly at the October session of that year, the society being named "Judea," likely from the hill country of Palestine, which of old bore that name. Immediately on the organization of the society, the building of the meeting-house was proceeded with, the inhabitants stating, in a petition to the General Assembly in May 1742,that they had "Unanymously and Lovingly Agreed upon a place for to set a Meeting House; ' the only instance of the kind in the early history of the county. The house was built during the same year; the cnurch being organized Sept. 1st., 1742; Rev. Reuben Judd, the first pastor being ordained the same day; the ceremonies taking place in a grove—the other society in the town, that of New Preston, was organized October, 1752.

    Into the "Wilderness" the first invasion was the settlement of Litchfield, and this introduces us to one of the most curious and interesting chapters of Connecticut history, as well as to a matter which early engaged the attention of Northbury; it being the subject of a controversy which the new society waged with the mother town, from the time of its organization as a society until after it became a town itself—the famous affair of the"Western Lands." In the records of Waterbury, 1741, there is the following entry with reference to the matter: —

    "There having been considerable discourse about the money for which the western lands were sold and granted for the use of the school, and not agreeing in what method it should be disposed of, (the town) did by vote agree that they would refer it to some indifferent gentlemen, to be decided by them where the said money shall be disposed, whether it belongs to the first parish (of Waterbury) or should be divided among the several parishes (including Westbury and Northbury)."

    What were these "western lands?" The original title to the territory of New England was the grant, in 1620, by James I. to the Plymouth Company, of England of

    "All that part of America lying and being in breadth from the fortieth degree of north latitude, from the equinoctial line, to the forty-eighth degree of said northerly latitude inclusively, and in length of and with all the breadth aforesaid, throughout the main land from sea to sea."

    Among the first division of Kent were:
    Ephraim Hubbel, multiple m. Abigail Bradley d. Kent, Sherwood, Noble, Fuller
    Peter Hubbel, multiple of greenfield connection to betts,, hurlburt
    Richard Hubbel, multiple stratford, ffld, newtown fairweather, burritt wheeler
    Jedediah Hubbel (also as JH, Esq. both later)...Fairfield, Newtown Stratfield Bradley (mother) Noble, Northrop, Hickox, Hurlbut, Wheeler later Lanesboro
    Johnathan Hubbel, multiple Fairfield, Newtown, Stratforfd Bethlehem, Derby Prudden, Burr, Silliman Morehouse,Wakeman in 1631 in Eng Alford m. in Ill

    Samuel Canfleld, multiple Samuel Canfield and others,

    and later
    John Smith, multipleDavid Smith,Nathaniel Smith,
    Joseph Fuller,
    Pelatiah Marsh.Cyrus Marsh, ,multipleEbenezer Marsh, multiple ,Heirs of Colonel Ebenezer Marsh,William Marsh
    Azariah Pratt, Daniel Pratt, multiple Joseph Pratt Jr., Daniel Pratt, Peter Pratt,
    Joseph Peck,
    John Porter,
    ,Nathaniel Sanford,
    Nathaniel Sanford and Henry Silsby,
    Jabez Swift, multipleZephania Swift,
    Nathaniel Slosson,
    Isaac Camp, Isaac Camp

    1738,

    The old deeds refer frequently to the Fairweather purchase, but as there is no deed on record in Kent of this property a search was made through the old colonial records where it was found that in 1707 there was a large tract of land granted to Hon. Nathaniel Gold, Peter Burr and several others of Fairfleld for a township in what is now the southern portion of Kent and the northern portion of New Milford, and that they in turn sold a part or all of it to Robert Silliman, Richard Hubbell and Benjamin Fairweather, the latter being described as the "cornet of the troop in Fairfleld." The latter's purchase contained some 3,800 acres and was six miles in length from east to west and three hundred rods wide. When the owner died the large tract was divided between his heirs.

    1826

    About this time there was considerable agitation to have a canal from Stockbridge, Mass., to tide water at Derby. This is the language of the resolution the town meeting passed: "That we claim it is the interest and duty of every individual situated near the proposed route to aid and assist in the completion of this object oy endeavoring to promote and otherwise concert in measures calculated to effect it by lending funds as circumstances may enable and the vastness of the undertaking may require. That no other route to tide water heretofore suggested is by us regarded as equally important or can equally well accommodate this town or that portion of the public subjected to land carriage which lies between the Connecticut and Hudson rivers."

    May. 1739, passed a resolution that "the military companies in the towns of Kent, Woodbury, New Milford, Litchfleld, Cornwall, Goshen, Canaan, Norfolk, Salisbury, Sharon, and New Pairfleld shall be one entire regiment to be distinguished by the name of the Thirteenth regiment."

    ...The War of the Revolution impoverished where it did not devastate. For many years there was practically no money. Mr. Bordwell was from necessity a farmer, and during the long winter a tutor as well; for like most of the ministers of the day, he fitted many a boy for college. The spiritual destitution of the period was even greater than the material. Skepticism and infidelity were rampant, and the church that held its own did well.

    ...wife of John Millard, Sr.
    1776.
    Widow Rebeckah Millard,

    1784.
    Abram Beecher and his wife,
    Lois Coleman,
    Aaron Coleman,

    i807.
    Dr. Oliver Fuller and his wife,
    Aurelia Northrop,

    1816 Hannah Fenn,

    Record Is incomplete previous to 1812, and there is no means by which the manner of removal from the church can be ascertained.

    no record after 1812 on -- so maybe before 1812 or not members of this church?

    EPISCOPAL
    The next rector was Samuel Clark, who went to New Milford in 1768. He was a native of West Haven and a graduate of Yale college. Under him the first real attempts at organization were made. They are upon the parish register two very old documents of his day; they are the earliest records the parish now possesses. The first of these papers is dated at New Milford February 7, 1770; it is a receipt to Reuben Swift for his ministerial (church tax) for the year 1769. The second is dated Dec. 2, 1771, and shows that occasional services were being kept. It is a notice of Mr. Clark's intention to preach in Kent the coming Sunday. It was owing to the co-operation of this worthy layman, Reuben Swift, that the church for which Mr. Palmer began to gather subscriptions in 1760, was finally built in 1772 or early in 1773. Mr. Swift lived just to see it finished as he died the same year. This ancient building stood about thirty yards to the south of the present church. It was afterwards converted into a town hall, and still later the frame was used for a barn, now the property of George Hopson.

    Mr. Clark remained at his post until 1787 when he migrated to Nova Scotia. The years 1768-87 covered by Mr. Clark's ministry were dark days for the church in America. The nearest bishop was 3,000 miles across the Atlantic. It was not until 1785 that a bishop set foot upon these shores. Besides the want of a bishop there were other hardships to bear. The church was small in numbers; she was hated and despised by the multitude who regarded Episcopacy as hostile to civil as well as religious liberty. When the war really broke out many of the clergy had to fiee, others were persecuted and imprisoned, churches were closed, many of them desecrated and defiled by the mob.

    In 1790 Rev. Truman Marsh was stationed at New Milford and remained for nine years, and it is probable he looked after the church in Kent. In February, 1808, the parish was duly organized according to the state laws, the first officers being Lewis St. John, clerk; Reuben Booth, moderator; John Smith, treasurer. In May following Rev. Sturgis Gilbert was offered $6 to preach every third Sunday during the summer. May 4, 1809, a meeting was called to see whether the society would adopt the constitution of the church in America as set forth by general convention. From 1808 to 1816 yearly meetings were held on the great plain of Kent as it was then called. In the latter year the old church was renovated. In September Mr. Gilbert was released from his contract. The records are broken from here until 1819, when in April of that year at the annual meeting the committee of the church were authorized to lay out the present subscriptions lately obtained in hiring, as it was said, Rev. George B. Andrews to officiate as clergyman. Under him the old church which had been built nearly fifty- two years in 1820 was consecrated. Mr. Andrews immediately afterward set to work to build the present edifice. On September 30, 1822, a meeting was called to adopt plans for building. Jeremiah Fuller, John H. Swift, Garrett Winegar, Alpheus Fuller, and John Hurd, were chosen as a building committee. The original papers, contracts, etc., are still preserved. Various subscription papers tell of the struggles of the faithful few to get the church built. Those who had no money to give gave of their goods, timber, stone, brick, or lime, anything in short, that would prove available as building,

    M. E. CHURCH AT GAYLORDSV1LLE.

    Many of the people in the southern part of the town are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church in Gaylordsville, and that church must not be overlooked in enumerating the religious forces of the town. For many years it has maintained regular preaching services at Ore Hill and Bulls Bridge. Situated at the Center, as the churches are, there are many who find it difficult to reach them, and the neighborhood Sunday schools at South Kent, Bulls Bridge, Macedonia, and North Keat have been, and are, of inestimable value.

    Mention should here be made of Rev. Wm. H. Kirk, a consecrated Reformed Methodist minister, who was for fifty-one years a resident of tho town of Kent. He was born of Scottish parentage in Springfield, Vermont, March 24, 1824. His mother was a lineal descendant of Robert Bruce, the eminent Scottish chief, and a daughter of Rev. Rufus Bruce of Chester, Vermont. Mr. Kirk was converted to Christ at the age of ten years, and for sixty-one years was a devout Christian. He edited for several years the denominational paper of his church, which was published under the name of "The Banner and Banquet." His church granted him license as an exhorter at the age of seventeen years and in 1844, at a sitting of the Vermont annual conference of the Reformed Methodist church he was ordained an elder in said church, which office he held until his death on February 19, 1896, at Kent. He was always under appointment by his conference as pastor, visiting elder or evangelist, in which capacity he labored faithfully and successfully in different states in the Union. Mr. Kirk was an anti-slavery man during the days of slavery, and was one of the only three men in the town of Kent to vote the anti-slavery ticket when that ticket was first presented to the people, the other two being the late Rev. Jeremiah Fry and the late Deacon Lewis Spooner. He thereafter voted with the Republican party until the excitement of war times began to subside when it was discovered that the greatest foe to our race was the liquor traffic. Accordingly, he identified himself with the Prohibition party. Possessing great strength of character and independence of thought, he was never misunderstood as to his sentiments. He was the champion of every cause and measure that tended to suppress vice and exalt virtue. Sympathetic and kind towards the suffering and distressed, he was often called to comfort bereaved ones in officiating at funerals until he had attended one thousand during his ministry He took a Christian interest In the welfare of the Scatacook Indians and many of them, under his influence became Christians. The oldest remaining members of the tribe declare him to have been the first person to visit their reservation and tell them they "had souls and might have a Saviour." January 12, 1845, he was married to Miss Maria Houghton of Pownall. Vermont. Their three children were: Sarah A., wife of Edward Eaton, of Warren; Laura J., wife of Edward Thorpe, and a resident of Danvers, Mass., and Charles F., who married Miss Lillian Newton, and resides in Kent.

    While of a social nature, of Mr. Kirk it could be truly said he feared God, and feared nothing else but sin. Eminently successful as a revivalist, many of the members of different churches in and around Kent were converted under his labors and teaching. For a period of more than three years previous to his death he was an invalid, suffering from a partial paralysis and other diseases.

    In 1757, Jabez Smith was chosen overseer of the tribe; being the first officer of the kind appointed for the Scatacooks.

    History of Kent, Connecticut: Including Biographical Sketches of ... - Google Books Result by Francis Atwater - 1897 - Reference - 176 pages
    1777— Ephraim Hubbell, Captain Justus Sackett, Captain Jethro Hatch. ... Carter, Captain Jedediah Hubbell. 1779— Major Jethro Hatch, Captain Justus Sackett, ...
    books.google.com/books?id=swgWAAAAYAAJ... -

     

    History of Bethlehem society

    "east part of the north purchase-- not divided among proprietors until 1734 remained woodland

    Among the first proprietors -- from the first society (woodbury) came Reuben and Josiah Avered

    1739 allowed to set up minister and school Rev Joseph Bellamy at age 22

    Fall of 1740 Mr. Whitefireld preached through country religion was revived 1750 the "nervous fever prevailed and spread== not enough wel l to take care of the sick and - a mortal distemper carried off 30 persons in the prime of their life.

    1791 Rev Azel Bakus was ordained and settled in Bethlehem.he also "fitted boys for college" teaching latin and greek . later left to become president of hamilton college (1813).

    1787 society incorporated into a town

    Bethlem is a small town, ita average length being four and a half miles, and its breadth four miles. Its population by the census of 1850, was 815. It is almost wholly an agricultural town, its soil being fertile, with little waste land. It has, however, one woolen manufactory, two wagon shops, three saw-mills, one grist-mill, three cider distilleries, one blacksmith's shop, one shoemaker's shop, and three mercantile stores. It also has two churches, a town hall, a flourishing lyceum, two ministers and one physician.

    --------------

    washington

    The present town of Washington is made up of territory taken from the towns of Woodbury, New Milford, Kent, and Litchfield, and is about six miles square. It contains two ecclesiastical societies, Judea and New Preston, though not the whole of the latter is included within the town. Judea society embraces all the territory taken from Woodbury and Litchfield, and constitutes about two-thirds of the extent of the town. But a small portion of this is contributed by Litchfield. New Preston embraces all the territory taken from Kent and New Milford. In both of these societies are Episcopal churches, having houses for religious worship. The first settlement in the town was made in Judea society, in 1734, the year this society and Bethlehem were divided among the proprietors of Woodbury. Joseph Hurlbut was the first settler, and the first framed house was built in 1736. The next settlers after Hurlbut were Increase Moseley, Nathaniel Durkee, John Baker, Friend Weeks, Joseph Gillett and Samuel Pitcher. The first sermon preached in the society was by Isaac Baldwin, of Litchfield, who afterward relinquished his profession, and became the first clerk of the county court for Litchfield county

    Five years later, the inhabitants had become more numerous, and twenty persons preferred a memorial to the General Assembly, at its May session, 1739, representing that they lived " full eight miles from the Meeting House," and that their wives and children had " to . tarry at home from the worship of God about half of the year," and therefore they pray for " liberty to have preaching six months in the winter," and to be released from paying taxes for a new school-house just built in the first society, and also from parish taxes, that they may build a school-house of their own. The privilege asked for was granted, to continue two years, and they were released from one-half of the parish taxes, and from taxes to build a new meeting-house, provided they were " in no ways Active in the Affair of Building a new Meeting House in said first Society."1 At the October session, 1741, twenty-six individuals petitioned to be incorporated into an ecclesiastical society, and appointed " Our Trusty and well-beloved friend, Friend Weeks, agent and attorney to prosecute our Petition." The petition was signed by Nathaniel Durkee, John Baker, Joseph Gillett, Joseph Chittenden, Elisha Stone, Samuel Pitcher, Jr., James Pitcher, Increase Moseley, Lemuel Baker, Daniel Castle, Samuel Branton, Ezra Terrill, Jr., Ebenezer Allen, Zadock Clark, Elijah Hurd, Joseph Hurd, Joseph Hurlbut, Benjamin Ingraham, Jr., Robert Durkee, Samuel Bell, Jonah Titus, Benjamin Ingraham, John Royce, John Hurd, Jr., Jedediah Hurd, Benjamin Hinman
    non-resident owners will not sell to settlers.

    till the troubles arose which involved the country in the war of the Revolution. The unhappy divisions in this society then arose to a high pitch. Almost the entire people became dissatisfied with their minister, though no heresy nor scandal was alleged against him. This contention finally ceased, after which Mr. Brinsmads was much respected till his death,

    December, 1795, Rev. Ebenezer Porter came here and preached the greater part of the time till his ordination Sept. 7, 1796 Dr. Porter was dismissed from his pastoral charge, Dec. 18,1811, having been elected Professor of Andover Theological Seminary.-not far from the so-called ' Athens of America."

    In 1753, a putrid fever prevailed in this society, of which twenty or thirty died in six months. In 1776, the dysentery prevailed with great mortality. About thirty persons were swept away by it to the grave. During the preceding year, not a single death occurred, and for the last twenty years preceding 1812, the average mortality in the society was but about one per cent, of the population per annum.

     

    During the first seventy years after the establishment of the church, the people of Judea were uniformly prosperous and happy. They were never divided—never split into sects—but deservedly acquired the reputation of being industrious, orderly and harmonious, with but one exception. The exception alluded to, was during the last ten years of Mr. Brinsmade's ministrations, from 1774 to 1784. This was a contention concerning the half-way covenant system, and it is worthy of notice, that during this whole period of ten years, but three members were added to the church. Thus do contentions, even for just causes, ever diminish the prosperity of the church.

    There have been several revivals, by which considerable numbers were added to the church, as follows: fifty-four in 1804; twenty in 1816; fifty-eight in 1821 ; twenty-nine in 1825; twenty-two in 1827 ; and one hundred and thirty-one in 1831.

    n October, 1748, eleven persons dwelling in the south-eastern part of Kent, and nine living in the north-eastern part of New Milford, petitioned the General Assembly for liberty to hire a minister six months in the year, on the ground of their living " from seven to ten miles from their places of worship in New Milford and Kent." This request was granted, to continue four years, with exemption from parish rates. Before the end of the four years, in May, 1752, forty- one individuals petitioned for a new ecclesiastical society. Their names were Samuel Averill, Caleb Rude, Samuel Lake, Moses Aver- ill, Henry Davis, Jehiel Murray, Isaac Averill, Joseph Carey, John Guthrie, Daniel Averill, Zebulon Palmer, Jacob Kinne, Samuel Cogs- well, Thomas Hodgship, Thos. Morris, Benj. Darling, Samuel Waller, Nathaniel Deuine, Enoch Whjttlesey, Joseph Jons, Stephen Bos- worth, Thomas Beeman, John Benedict, Stephen Noble, Gilead Sperry, Elnathan Curtis, John Bostwick, Benajah Bostwick, Matthew Beale, John Cogswell, Zephaniah Branch, Edward Cogswell, Emerson Cogswell, Josiah Cogswell, James Terrill, Joseph Miles, Nathan Hawley, Samuel Cogswell, John Cobb, Benjamin Capuen.

    At the same session, sixteen persons of East Greenwich, (now Warren,) remonstrated against the incorporation of a new society, stating that their society had lost " thirty-five rateable persons, and £1467 on their list," and that they therefore protest against having any part of their society cut off, as no families can be spared. Kent, at the same time, passed a vote, that this statement was true. New Milford also sent a committee to oppose the application, and it failed. In October, 1753, thirty-nine persons "in the Northern part of New Milford, and the South and South East part of Kent, and a place Called Merry-all," renewed the application for an ecclesiastical society, which was granted, and the society called New Preston, with the following boundaries :

    " Beginning at the South east corner of New Milford North Purchase, then tunning Southwardly joining upon Woodbury line one mile, from thence running a West line to ye part of the Long Mountain, South West of Capt. Bastwick's farm, then a Northline to the place called the Rockhorse Cobble, and so that course to Merryall line, and then across Merryall to Kent line, and then Running East to the South West corner of James Lake's farm North Easterly to the North West corner of John Henderson's farm, that he now lives on, then running East to East Greenwich line, then running South to y« South West corner of East Greenwich line to Sheppauge river, then running Southwardly upon s<l river to Woodbury Ijne, then running Westwardly on Woodbury line to y« first mentioned bounds," <kc.

    The first meeting of the society was held at the house of Jacob Kinne, Nov. 23, 1753. The officers chosen were Benajah Bostwick, Clerk, and Samuel "Waller, Stephen Noble and Joseph Gary, Society's Committee. A vote was then passed to " meet at Jacob Kinne's house for 3 months for public AVorship in the winter season," provided they could obtain a minister. John Bostwick, Samuel Waller and Samuel Averill, were appointed a committee to hire a minister for three months. On the first Monday in December following, the society laid a tax of 12rf. on the pound, to hire a minister " for a season." They also voted to build by subscription, " two school-houses for the use of the society, one to be located between Nathaniel Bost- wick's house and Steep Brook, in ye Highway, and the other near Joseph Gary's in the Highway." The following vote also passed :

    There have been several revivals, which added considerable numbers to the church : thirty in 1780 ; twenty-five in 1804 ; thirteen in 1812 ; eighty in 1816 ; forty-one in 1821; thirteen in 1826 ; thirty- eight in 1827 ; and thirteen in 1829.

    Washington, composed of the two societies of Judea and New Preston, was the first town incorporated in the state, after the declaration of independence. It was incorporated at a special session of the General Assembly, January 7,1779. The petitioners, who numbered forty-seven in Kent, one hundred and seventy-six in Woodbury, twenty in Litchfield, and twenty in New Milford, desired the Assembly to call their town by the name of Hampden, but their agents were persuaded to consent to have it called Washington, in honor of the commander-in-chief of the American armies. Its first meeting was held February 11, 1779, and William Cogswell was the first moderator.

    Its boundaries are as follows:

    " Beginning at the south-west corner of Judea parish; thence running a straight line easterly, to the south-west corner of Bethlehem, five miles and about one quarter of a mile; thence North by Bethlehem to Litchfield line, it being the north-west corner of Bethlehem ; thence continuing north in a straight line, to the north-east corner of the tract annexed from Litchfield; (the east line of Washington, so far as it is straight, is between five and six miles;) thence in a north-westerly direction, across the western part of Mount Tom, to Mount Tom bridge, crossing the western branch of Sheppauge river : thence in a line westerly, between Washington and Warren, to the West Pond; thence across said pond ninety rods to Fairweather's Grant. The diagonal line from the northeast corner of Washington to Mount Tom bridge, is about two miles and an half: the north line is about five miles in length. From the northwest corner of Washington the line runs about South, between Washington and

    Kent, one mile and a half to New Milford line; thence still South to the South line of New Milford, north purchase ; thence Southerly to the South-east bounds of the parish of New Preston, about one mile and an half; thence by New Mil- ford, about three miles and an half to the first mentioned bounds."

    This is a good agricultural town, and has a considerable manufacturing interest. There are within its limits, six mercantile stores, employing a capital of from $12,000 to $15,000 ; one woolen manufactory, employing a capital of some $10,000, and making from 70,000 to 80,000 yards of cloth annually. There are two forges, not now in operation, and one cotton manufactory. There are two pocket furnaces with machine shops attached, employing from twelve to twenty men each, four wagon shops, one saddler's shop, one tannery, one chair and cabinet shop, one manufactory for making carpet yarn and seine twine, and fourteen saw-mills. From 600 to 1,000 casks of lime are annually burned, and from 25,000 to 30,000 feet of marble per annum, are quarried and sawed. There are three Congregational churches, and two Episcopal; a celebrated female seminary, under the care of Miss Brinsmade, and a select school for boys, under the care of Frederick W. Gunn, A. B. There is also a good circulating library. The population of the town, by the census of 1850, is 1,802.

    In 1708, an act of toleration passed, allowing all persons who should conform to it, the liberty of worshiping God in a way separate from that established by law, but it did not excuse them from paying taxes to the approved, settled ministers of the churches. In 1727, the members of the church of England made an application to the legislature to be exempted from paying taxes for the support 'of the ministry of any other denomination, and for liberty to tax themselves for the support of their own ministry. Accordingly an act was passed, directing that all persons within the limits of a parish, belonging to the church of England, and to the churches established by law, should be taxed by the same rule, and in the same proportion, for the support of the ministry in such parish, and where there was a society of the church of England, so near to any person who had declared himself to be of that church, that he could conveniently and did ordinarily attend public worship there, then the collector of the tax, on levying the same, should pay it to that minister of the church of England on which such person attended, who should have power to receive and recover the same ; and when the amount so obtained should be insufficient for the support of any such minister, the members of the society were vested with the power of taxing themselves, and they were also exempted from paying taxes for building or repairing the meeting-houses of the established churches. The same privileges were afterward granted to other dissenters from the established faith. In the revision of 1784, all dissenters were exempted from paying taxes to the established societies, where they had a society of their own and contributed to its support, on lodging a certificate from such church or society, properly authenticated, of the fact of such membership. Some disputes having arisen as to the validity of such certificates, and suspicions arising that an undue advantage was taken of the law, an act was passed, May, 1791, directing that certificates to be valid, must be approved by a justice of the peace. This law excited general disapprobation, and in October, the same year, an act was passed, authorizing dissenters to make certificates in their own names, and lodge them with the clerk of the society, in the limits of which they lived, which should exempt them from taxes as long as they ordinarily attended public worship in the society which they joined, and dissenting societies were authorized to tax themselves for all the purposes of other ecclesiastical societies. This was in effect placing all religious denominations on the same footing. Yet there was a nominal distinction, members of one society being obliged to lodge certificates with another. But now by the constitution, all distinction among societies is done away, and all denominations are placed on equal ground.

    History of ancient Woodbury, Connecticut

    By William Cothren

    Abel line

    Medina in 184.6.—Medina, the county-seat, is on the stage road from Cleveland to Columbus, twenty-eight miles from the first and one hundred and seventeen from the latter. It was originally called Mecca—and is so marked on the early maps of Ohio—from the Arabian city famous as the birth-place of Mahomet. It was afterwards changed to its present name, being the seventh place on the globe of that name. The others are, Medina, a town of Arabia Deserta, celebrated as the burial-place of Mahomet; Medina, the capital of the kingdom of Woolly, West Africa ; Medina, a town and fort on the island of Bahrein, near the Arabian shore of the Persian gulf; Medina, a town in Estremadura, Spain; Medina, Orleans county, Js. Y., and Medina, Lenawee county, Michigan.

    On the organization of the county in 1818, the first court was held in a barn, now standing half a mile north of the court-house. The village was laid out that year, and the next season a few settlers moved in. The township had been previously partially settled. In 1813 Zenas Hamilton moved into the central part with his family, from Danbury, Conn. His nearest neighbor was some eight or ten miles distant. Shortly after came the families of Rufus Ferris, Timothy Doane, Lathrop Seymour, James Moore, Isaac Barnes, Joseph Northrop, Friend Ives, Abijah Mann, James Palmer, William Painter, Frederick Apple- ton, etc., etc.

    Rev. Roger Searle, an Episcopalian, was the first clergyman, and the first church was in the eastern part of the township where was then the most population. It was a log structure, erected in 1817. One morning all the materials were standing, forming a part of the forest, and in the afternoon Rev. Mr. Searle preached a sermon in the finished ehnrch.*

     

    Page 246 [No. 741]. The children of Wealthy Pomeroy were: i Emeline, born Oct. 17, 1799, in Hudson, N. Y.; m. Frederick J. Barnard, of Albany; d. June 18, 1833, while at Hartford. 2 George, m. Lucy Huntington. 3 Samuel Pomeroy, a physician; m. Caroline Jenkins; Mrs. Marcellus Hartley, 232 Madison Ave., N. Y. City, is his daughter. 4 Jane Augusta, d. unm. 5 Frances, m. Rev. William Chester. 6 John C., m. Lavinia Maxwell. 7 Sarah, d. unm. 8 Elizabeth, m. Ambrose Russell. 9 Henry Kirk, d. unm. 10 Anna, m. C. T. Leake. 11 Elizabeth Pomeroy, m. (i) John Hosmer, of Hudson; (2) Frederick J. Barnard, whose first wife was her half-sister; ch.: i Fannie Hosmer, m. Frederick Hastings, of Brainerd's Bridge; several ch.; one, Catherine, m. Rev. Henry Neill, and d. July 10, 1845, leaving two ch.: Catharine and Henry. 12 Chauncey Pomeroy, m. Mary Northrop Ives, dau. of Elihu and Lucy (Whittemore) Ives, of New Haven; she d. Jan. 3, 1881; he d. Aug. 4, 1888; ch.: Jane Eliza, b. at Girard, Ga., June 15, 1845; m. Dec. 24, 1866, at Montgomery, Ala., Edgar James Lee, born Dec. 5, 1838, in Montgomery, son of Henry Porter and Betsey Ann (Nickelson) Lee; they removed about 1873 to Troy, Pa.; ch.: (i) Bessie Pomeroy, b. Nov. 21, 1867, in Montgomery; (2) Charles Landers, b. June 19, 1869, in Montgomery; (3) Mary Chauncey, b. April 15, 1871, in Montgomery; (4) Emma Redington, b. April 5, 1874, in Troy; (5) Kate, b. April 2, 1876; (6) Pomeroy, b. April 27, 1877; (7) Edgar Henry, b. June 28, 1879; (8) Montague, b. Oct. 8, 1881; (9) infant daughter, b. June 23, 1883; d. Nov. 9, 1883.

     

    Amity embraced Woodbridge and Bethany Thomas Sanford Match manufacturing first in Oxford then in Woodbeidge

    One of the earliest grist mills inNew Haven County was located atSperry's Falls, a reminder of whichexists today in a huge broken mill-stone lying near the ancient founda-tions. Later there was a carding milland a clothier's shop on the same site.Near the head of Lake Dawson, LeviPeck had a factory where iron candlesticks were made. Later, organs andmelodeons were made in the sameestablishment. Below Lake Dawson,Elioenai Clark made coffins and cabi-net work. There were saw and gristmills in various parts of the town.Capt. James Baldwin followed hisancestors in making flour at the mill TOTHER HOUSE, F. G. P. :BARNES.
    west of Button Ball Corner. "Aunt
    Hannah's Flour," made here, was locally celebrated a few generations ago. There was once a clock fac-tory operated by John Northrop, west of the Church, near the home of Henry C. Baldwin. There wasa nail factory in the ravine, and bolts were made at the sawmill place, west of the Church. Over in theWest River Valley, on the hillside opposite Lake Dawson, are to be seen two ruinous piles of masonry whosegreat arches remind one of Roman remains. These are kilns in which cement was once burned from rockquarried near by. The quality of the product not being high, the business was of short life.
    PAGE TWENTY-ONE
    The most important manufacturingindustry connected with -Woodbridge,was the match business. This town isreally the birthplace of the frictionmatch. The inventor was ThomasSanford, whose title to the distinctionis permanently secured by a decision ofthe U. S. Court. Mr. Sanford madethe invention while living in the neigh-boring town of Oxford. But his firstshop was in -Woodbridge, in a part ofthe house now occupied by RobertPayne as a residence. "Next he movedhis business to a larger shop, west ofand at the foot of Round Hill. Theruins of this building, which has justfallen in, may be seen near the so-called
    MRS. MORRIS F. TYLER. Sanford Place. Still later, Mr. San-ford built another shop further downBladen's Brook. The best known
    manufacturer of matches in Woodbridge, was William A. Clark, whose shop was on Bladen's Brook, below
    Mr. Sanford's. Mr. Clark was a man of large enterprise and a great inventor and improver of match-
    making machinery. A considerable settlement grew up in the neighborhood of his factory. In those days
    the paper match boxes had to be made by hand. This created an industry which was carried on far and
    wide by women and girls in their homes, in this and in surrounding towns. The Clark business was
    absorbed by the Diamond Match Company. The Woodbridge factory was operated till 1885.
    PAGE TWENTY-TWO

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    Amity and the town of Woodbridge became territorially one, the old name was unfortunately ... Built about 1785 by Abel Sanford. After- .... tory operated by John Northrop, west of the Church, near the home of Henry C. Baldwin. There was ...
    www.woodbridgehistory.org/books/woodbridge_hills.pdf - Similar

    John Northrop, Junr. 1800 took Freeman's Oath in Newtown

    John Northrop 1804 took Freeman's oaht Newtown.maybe son of Abel

    NORTHROP, John {162}, Methodist preacher b: 01 Apr 1775 Woodbridge, New Haven, CT d: 1835-1836 #: NORT366 son of Joel

    From 1772 to 1777, there is no record of any having been made electors. The years between those dates marked the exciting period that culminated in the war of the Revolution.

    The oath of fidelity to which freemen were obliged to subscribe before they could exercise the rights that accrued to them when they had taken the freeman's oath:

    "You do swear by the ever-living God that you will truly and faithfully adhere to and maintain the government established in this state under the authority of the people, agreeable to the laws in force within the same, and that you believe in your conscience that the King of Great Britain hath not, nor of right ought to have any authority or dominion in or over this state, and that you do not hold yourself bound to yield any allegiance or obedience to him within the same, and that you will, to the unmost of your power, maintain and defend the freedom, inde- pendance and privileges of this state against all open enemies or traitorous conspiracies whatsoever, so help you God. And no person shall have authority to execute any of the offices aforesaid after the first day of January next, until he hath taken said oath, and all persons who hereafter shall be appointed to any of said offices shall take said oath before they enter upon the execution of their offices. And no freemen within this state shall be allowed to vote in the election of any of the officers of government until he hath taken the aforesaid oath in the open freemans' meeting in the town where he dwells."

    "Names of those persons that have appeared to take the oath of fidelity prescribed by the General Assembly of this state at a General Assembly of the State of Connecticut holden at Hartford in said state on the second Thursday of May, A. D.( 1777."

    Zalmon Northrop 1806 freeman

    NEWTOWN POORHOUSE RESIDENTS from the 1850 Census

    Northrop, Zalman  75  M  Conn

    If this is correct DOB is ~1775 instead of 1770

     

     

     

    Fairfield county map is dated 1856 so perhaps infor for a year or so earlier

     

    John Beach, May 5th, 1807, to Abel S. Northrop, land in Trumbull for a consideration of $65.00.

    (For other deeds, see under Lewis B. Beach)

    John Beach of Trumbull made his will, Jan 2nd, 1809, proved March 8th, 1809.

    "... son James
    "... son Lewis
    "... daughter, Eunice Harrison, $16.
    "... grandson, Beach Curtiss 6sh.
    "... three sons, Burton Beach, Silas Beach, and James Beach, $60; to son Lewis,
    one feather [Begin page 16] bed and under bed, one blue bedquilt, also one pair of linen Sheets.

    Stratford Probate Court, V. 359

    Inventory appraised by Lewis B. Beach, ex.

    ... a piece of salt meadow,
    ... a note of hand of Lewis B. Beach $372.78
    " Lewis B. Beach $125.56
    " James Beach, Jr. $164.30
    " James Beach, Jr. $ 33.35
    etc.

     

     

     

     

     

     

                   

    Elijah son of Samuel in records m. Lucina Easton born before 1767

    betsey b. 1801 d/o Elijah and Lucina Easton

    -----------------

     

    Eliza Atwood (prob b ~ 1796) m. Elijah , son of Job had Sarah m. Mr. Cossett. THIS IS A DIFFERENT ELIJAH

    Job 1775-1845 b.Brookfield m. Susan Cady s/o Isaac
    Job 1758-1833 b. Woodbridge m. Chloe Baldwin s/o Job

    ID: I471325

    • Name: Elijah Northrop 1
    • Father: Job Northrop is this the right one?
      Marriage 1 Eliza Atwood b~1796?? d/o Name: Daniel Atwood Birth: 8 JUL 1773 in Woodbury (Litchfield), Connecticut Death: 25 JUL 1839 in Watertown (Litchfield), Connecticut Burial: Old Cemetery, Watertown, Connecticut
      Children Sarah Northrop

    Eliza Atwood's brother Hermon Garry Atwood m. Betsey Northrop d. of widow phebe northrop

    perhaps phebe fairchild widow of Joshua NORTHROP??? Birth: 11 APR 1761 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut 1 Death: 12 DEC 1803 2

    Father: Joshua NORTHROP b: 1722 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    Mother: Mary BENNETT b: 6 JAN 1726/1727 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

    Marriage 1 Phebe FAIRCHILD b: ABT 1764 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut Married: 178 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

    Father: Jeremiah Northrup II (Jeremiah NORTHROP b: 19 JAN 1653/1654, Joseph NORTHROP b: 1623) b: ABT. 1689 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    Mother: Hannah Benedict b: ABT. 1697

    Marriage 1 Mary Bennett b: 1726 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut Married: 22 OCT 1747 2
    Children

    1. Has No Children Mary Northrup b: 19 OCT 1748 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    2. Has No Children Jane Northrup b: 13 JUN 1750 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    3. Has Children Mary Northrup b: 6 MAY 1754 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    4. Has No Children Hannah Northrup b: 30 NOV 1755 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    5. Has No Children Damaris Northrup b: 2 APR 1758 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    6. Has Children Joshua Northrop b: 11 APR 1760 in Newtown, Amity Parish, Connecticut
    7. Has Children Asa Northrop b: 1763 in Brookfield, Fairfield Co., Connecticut

    Lucy of Washington m. Benagah C. Dennie of Dover March 3, 1823

    ? perhaps Benjamin Dennie b: ABT 1804 s/oNicholas Dennie b: 1753 in Claverack, Columbia Co., New York and Anna M. Stoller b: 15 JUL 1765 in Montgomery Co., New York

    Jane married Hial Baldwin, Jr. May 2, 1802

    perhaps Jane NORTHROP b: 1779

    d/o Abel NORTHRUP b: Dec 1739 in Milford, CT and Susanna CAMP b: 1745 in Milford

    Lydia m. Elisha Barlow June 24, 1811 perhaps d/o Samuel 1757 his daughter Lydia Northrup b: ABT. 1795

    Not a remarriage for Elijah's mother, Lydia a different Lydia

    Elisha Barlow Sr is still married (Lydia, Mother of Elijah died Dec 24, 1814 age 91)

    First marriage for Elisha Barlow, Jr.b. 1787 S. Amenia, NY

    OR a son of John BARLOW b: 5 MAR 1748 in Kent, Litchfield, CT and Temperance BRANCH b: 3 MAY 1756 in Kent, Litchfield, CT

    Phebe of Washington m. John Stoddard of Woodbury Sept 11, 1786

    Father Unknown


    Phebe Northrop b: 19 Feb 1766 in Salisbury, , Litchfield, Connecticut OR Birth: ABT 1770 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

    s/o Father: Gideon Stoddard b: 24 Mar 1740 in Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut and Rebecca Hunt John dies Death: 15 Sep 1859 in Peru, , Clinton, New York

    Samuel Northrop Jr. m. June 3 1799 wid Sarah Dutton of Bethlehem

    THIS IS Has Children Samuel Northrup IV (Samuel b: ABT. 1757 in Milford Township, Connecticut samuel later moves to VT but prob some or all children b. CT

    who marries Sarah Frisbie b: ABT. 1755 who was formerly married to Asahel Dutton b: ABT. 1753 he died BEF. JUN 1779

    NOT -Samuel 1687 dies Death: 1748 in Amity (now Woodbridge, New Haven Co.)

    son Samuel appears to be still be married to Lydia Thomas

    MY AMOS could be son of Samuel 1757 but year is way off.

    census search no vt 1790

    census 1800 Samuel Northrop 01010/10110/00 Shoreham, Addison Cnty

    census 1800 Samuel Northrop 10110/11010/00 Middletown, Rutland Cnty

    Samuel in Middletown 1810 does not seem to include Amos

     

     

    William Henry born -- son of Charles , laborer, and Harriet Dec 17, 1849

    ??

     

     

     

    Twenty-one persons have died in this society, either by violent or untimely deaths: of which number, six were drowned ; three were killed with fire-arms; tour were found abroad, dying or dead ; one was killed with a penknife; two children were burnt to death in a coal-pit; and five were murdered.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • ID: I529091528
    • Name: Abigail CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Abigail
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 10 Aug 1728 in New Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    • Death: 13 Jan 1805 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • Change Date: 16 Apr 2003 at 21:45

      Father: Samuel CANFIELD b: Abt 1697 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      Mother: Abigail PECK b: 25 Sep 1701 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut

      Marriage 1 David JUDSON b: 2 Mar 1723 in Woodbury, Litchfield, Connecticut
      • Married: 21 Nov 1753 in New Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      • Change Date: 15 Aug 2003
    • ID: I7987
    • Name: Abigail CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Abigail
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 21 MAR 1762 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 3 MAR 1844 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: Old Ground,Bridgewater 2 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 13:40:26

      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: 20 AUG 1737 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary EVERTON b: ABT 1735

      Marriage 1 Abijah TREAT b: 30 DEC 1761 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 6 MAR 1783 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has Children Joseph Canfield TREAT b: 11 AUG 1783 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has No Children Almon TREAT b: 1 OCT 1785 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Lorana TREAT b: 23 JAN 1789 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      4. Has Children Almon TREAT b: 25 JUL 1795 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Lorana TREAT b: 2 FEB 1798 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8045
    • Name: Alva Treat CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Alva Treat
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 14 JAN 1791 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 17 FEB 1821 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:41:56

      Father: John CANFIELD b: 18 FEB 1760 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Phebe TREAT b: 15 DEC 1763 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8041
    • Name: Amasa CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Amasa
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 16 JAN 1785 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 3 JAN 1861 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:41:23



      Father: John CANFIELD b: 18 FEB 1760 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Phebe TREAT b: 15 DEC 1763 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

      Marriage 1 Nancy RANDALL b: 3 JUL 1785 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 12 SEP 1804 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I7972
    • Name: Ann CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Ann
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1 SEP 1737 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 23 JAN 1770 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2 3
    • Change Date: 17 NOV 2007 at 00:47:24



      Father: Zeruabbabel CANFIELD c: 25 SEP 1709 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary BOSTWICK b: 8 FEB 1714/1715 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I03014
    • Name: Anna Jeanette Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 29 OCT 1807 in Bridgewater, Litchfield Co., CT
    • Death: 10 MAR 1844 in Bridgewater, Litchfield Co., CT



      Marriage 1 Henry Sanford b: 14 OCT 1806 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
      • Married: 4 DEC 1828 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
      Children
      1. Has No Children Canfield H. Sanford b: 28 JUL 1839 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
      2. Has Children Horace Nehemiah Sanford b: 4 JAN 1841 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT
    • ID: I7999
    • Name: Anson CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Anson
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 14 NOV 1786 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 7 DEC 1860 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:54:58



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I1018
    • Name: Azariah CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Azariah
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1692 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Christening: 24 MAR 1694/1695 Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 1769 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Note: RESIDENCE: Settled in New Milford about 1728.

      MARRIAGE: WR Baldwin lists Mercy Bassett. Could be 2nd wife, or widow of
      either a Baldwin or a Bassett. Mercy often short for Mary. Mercy Bassett b.
      1694 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut

      MILITARY: 12 Jun 1779 with Continental Guards (?); Conn. State Library, War,
      7, 31 1 2 3
    • Change Date: 16 NOV 2007 at 23:17:37



      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 28 SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Alice HINE b: 16 DEC 1667 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 21 NOV 1669 in First Congregational,Milford

      Marriage 1 Mercy BASSETT b: 1694 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 24 OCT 1703 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 26 FEB 1719/1720 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has Children Azariah CANFIELD b: 25 NOV 1720 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut c: 22 JUN 1729 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has Children Freelove CANFIELD b: 29 DEC 1726 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has Children Oliver CANFIELD b: 25 DEC 1729 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      4. Has Children Israel CANFIELD b: 13 MAR 1733 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8061
    • Name: Burton CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Burton
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 28 FEB 1778 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 10 JAN 1848 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: South Britain Burying Ground,Southbury 2 3
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 14:08:11



      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743/1744 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 1746

      Marriage 1 Polly MITCHELL b: 1783 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 1 APR 1802 in Southbury,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has No Children Harriet CANFIELD b: 27 DEC 1802 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has No Children Mitchell Monroe CANFIELD b: 29 MAR 1809 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Lemuel Munson CANFIELD b: 19 APR 1820 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8062
    • Name: Charles Augustus CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Charles Augustus
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 24 SEP 1781 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 2 MAY 1782 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 14:12:35



      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743/1744 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 1746
    • ID: I7997
    • Name: Cyrus CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Cyrus
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1778 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 28 MAR 1829 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:54:35



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I81687
    • Name: Daniel CANFIELD
    • Sex: M 1
    • Birth: 29 OCT 1774 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
    • Death: 4 SEP 1853 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
    • _UID: 9654CB9BB1384E3E899EB7C109C0A6845710
    • Change Date: 24 MAR 2008

      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743 in New Milford, Litchfield, CT
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 17 JAN 1757 in Stratford, Fairfield, CT

      Marriage 1 Rebecca WARNER b: 10 DEC 1778 in Roxbury, Litchfield, CT
      • Married: 12 OCT 1803 in Roxbury, Litchfield, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Anna Jennette CANFIELD b: 29 OCT 1807 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
      2. Has Children Egbert Burton CANFIELD b: 22 AUG 1815 in Bridgewater, Litchfield, CT
      3. Has No Children Anna Jeanette CANFIELD b: 1808
    • ID: I12022
    • Name: Elijah Herbert CANFIELD
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Given Name: Elijah Herbert
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1795 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Death: 30 Sep 1824 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Burial: 1824 South Cemetery, Bridgewater, CT
    • _UID: 569E130A3172B94CB30B1DD294B14164503C
    • Note: Listed in the 1790, 1800, 1810 and 1820 Censuses for new Milford, CT.
    • Change Date: 5 Apr 2008 at 01:00:00

      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD III b: 1774 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
      Mother: Polly BENNETT b: 1770 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT

      Marriage 1 Priscilla PECK b: 1791 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Elijah Starr CANFIELD b: 1817 in New Milford, Litchfield County, CT
    • ID: I7989
    • Name: Elizabeth CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Elizabeth
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Nickname: Betsey
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 10 MAR 1769 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 28 AUG 1841 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: New Ground,Bridgewater 2 2 3
    • Change Date: 4 JAN 2008 at 19:39:29

      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: 20 AUG 1737 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary EVERTON b: ABT 1735

      Marriage 1 Peter WOOSTER b: 1762 in Oxford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 16 JAN 1787 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has Children John WOOSTER b: 1790 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has Children Susanna WOOSTER b: ABT 1800

      Marriage 2 John OVIATT b: 7 FEB 1767 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: ABT 1799
    • ID: I7974
    • Name: Enos CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Enos
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 8 FEB 1741/1742 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 10 DEC 1761 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2 3
    • Change Date: 17 NOV 2007 at 00:49:13

      Father: Zeruabbabel CANFIELD c: 25 SEP 1709 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary BOSTWICK b: 8 FEB 1714/1715 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I16084
    • Name: Ira CANFIELD
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1754 in New Milford, Litchfield, CT
    • Death: 9 JUN 1824 in New Milford, Litchfield, CT
    • Burial: Long Mtn., New Milford, Litchfield, CT
    • Note: From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.
    • Change Date: 9 JUL 2001

      Father: David CANFIELD b: 7 Mar 1725/1726 in Milford, Litchfield, CT
      Mother: Mary NORTHRUP b: 24 MAY 1726 in Milford, New Haven, CT

      Marriage 1 Rhoda EDWARDS b: ABT 1767
    • ID: I13270
    • Name: Jeremiah CANFIELD III
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Given Name: Jeremiah
    • Suffix: III
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1774 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Death: 19 Apr 1828 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • Burial: 1828 South Cemetery, Bridgewater, CT
    • _UID: 0AE859E593FC824D85F91D7F3802515A8D3A
    • Note: From an old family of Bridgewater.
      A prominent inhabitant of Bridgewater, CT.
      Member of the Ecclesiastical Society of the local church in 1809.
      Had at least four children. Only Elijah is listed here.
    • Change Date: 5 Apr 2008 at 01:00:00



      Marriage 1 Polly BENNETT b: 1770 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children Elijah Herbert CANFIELD b: 1795 in Bridgewater, Litchfield County, CT
    • ID: I203485
    • Name: Jeremiah Canfield Jr
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Given Name: Jeremiah
    • Suffix: Jr
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: Jun 1688 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • Death: Sep 1756 in Fort Edward (Litchfield,Ct)
    • _UID: 079D8F0BE9FDD243A4599BA653CD865572E1
    • Change Date: 27 Oct 2004 at 01:00:00



      Father: Jeremiah Canfield Sr<<$>> b: 26 Sep 1662 in Milford,New Haven,Ct c: 28 Sep 1662 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Mother: Alice Hine --<<< b: 16 Dec 1667 in Milford,New Haven,Ct c: 21 Nov 1669 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct

      Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
      • Married: 24 Jul 1711 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • D: I7574
    • Name: John CANFIELD
    • Given Name: John
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1766 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1 2
    • Change Date: 22 MAR 2009 at 14:51:58



      Father: David CANFIELD b: 7 MAR 1725/1726 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Mary NORTHROP b: 24 MAY 1726 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I4826
    • Name: John CANFIELD
    • Given Name: John
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: Abt 1740 in Kent, Litchfield County, Connecticut
    • Death: 26 Oct 1786
    • Burial: Kent, Litchfield County, Connecticut
    • _UID: F2D9A98A06F74DBFB5BD863A464B3F939CD8
    • Change Date: 11 Oct 2005 at 23:49



      Father: Samuel CANFIELD b: 4 Jun 1710
      Mother: Mary BARNUM
    • ID: I1025
    • Name: Joseph CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Joseph
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Prefix: Captain
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 1711 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Christening: 1711/1712 Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 25 SEP 1776 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Burial: Center Cemetery,New Milford 2 3
    • Note: MILITARY: Served in French and Indian War 1755, 1758. 2 4
    • Change Date: 16 NOV 2007 at 23:23:24



      Father: Jeremiah CANFIELD b: SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 28 SEP 1662 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Alice HINE b: 16 DEC 1667 in Milford,New Haven Co.,Connecticut c: 21 NOV 1669 in First Congregational,Milford

      Marriage 1 Jerusha BOSTWICK b: 15 JUL 1717 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 15 JAN 1736/1737 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
      Children
      1. Has Children Joseph CANFIELD b: 27 JAN 1737/1738 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      2. Has Children Isaac CANFIELD b: 1 NOV 1740 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Eunice CANFIELD b: 18 JUN 1745 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      4. Has Children Rhoda CANFIELD b: 17 MAR 1747/1748 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8047
    • Name: Laura CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Laura
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 19 JAN 1796 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 29 DEC 1872 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: New Ground,Bridgewater 1 1
    • Change Date: 14 SEP 2007 at 13:03:48



      Father: John CANFIELD b: 18 FEB 1760 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Phebe TREAT b: 15 DEC 1763 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

      Marriage 1 Roswell MORRIS b: 1795 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 26 NOV 1818 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I8063
    • Name: Lemuel CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Lemuel
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Suffix: Jr.
    • Title: Jr.
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 26 MAR 1787 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 15 MAR 1817 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: South Britain Burying Ground,Southbury 2 3
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:52:26



      Father: Lemuel CANFIELD b: 31 JAN 1743/1744 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Sarah BURTON b: 1746

      Marriage 1 Elizabeth MITCHELL b: ABT 1790 in Southbury,New Haven Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 30 AUG 1807
      Children
      1. Has No Children Jerome Mitchell CANFIELD b: 26 MAR 1808 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut

      Marriage 2 Elizabeth S. HINMAN b: 1792
      • Married: 1814
    • ID: I7992
    • Name: Lucinda CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Lucinda
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 7 AUG 1768 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Death: 8 JUN 1813 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 2
    • Change Date: 12 OCT 2006 at 16:56:49



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I25484
    • Name: Mary CANFIELD 1
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1746 1
    • Death: 23 JAN 1751 in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 27 AUG 2002



      Father: David CANFIELD b: 7 MAR 1725 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      Mother: Mary NORTHRUP b: 24 JAN 1725 in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • ID: I8000
    • Name: Orlando CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Orlando
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: ABT 1788 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 15 NOV 1813 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:55:13



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I68971
    • Name: Polly CANFIELD
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: ABT 1776 1
    • Death: 12 DEC 1797 in Woodbury, Litchfield County, CT 1
    • _UID: 57227863A5AAB34F9D84F8421FD86193EBCB
    • Note: Died 12 December 1797, aged 21.
    • Change Date: 21 JUL 2005 at 21:00:00



      Father: Thomas CANFIELD

      Marriage 1 Ira SANFORD b: 10 OCT 1774 in Plymouth, New Haven County, CT
      • Married: 25 JUL 1797 1 1
    • D: I8001
    • Name: Samuel CANFIELD
    • Given Name: Samuel
    • Surname: Canfield
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 2 JAN 1792 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 28 SEP 1840 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut 1
    • Change Date: 11 SEP 2006 at 23:55:25



      Father: Nathan CANFIELD b: 28 JUL 1739 in Bridgewater,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      Mother: Lois HARD b: 12 MAY 1748 in Newtown,Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

     

    • ID: I11136
    • Name: Sarah CANFIELD 1
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 13 MAY 1794
    • Death: 11 MAY 1865 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut



      Father: Nathaniel CANFIELD
      Mother: Mary FERRY

      Marriage 1 Samuel NETTLETON b: 13 DEC 1791 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut
      • Married: 31 DEC 1816 in Roxbury, Litchfield, Connecticut

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    18th Century History - Cheshire Academy is Founded
    From 1770 – 1780, the Episcopal religion was floundering in the colonies. Believing that the religion would be better received if there were an American bishop, a delegation sent Samuel Seabury to England. When he returned as the first Episcopal Bishop of America, one of his first duties was to start a school to educate future clergy. Cheshire was chosen as the site and in 1794 the Episcopal Academy of Connecticut opened its doors.
    Close
    The first headmaster, Rev. John Bowden, taught classes in a small building in town until the completion of a new school building. Bowden Hall was erected in 1796 as an “all Cheshire project,” since only one third of the donors belonged to the church. The original charter was quite liberal, providing for the education of both genders and the freedom for students to practice the religion of their family’s choice. In 1836, a new constitution designated the school as exclusively for boys, a system that didn’t change until 1969.

    19th Century History - Cheshire Academy Evolves
    The school taught classical studies and entered a period of stability. An interesting fact is that even though the school was officially The Episcopal Academy, by the early 1800s, parents and boys addressed letters to The Cheshire Academy. This was seen in letters of graduate Samuel Welles to his son Gideon Welles (letter 1, letter 2), who would later become Secretary of the Navy under Lincoln.
    Read More

     

     

    • ID: I406059
    • Name: MARY KEELER NORTHROP
    • Surname: NORTHROP
    • Given Name: MARY KEELER
    • Sex: F
    • _UID: 427C61302D5A6E4A9035B70C51BB1EFD3D29
    • Change Date: 20 May 2005 at 06:27:27



      Marriage 1 SAMUEL CAMP b: 7 Dec 1744 in EAST HAVEN, NEW HAVEN, CT
      • Married: 17 Oct 1782 in RIDGEFIELD, FAIRFIELD, CT
      Children
      1. Has Children MARY CAMP b: 10 Jun 1773 in SALISBURY, LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT

    no listing for parents

     

    died in Kent, CT

    • D: I62163
    • Name: Anne NORTHRUP
    • Sex: F
    • Change Date: 9 AUG 2007
    • Birth: Abt 1735 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut 1
    • Death: 23 APR 1803 1
    • Baptism: 05 OCT 1735 First Congregational Church, Milford, New Haven, Connecticut 1

      Father: Josiah NORTHRUP b: Abt 1699
      Mother: Mary SANFORD b: 05 JUL 1702

      Marriage 1 Jonah CAMP b: Abt 1727 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      • Married: 2
      Children
      1. Has Children John CAMP b: 23 DEC 1761 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
      2. Has Children Chauncey CAMP b: 12 APR 1762 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Gould CAMP b: 04 JUL 1765 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      4. Has No Children Jonah CAMP b: 16 AUG 1765 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Abiel CAMP b: 10 JUL 1771 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
      6. Has No Children Sarah Ann CAMP b: 13 JUL 1776 in Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • ID: I63779
    • Name: Josiah NORTHRUP
    • Sex: M
    • Change Date: 9 AUG 2007
    • Birth: Abt 1699 1

      Marriage 1 Mary SANFORD b: 05 JUL 1702
      • Married: 1
      Children
      1. Has Children Anne NORTHRUP b: Abt 1735 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut

      Sources:
      1. Author: David Payne-Joyce
        Title: Payne-Joyce Genealogy
        Abbrev: Payne-Joyce Genealogy
        Publication: http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/

     

    Died Washington, CT

    • ID: I145046
    • Name: Elizabeth NORTHRUP
    • Given Name: Elizabeth
    • Surname: Northrup
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 17 JAN 1733 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • Death: 8 JUN 1809 in Washington,Litchfield,Ct
    • Change Date: 8 APR 2005 at 01:00:00

      Father: Phineas NORTHRUP c: 16 JAN 1694/1695 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Mother: Elizabeth BRINSMADE

      Marriage 1 Enos BALDWIN b: 1730 in Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Children
      1. Has Children Samuel BALDWIN b: 3 MAR 1769 in Washington,Litchfield,Ct

    SISTER

    • ID: I149101
    • Name: Ann NORTHRUP
    • Given Name: Ann
    • Surname: Northrup
    • Sex: F
    • Christening: 27 MAR 1737 Milford,New Haven,Ct
    • Death: 18 JAN 1777
    • Change Date: 28 JUN 2003 at 01:00:00

      Father: Phineas NORTHRUP c: 16 JAN 1694/1695 in First Church,Milford,New Haven,Ct
      Mother: Elizabeth BRINSMADE

      Marriage 1 Benjamin BEERS b: 23 APR 1736 in Milford Twp,Litchfield,Ct
      Children
      1. Has Children Phebe BEERS
      2. Has Children John BEERS b: 1766 in Milford,New Haven,Ct

    ANOTHER SISTER

    • ID: I81764
    • Name: Phebe NORTHRUP
    • Sex: F 1
    • Birth: 6 APR 1735
    • Death: 4 SEP 1822 in Washington, Litchfield, CT
    • _UID: F1098F9B3E3F4AE78FF1B4F0017BA7D3EC75
    • Change Date: 11 MAR 2008

      Father: Phineas NORTHRUP b: 1707
      Mother: Elizabeth BRINSMADE b: MAR 1709

      Marriage 1 Samuel GUNN b: 1740 in Milford, New Haven, CT
      • Married:
      Children
      1. Has No Children John Northrup GUNN b: 18 JUN 1772 in Milford, New Haven, CT

    -----

    • ID: I645
    • Name: Samuel Northrup 1 2 3 4 5 6
    • Sex: M 7
    • Birth: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT 8 9 10 3 11 5 6
    • Death: BEF 1787 in Washington, CT 12
    • Note: 12 He lived in Washington, CT and his estate was settled in 1787.
    • Change Date: 16 JUN 2005

      Father: Samuel Northrup b: 5 JUN 1687 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      Mother: Sarah Andrews b: 30 SEP 1688 in Waterbury, New Haven Co., CT

      Marriage 1 Lydia Thomas b: ABT 1722 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      • Married: 10 JUN 1746 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., CT 13 14 15 16 17
      Children
      1. Has No Children Lydia Northrup b: 22 OCT 1747 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      2. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 1 APR 1749 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      3. Has Children Samuel Northrup b: 18 OCT 1755 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      4. Has No Children Enoch Northrup b: ABT 1757 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      5. Has No Children Elijah Northrup b: ABT 1759 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT
      6. Has No Children Phoebe Northrup b: ABT 1761 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT

    ------

    • ID: I8602
    • Name: Harriet NORTHROP
    • Given Name: Harriet
    • Surname: Northrop
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1809 in New Milford,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Death: 22 MAR 1861 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • Burial: Northville Cem,New Milford

      Marriage 1 Seymour MOREHOUSE b: 24 JAN 1798 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      • Married: 7 SEP 1828
      Children
      1. Has No Children Artemitia MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1829
      2. Has No Children Noble MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1831
      3. Has No Children Harriet MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1833
      4. Has No Children Polly MOREHOUSE b: 1834 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Henry S. MOREHOUSE b: ABT 1835
      6. Has No Children Eliza MOREHOUSE b: 1838 in Washington,Litchfield Co.,Connecticut
    • ID: I5667
    • Name: Hattie Chloe Northrop 1 2
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 5 JUN 1858 in OH 3 2
    • Census: 1870 Medina, Medina Co., OH 4
    • Death: 4 MAY 1901 in Washington, Litchfield Co., CT 2
    • Cause: heart attack 2
    • Note: 2 Hattie was grand-daughter of Nira Northrup. Hattie died on the Washington Green on 5-4-1901 of a heart attack in her horse carriage. She went to the drug store on Washington green to get medicine. She got into the buggy and suffered a heart attack. The horse continued on the the Depot and that is where they found her dead. She was 43. Hattie & John Burr met on campus in Storrs CT. They moved to Ohio, had their sons there and then migrated back to CT before 1886.
    • Change Date: 9 AUG 2004

      Father: Dwight Benjamin Northrop b: ABT 1825 in Medina Co., OH
      Mother: Delia Briggs b: ABT 1825 in OH

      Marriage 1 John Burr Hollister b: 28 JAN 1856 in Torrington, CT
      • Married: 22 SEP 1878 in Medina, Medina Co., OH 2
      Children
      1. Has Children Pearl Delia Hollister b: 3 SEP 1879 in Medina, Medina Co., OH
      2. Has Children George Hubert Hollister b: 14 APR 1882 in Medina, Medina Co., OH
      3. Has Children Sherman Preston Hollister b: 11 FEB 1884 in Medina, Medina Co., OH
      4. Has Children Wesley Oviatt Hollister b: 24 APR 1886 in Washington, Litchfield Co., CT

    CHECK FURTHER

    -----------

    • ID: I35492
    • Name: Jane NORTHROP
    • Surname: Northrop
    • Given Name: Jane
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 4 Jul 1779 in Milford,New Haven,Connecticut,USA
    • Death: BEF 1804 in Washington,Litchfield,Connecticut,USA
    • LDS Baptism: status: DONE
    • Endowment: status: DONE
    • _UID: CED5E2E06BE6CE47B6F5DC1F9CB77B9FDED8
    • Sealing Child: status: DONE
    • Change Date: 11 Aug 2003 at 06:04:45

      Marriage 1 Jehiel BALDWIN b: 9 May 1780 in Milford,New Haven,Connecticut,USA
      • Married: 2 May 1802 in Milford,New Haven,Connecticut,USA
      • Sealing Spouse: 26 Aug 2000 in JRIVE
      Children
      1. Has No Children Jane BALDWIN b: 15 Sep 1802 in Washington,Litchfield,Connecticut,USA

    ---------

    • ID: I212
    • _UPD: 19 MAR 2009 22:37:55 GMT-6
    • Name: Gershom Fenn
    • Given Name: Gershom
    • Surname: Fenn
    • Sex: M
    • Birth:
    • _UID: 8228F253-82D3-4A1E-A7E0-C71D82839DF4
    • RIN: MH:IF3898 12 JAN 1771
    • Death:
    • _UID: A2BF1076-A440-4002-BFCD-CFB0E52F75FC
    • RIN: MH:IF3899 14 JUN 1852 in Washington, Litchfield County, Connecticut USA
    • RIN: MH:I252
    • _UID: ADAE80B5-6983-466A-8EA5-BD16726A5B53
    • Event: Smart Matching
    • ROLE: 1000621 1

      Father: Joseph Fenn b: 14 SEP 1745
      Mother: Esther Brown b: 17 AUG 1751 in New Hampshire, USA

      Sources:
      1. Author: laura sales
        Title: schenkel Web Site
        Text: MyHeritage.com family tree
        Family site: schenkel Web Site
        Family tree: schenkel Family Tree
        Page: Gershom Fenn
        Date: 19 MAR 2009
        Text: Added by confirming a Smart Match
        Quality: 3

     

    Died Litchfield

    • ID: I30847
    • Name: Aaron Fenn
    • Surname: Fenn
    • Given Name: Aaron
    • Sex: M
    • Birth: 20 Nov 1746 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    • Death: 30 Jun 1821 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
    • _UID: B35C63A39AEDD6119804AF31BE9FBE4B6528
    • Change Date: 7 May 2002 at 06:12:49

      Father: James Fenn
      Mother: Sarah Buckingham

      Marriage 1 Mary Bradley b: 5 Aug 1750 in of New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut
      • Married: 15 Mar 1770 in Woodbridge, New Haven, Connecticut
      Children
      1. Has No Children Sally Fenn b: 9 Dec 1771 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      2. Has Children Aaron Fenn b: 20 Dec 1772 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      3. Has Children Mary Fenn b: 5 Oct 1779 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      4. Has No Children Erastus Fenn b: 29 Dec 1781 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      5. Has No Children Polly Fenn b: 13 Aug 1785 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      6. Has No Children David Fenn b: 12 Nov 1787 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut
      7. Has No Children Jeremiah Fenn b: ABT 1789 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut

    ----

  • ID: I125884
  • Name: Hannah ?KEELER
  • Given Name: Hannah
  • Surname: ?Keeler
  • Sex: F
  • _UID: 3E0537E718666A498E1EC8C345FE126F8D81
  • Change Date: 22 Apr 2006
  • Note: Hannah ?Keeler may have been married to Elijah Hickox prior to marrying Samuel Fenn.
  • Birth: 23 DEC 1757 1
  • Death: Y

    Marriage 1 Samuel FENN b: 27 SEP 1746
    • Married: 13 NOV 1803 1

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: The American Genealogist (TAG)
      Title: The American Genealogist; a continuation of the New Haven Genealogical Magazine (New Haven, CT, Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Co., 1932 on)
      Page: 24:131 (1948)
  • OAS_AD('BottomRight');
    var s_pageName="WC Individual Record Page - //wc/igm.cgi/GET";

     

    • ID: P3302520508
    • Name: Samuel Fenn
    • Birth: 27 Sep 1746 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
    • Death: Feb 1827 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
    • Sex: M 1

      Father: Benjamin Fenn V b: 17 Apr 1720 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      Mother: Mary Peck b: 30 Jul 1718 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

      Marriage 1 Hannah Hickox b: 23 Dec 1857 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      • Married: 13 Nov 1803 in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      Children
      1. Has No Children Mary Fenn b: 1770 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      2. Has No Children Elizabeth Ann Fenn b: 14 Sep 1773 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      3. Has No Children Samuel Fenn b: 1774 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      4. Has No Children Polly Fenn b: 1776 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      5. Has No Children Benjamin Fenn b: 18 Mar 1778 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      6. Has No Children Lucinda Fenn b: 4 Aug 1780 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      7. Has No Children Sally Fenn b: 23 Aug 1784 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      8. Has No Children Cornelia Fenn b: 22 Jul 1787 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

      Marriage 2 Elizabeth Baldwin b: 2 Jul 1750 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      • Married: 1765 in , , Connecticut, USA
      Children
      1. Has No Children Mary Fenn b: 1770 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      2. Has No Children Elizabeth Ann Fenn b: 14 Sep 1773 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      3. Has No Children Samuel Fenn b: 1774 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      4. Has No Children Polly Fenn b: 1776 in Plymouth, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
      5. Has No Children Benjamin Fenn b: 18 Mar 1778 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      6. Has No Children Lucinda Fenn b: 4 Aug 1780 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      7. Has No Children Sally Fenn b: 23 Aug 1784 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
      8. Has No Children Cornelia Fenn b: 22 Jul 1787 in Orange, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

     

     

     

     

     

    http://www.ci.bethlehem.ct.us/OBHSI/oldcemetery.htm

    Places checked

    nEWTOWN POOTATUCK
    LITCHFIELD BANTAM, Bantam Falls, Bradleyville
    KENT SCATACOOK
    BETHEL FM DANBURY  
    WOODBURY POMPERAUG
    STRATFORD CUPHEAG
    MILFORD WEPAWAUG
    TRUMBULL, NORTH STRATFORD  
    WESTON NORTHFIELD
    Morris checked South Farms?
    Brookfield/
    Newbury checked

     

    Bridgewater checked  
    Bethlehem
    checked FROM WOODBURY
     
    Brookfield Newbury

    Seymour
    checked

    Humphreysville
    checked

    petition requested that the town be named "Richmond.

    Chuse-town.

    The name given to Seymour when it was the camping-ground of Joe Chuse
    (Joseph Mainveelm) and his band, and by which the place was known until it became Humphreysville.

    Derby checked (Seymour - Humphreysville was earlier part of Derby)

    Birmingham, CT checked part of Derby name used through at least 1880

     


     


    Derby was to become the first inland settlement on the Naugatuck River.

    Dr. Daniel W. Northrup was the fourth homœopath in the state, having begun practice at Sherman, Fairfield county, in 1843. Dr. Daniel Holt, another pioneer in New Haven, was born at Hampton, July 2, 1810. He was educated at Ashford and Amherst academies and in 1831 entered the scientific department of Yale.

    Ripton northern portion of Stratford -- now Huntington Shelton, Monroe
    Bromica, Bull's Bridge, Ore Hill, Schaghticoke, Flanders, Flat Rocks, Geer Mountain, Good Hill, Treasure Hill, kent

    Washington JUDEDA & NEW PRESTON

    checked

    Marbledale checked

    Nettleton hollow

    New Preston Hills

    New Preston/Marbledale-washington depot
    Blackville-washington
    Calhoun Street - washington
    Church Hill - washington
    Romford-washington
    Washington Green

    Marbledale Checked,
    New Preston, checked
    Woodville, checked Washington Depot Parish of New Preston belonged to New Milford became Washington 1779

    prob part of New Milford North Purchase
    In 1746, William Cogswell's father, Edward, secured the right to mine iron ore in the New Milford North Purchase.

    The Iron Works was established along the Aspetuck River, near the foot of the road leading to New Preston hill. The Iron Works was the first industry in the North Purchase.

    During the first half of the 19th century, a variety of new industries began to spring up and flourish in the town of Washington. A coopers' shop prospered in Marbledale, while grist, cider, flax and saw mills churned.

    Factories producing everything from twine, hats and cheese boxes to ax handles, shoes and harnesses were able to thrive in the growing community.

    Turnpikes were built to connect Washington to neighboring communities, and by 1872 the area's first railroad -- The Shepaug Railroad -- was expanding the small town's reach. (The Shepaug Railroad ran a freight line until 1948.)

    Washington Green. This section of town encompasses "Judea," Joseph Hurlbut's original parish on the land that would later become the town of Washington.

     

    Watertown checked PLYMOUTH FROM WATERTOWN WESTBURY
    CHESHIRE WEST FARMS ON MILL RIVER
    DERBY PAUGUSSET
    greenfield checked  
    woodbury checked POMPERAUG
    southbury SOUTH PART OF WOODBURY

    The town of Southbury was one of several towns formed out of a parcel of land purchased from the Paugussett Indians in 1659. It was originally part of Woodbury, which was settled in 1673. A new meetinghouse for the Southbury Ecclesiastical Society was built in 1733, and in 1787 the town of Southbury was incorporated.[1] Although incorporated as part of Litchfield County, Southbury has been in New Haven county for most of its existence.[2]

    In the 1800s, water power became essential to the growth of Southbury's industries, which included mills, tanneries, and distilleries.[3] The water power came primarily from the Pomperaug[4] and Housatonic rivers. As the industrial revolution progressed, many of these businesses left for Waterbury.

    south britain  
    northville parts of kent warren washington much of it formerly the "North End of New Milford" including marbledale, new preston
    Kent Hollow  

    No proof, but I'm sure this is a connection to Amos -- can't be sister

    2336. Elihu Ives (Lydia Augur , Abraham Augur , Elizabeth Bradley , Isaac Bradley , William , Danyell ) was born on 8 Oct 1777 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died on 2 Oct 1849 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    Elihu married (1) Mary Northrop on 16 Mar 1802 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Mary was born about 1780. She died before 1804 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    Elihu married (2) Lucy Whittimore on 29 Jul 1804 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Lucy was born on 6 Mar 1781 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 3 Feb 1848 in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. She was buried in Grove Street Cem., New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

    They had the following children:

      4012 F i Mary Whittimore Ives was born on 2 Jul 1805 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 17 Sep 1806 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
      4013 F ii Mary Northrop Ives was born on 4 Sep 1806 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 4 Jan 1881 in Montgomery, alabama, USA.
      4014 M iii William Augustus Ives was born on 26 Dec 1809 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died on 16 Jul 1885 in Rubicon, Wisconsin, USA.
            William married Elizabeth M. Pardee daughter of Isaac Holt Pardee and Sarah Hotchkiss on 22 Mar 1842 in East Haven, Connecticut, USA. Elizabeth was born on 24 Feb 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 19 Oct 1907.
      4015 F iv Jane Catherine Ives was born on 21 Oct 1812 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died after 1850 in (prob.) Columbus, Georgia, USA.
            Jane married Henry Hall. Henry was born about 1808 in Columbus, Georgia, USA.
      4016 F v Sophia Ives was born on 2 Sep 1814 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died after 1850 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA.
      4017 F vi Anne Vose Ives was born on 1 Dec 1816 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 14 Sep 1838.
      4018 M vii Elihu Lafayette Ives was born on 7 Oct 1818 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died on 27 Nov 1872.
            Elihu married (1) Grace Ann Lego on 1 Jun 1843 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Grace was born on 25 May 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 8 Apr 1844 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
            Elihu married (2) Sarah R. Bray on 19 May 1847 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Sarah was born on 16 Mar 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. She died on 8 Jan 1870 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
      4019 F viii Lucy Whittimore Ives was born on 13 May 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
      4020 M ix George Washinton Ives was born on 11 May 1822 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. He died after 1850 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA.
      4021 F x Lydia Augur Ives was born on 12 Apr 1824 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
            Lydia married Abraham C. Thompson on 5 Sep 1844 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Abraham was born about 1820 in New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

     

    SAMUEL Northrop in Washington CT 1799

  • ID: I1122
  • Name: Sarah FRISBIE 1 2 3
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: 1756
  • Christening: 1756 Branford, CT
  • Death: 24 FEB 1840 in Cass co., MI
  • Note: In 1827 she signed a document transferring all of her assets to her son, Amos Frisbie Northrop, in exchange for him agreeing to support her the rest of her life. In 1838 she moved with him from Middleton, VT to Cass county, MI.
  • Change Date: 19 JUL 1999



    Father: Amos FRISBIE b: 17 FEB 1729 in Branford, CT
    Mother: Mary LUDDINGTON

    Marriage 1 Asahel DUTTON b: 2 FEB 1753 in Wallingford, New Haven, Cn c: 4 FEB 1756
    • Married: 3 NOV 1772 in Woodbury, CT
    Children
    1. Has Children Asahel E. DUTTON b: ABT 1774 in CT
    2. Has No Children Elias DUTTON b: ABT 1775

    Marriage 2 Samuel NORTHROP b: 18 OCT 1755 in Milford, CT
    • Married: 3 JUN 1779 in Washington, CT of Washington when he was married
    Children
    1. Has No Children Amos Frisbie NORTHROP b: 4 JAN 1799 in Middleton, Rutland, VT

    Sources:
    1. Text: The evidence that Asahel Dutton and Sarah Frisbie were the parents of Asahel E. Dutton is circumstantial, but highly pursuasive:
      1.Asahel and Sarah's birth dates and marriage date are appropriate for them being the parents of the younger Asahel.
      2. The fact that both men had the same name is an obvious clue.
      3. The younger Asahel named one of his sons James Frisbie Dutton. James Frisbie was the name of one of Sarah's brothers.
      4. James Frisbie shared a claim to land in Bradford county, Pennsylvania with Solomon Moss, who was the father-in-law of the younger Asahel Dutton.
      5. The families of both the suspected parents and Asahel E. Dutton all moved to Poultney, VT. Sarah Frisbie and 4 of her brothers moved to the Poultney area when the younger Asahel was a young child. Further, the sister of the elder Asahel, Lois Dutton, moved to Poultney. The first docuement event involving the younger Asahel was his moving from Poultney in 1800.
    2. Text: Edward Frisbie of Branford and His Descendants, by Nora G. Frisbie. Published 1984 by Gateway Press, Inc.
    3. Text: Families of Ancient New Haven, compiled by Donald Lines Jacobus, published by Clarence D. Smith, Rome, NY, 1923
  • ---------------------------------IS THIS AMOS' FATHER OR UNCLE??
    Father:
    Samuel Northrup III b: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut Mother: Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    This Samuel is Gideon's brother Mother was ~37 when Gideon born

    Is this his only marriage? waited til age 27?
    ID: I03791 Name: Samuel Northrup III 1 2 3 4 5 Sex: M ALIA: Samuel * /Northrop/ Birth: 9 JUN 1718 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut 2 Death: BEF. 1787 Will: 1787 Samuel's estate settled. He spelled his name "Samuel Northrop" in his will. 2 ADDR: Washington Connecticut U. S. A.

    Father: Samuel Northrup , Jr. b: ABT. JUN 1687 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    Mother: Sarah Andrews b: ABT. SEP 1688
    Marriage 1 Lydia Thomas b: ABT. 1723 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut Married: 10 JUN 1746 in New Milford, Litchfield Co., Connecticut 2Children

    1. Has No Children Lydia Northrup b: 22 OCT 1747 in Washington Co., Connecticut Will: Probably died young as she was not mentioned in her father, Samuel's, will.
    2. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 1 APR 1749 Death: 25 APR 1749 in Died in infancy 2
    3. Has No Children Phoebe Northrup b: ABT. 1751 in Washington Co., Connecticut Marriage 1 John Stoddard b: ABT. 1749
    4. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: ABT. 1753 Death: UNKNOWN in Died young _NAMS: Named for a sibling that died earlier
    5. Has No Children Samuel Northrup b: 18 OCT 1755 in Washington Co., Connecticut Death: UNKNOWN _NAMS: Named for sibling who died earlier
    6. Has Children Samuel Northrup IV b: ABT. 1757 in Milford Township, Connecticut Marriage 1 Sarah Frisbie b: ABT. 1755 Married: 3 JUN 1779
    7. Has Children Enoch Northrup b: ABT. 1759 in Washington Co., Connecticut Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown
    8. Has Children Elijah Northrup b: ABT. 1761 in Washington Co., Connecticut ID: I08200 Name: Elijah Northrup 1 2 3 Sex: M Birth: ABT. 1761 in Washington Co., Connecticut 2 Death: 1829 in Humphreysville, Connecticut Military Service: Served (American Revolutionary War) Event: Pension Awarded a pension (#s36199)Marriage 1 Lucina Easton b: ABT. 1764 Married: 1785

      Children

      1. Has Children Ebenezer Northrup , Sr. b: 1786 (maybe Washington) Death: 11 JAN 1835 2 Residence: Seymour, New Haven Co., Connecticut Marriage 1 Mercy Northrup b: 25 APR 1791 in Milford, New Haven Co.,(d/o Heth Mercy's siblings Has Children Newton Northrup b: 26 MAY 1781 in Milford, Elizabeth Ann Northrup b: 7 MAY 1783 in Milford, Has Children Ephraim Northrup b: 15 NOV 1786 in Milford, Has Children Abner Northrup b: 28 JUL 1788 in New Haven, Has Children Mercy Northrup b: 25 APR 1791 in Milford,Has No Children Wheeler Northrup b: 7 OCT 1793 in Milford, Has Children Luther Northrup b: 17 AUG 1796 in Milford,Has Children Andrew Northrup b: 12 JAN 1800 in Milford, )
      2. Connecticut Married: ABT. 1812 2
        Children
      1. Has No Children John Northrup b: ABT. 1814
      2. Has No Children Elizabeth Ann Northrup b: ABT. 1816
      3. Has No Children Daniel Northrup b: ABT. 1818
      4. Has No Children Ebenezer Northrup , Jr. b: ABT. 1820
      5. Has No Children Betsey Emeline Northrup b: ABT. 1822

      Althea Northrup b: 1789ID: I45913 Name: Althea Northrup 1 Sex: F Birth: 1789 Death: UNKNOWN

      Harvey Northrup b: 1796 ID: I42966 Name: Harvey Northrup 1 Sex: M Birth: 1796 Death: UNKNOWN
      Lucinda Northrup b: 1799 ID: I44836 Name: Lucinda Northrup 1 Sex: F Birth: 1799 Death: UNKNOWN
      Betsey Northrup b: 1801 ID: I44833 Name: Betsey Northrup 1 Sex: F Birth: 1801 Death: UNKNOWN Marriage 1 William Steele b: ABT. 1799

    both from Connecticut historical collections By John Warner Barber

     
    Perhaps something more than Ethan Allen’s personal charism made the Brownsons especially responsive to his influence. Allen had joined the Brownson family back in Connecticut; he had married Mary, the daughter of Cornelius Brownson, on June 23, 1762, in Judea parish, Woodbury. The wedding ceremony cost him four shillings. (9)

    Between the years 1806 and 18 16 several boys had drifted away from the Sandwich Islands as seamen and became tempo- rarily residents of New England ; some of them had begun to ac- quire an education by private assistance and a few, in 18 16, were gathered into a flourishing school at Morris, Conn. Henry Obookiah, one of the most influential, had joined the church in Torringford the previous 3'ear, and was preparing to be a mission ary to his native land under the direction of the Litchfield North
    Consociation.

    hist records of the town of cornwall

    Life and letters of Horace Bushnell"

    Tracing the family lineage of the Bushnells, we find them among the first settlers of Guilford and later of Saybrook,. Conn. We learn of no titled or distinguished persons among them. Whether Francis Bushnell, " ye elder," signer of the covenant for the settlement of Guilford, made on ship-board
    by the colonists in June, 1639, was or was not the father of the three original Saybrook Bushnells remains a moot point among genealogists, but there was undoubtedly a relationship between them. Deacon Francis Bushnell, Lieutenant Will iam Bushnell and Kichard Bushnell, all of Saybrook, were brothers, and from them the Connecticut Bushnells are de scended. Fifth in the line of descent from Lieutenant Will iam was Abraham Bushnell, \vho married Molly Ensign of West Hartford and Salisbury, lived many years at Canaan Falls, Conn., and finally removed to Starksboro, Vermont. They had thirteen children, the second of whom was Ensign, the father of Horace Bushnell.^

    * For genealogy see note p. 569 et seq.

     

    EARLY LIFE AT HOME.

    In 1805, Eiisign Buslmell removed his family to New Preston, a village about fifteen miles distant from Litchfield, and in the most picturesque part of the same county. There is reason to think that the inducement to this removal lay in the superior water-power of New Preston, and that an interest in carding wool and dressing cloth by machinery had come to Ensign Bushnell from his father at Canaan Falls, where was erected in 1802 the first carding machine ever built in the State. At all events this, in addition to farming, soon became his business.

    The scenery of New Preston abounds in lovely pictures of which Lake Wararnaug is the centre. Its outline is irregular, the shores hilly and on the east even mountainous and densely wooded. From the base of a mountain on the eastern side, known as the Pinnacle, the lake turns westward with a wider sweep, its banks indented with little coves and crowned with
    green farms, which are freshened here and there by sparkling brooks. Boiling hills fill the western distance. The scene is one of purely New England character, full of fresh suggestion and rural charm untamed by culture. The outlet is from
    the southern end, and pours its foaming stream through a narrow valley, from which the hills on either side rise steep ly. The little mills and shops which line this stream and use its water-power, and the rugged farms that climb these hill sides, compose the village of New Preston, which still, nes tled in the safe seclusion of woods and mountains, keeps much of its old character of remoteness from the world.

    The Bushnells chose their farm and fixed their home upon the southeastern slope of " a broad-backed hill, which stretches a mile upward and westward to a rounded summit, where stands the church." As this hill turns its back upon the lake, the view does not include the water, but is a wide outlook down the winding valley and across the rolling summits of the hills which, for ten miles, part it from that of the Housatonic. The farm lying on this sunny slope is a rough and rocky one one to tax the strength and patient skill of him who tilled it. " No ornamental rock-work is needed to set off the landscape. Nature s rock-work will stand, and the toil that is necessary to clear the soil is just what is requisite to sharpen the vigor of our people. The necessities of a rough country and an intractable soil are good necessities."
    This was the lesson of early experience as recalled by Horace Bushnell in manhood. the New Preston Academy was opened, in 1818

    Reports of cases adjudged in the Superior court of the state of ... - Google Books Result

    by Connecticut. Superior Court, Ephraim Kirby ... - 1898 - Law reports, digests, etc - 485 pages
    Adjudged insufficient for uncertainty. Society of South Farms v. ... the omission could only be pleaded in abatement. Northrop v. Brush, 108. ...
    books.google.com/books?id=uLEaAAAAYAAJ... -

    assault on northrop w pistols

     

    Litciifield, the shire town of the county, is 58 miles from Hartford, by rail, and has a population of about 3,000. The township is on high land, with strong soil. Bantam Lake, tire largest body of water in the county, is situated partly in this town. The village commands a beautiful and extensive prospect, and has a fine park in the centre, in which stands a monument to commemorate the lives of those who fell in the late war. The prominent buildings are the old court-house, with its turret and bell; the jail, and a new Congregational church edifice costing about $30,000. With its beautiful shade-trees, the village, at present, is a most delightful resort for those in quest of pleasure and recreation. The Lake-view House, capable of accommodating several hundred people, is a sightly place, and a favorite resort for metropolitan guests during the heated term. The city of New York, distant about 115 miles by rail, is reached by the Norwalk, Ilousatonic, Shepaug and Naugatuck railroads. The churches in the town are six

    in number; and there are two banks, one newspaper, and 20 public schools. Manufacturing is carried on to a greater or less extent at East Litchfield, Bantam Falls, Milton and Northfield.

    Among the eminent men of Litchfield have been Oliver Woleott (172C-97), the commander of a company in the French war, first sheriff of the county, delegate to Congress in 1775, and signer of the Declaration of Independence, and governor of the State at the time of his death; Benjamin Tallmadge (1754—1835), a colonel in the Revolutionary war, serving with distinction in many battles, several times a representative in Congress, and instrumental in causing the capture of Maj. Andre; Gen. Uriah Tracy (1755-1807), congressman and U. S. senator; Hon. O. S. Seymour, LL. D., former member of Congress and chief justice of the State; George C. Woodruff, formerly a member of Congress; Gideon H. Hollister, author of a standard history of Connecticut; Rev. Henry Ward Beecher; and Gov. Chas. B. Andrews.

    A history of New England - Google Books Result

    edited by R. H. Howard, Henry E. Crocker - 1879 - History
    The prominent buildings are the old court-house, with its turret and bell ... or less extent at East Litchfield, Bantam Falls, Milton and Northfield. ...
    books.google.com/books?id=8sRWAAAAMAAJ... -

     

     

    Northrup St
    Bridgewater, CT 06752


    maps.google.com

     

     

    Robert Alan Kraft's Genealogy Page

    C.S.Miller Journals
    John Northrop
    painted on shop. 08\03\{1887}(We) Spenser Monroe act 7.07 for July, for June 7.34, for. May 5.48. 08\04\{1887}(Th) Doctor came. ...... Connecticut's number to be sent is 1286 men. This morning ...... Shepanhg River 8 miles, then to Woodville ...... 7th 1778 to May{Mgg!} 25 1779, a fin_{fins?} monument ...
    ccat.sas.upenn.edu/rs/rak/gen/miller/journals.htm - Similar pages

    (VI) James Chamberlain, son of Rufus Cleveland, was born January 9, 1787, in East Windsor, Connecticut; died in Winsted, September i, 1875, aged eighty-eight. He married (first) in Winchester, Connecticut, February 3. 1813, Philenda, born in Winchester, August 29, 1793, died in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, May 19, 1814, daughter of Lewis and Mary (Allen) Miller. He married (second) in Hartland, Connecticut, September 19, 1816, Sally, born December 8, 1791, died in Winchester, December 27, 1819, daughter of Prince and Lucy (Adams) Taylor. He married (third), in Salisbury, Connecticut, August 21, 1820, Lucy Northrup, born April 20, 1798, died March 26, 1884, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Bradley) Northrup. Hon. James Chamberlain Cleveland removed to Philadelphia in 1813, and engaged in business selling groceries and clocks; also taught school six months. The early death of his wife greatly disheartened him, and he sold out his entire business, stock and fixtures, returning June, 1814, to Winsted, where he always dwelt afterward. He was a clock manufacturer and farmer. He represented his town in the legislature in 1834; was assessor for fifteen years, and filled several offices of trust with ability. He was of small size, had light hair and blue eyes. He was a man of few words, but of plain speech when occasion, required. He died after a short, but severe illness, universally esteemed and respected. His third wife survived him. Child of first marriage: Charles Miller, born May 4, 1814; children of third marriage: Jane, mentioned below; son, born and died April 28, 1825.

    (VII) Jane, daughter of James Chamberlain Cleveland, was born July 21, 1821, in Winsted, Connecticut, died in Winsted, August 29, 1888. She married in Winsted, May It, 1842, Charles Hamlin Blake (see Blake VI).

    (The Mitchell Line).New England families, genealogical and memorial By William Richard Cutter

     

     

     

     

    Stephen Northrup was born in Salisbury, Connecticut, in 1780, and died in Fulton Settlement in 1872. At the time of his decease, he was the last of the pioneers of his locality. He came to Bethel (prob NY)in May, 1807, and after viewing the country, concluded to go back to his birthplace. When he reached the Neversink, he met /Minimi Hawley, one of his old neighbors, who was. moving to Bethel with his family. Hawley was very glad to meet him; but sorry to learn that he was returning. After a conversation concerning their affairs, Northrup was led to alter his purpose once more, and again return to Fulton Settlement.

    This meeting took place on the east side of the Neversink. The river was very much swollen by the spring rains. There was no bridge, and the ford was impassable: at least Hawley did not dare to put his oxen, cart, wife and children in peril by attempting to cross in the usual manner. So he took the yoke from the necks of his cattle, and compelled them to swim over a short distance from the ford, where the water was smooth and deep. Then he unloaded his cart, took off its wheels and box, and conveyed or towed every thing to the opposite shore in or behind a log canoe! The task was difficult and dangerous: but was safely performed, and the adventurers proceeded on their way.
    * Adam, a ion of John Pintler, wag born May 2, 1805. and Eve Flutter was born October 7,1808. Both of these births preceded that of Catharine Fulton.

     

    They spent two days in traveling from the Neversink to the west-branch of the Mongaup. When they passed the latter, a heavy rain set in. Night was approaching, and they were in an almost trackless forest, far from human nabitation. The discomforts of the day were bad enough; but they were far exceeded by the prospective miseries of the night. The first care of the men was for the young mother and her two little children. With an axe they made the frame of a diminutive tent, which they covered with blankets. In this, Mrs. Hawley and the little ones passed the dismal night, while the men fared as well as they could under the dripping trees.

    On the third day they reached a clearing made by one of the Fultons, where they found a deserted cabin. Into this Hawley moved. Having thus piloted his friends to their new home, Xorthrup returned to Connecticut, and three weeks later came back with, his family. After occupying a temporary shelter for a few months, he moved to the place where he spent the remainder of his days. During the last fifty-six years of his life, his daily walk and conversation were in accord with the strict rules of the Presbyterian faith. He never sought to occupy a conspicuous position in this life; but was content with what was far better: the discharge, honestly and earnestly, of those duties which give life and beauty to Christian society.

    Joseph K. Northrup, a son of Stephen, was the first male child born hi Fulton Settlement.

    History of Sullivan County By James Eldridge Quinlan, Thomas Antisell

     

    NORTHROP, David of Sherman, CT & Clarissa Lee of Mt. Washington Dec. 30, 1811
    Stephen of Salisbury, CT & Rhoda Vosburg Feb. 7, 1803

    VITAL STATISTICS
    of
    SHEFFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

    Marrages 1797 to 1850

     

    A ndr us-Andrews

    Mary, of Amity, and Elijah Grant of Litchfield, March n, 1755.

    Jonathan, of Milford, and Eunice Baldwin of Amity, Apr. 20, 1758.

    Reuben, and Sarah Ailing, Feb. 5, 1770.

    Ebenezer, and Abigail Sperry, July 27, 1774.

    John, and Anna Collins, Oct. 7, 1779.

    Simeon, and Anna Northrop, April 12, 1780.

    Riverius, of Amity, and Rebecca Thompson of Amity, Jan. 15, 1786.

    Rhoda, of Amity, and Anson Clinton of Amity, June 5, 1793.

    Joseph, of Amity, and Eunice Johnson of Derby, Aug. 31, 1794.

    Richard, and Elizabeth Bolles of Branford, Aug. 26, 1795.

    Selina, of New Haven, and Seth Turner, Feb. 23, 1813.

    Polly, of Woodbridge, and Ranson Scovil, or Sperry of Waterbury, April,

    1816.
    Jedidiah, and Elizabeth Baldwin, May 21, 1745

     

    ALSO

    Auger

    Abraham, of Amity, and Elizabeth Bradley, May 21, 1745.

    Phebe, of Mt. Carmel, and Abraham Hotchkiss of Mt. Carmel, Feb. 7, 1769.

    Martha, of New Haven, and Joseph Beecher of Amity, Feb. 5, 1766.

    Austin Joshua, of East Haven, and Abigail Northrop of Woodbridge, July 25, 1787

    The Connecticut magazine By Harry Clemons, William Farrand Felch, George C. Atwell,

     

    Allyn Hays b: August 05, 1718 in Norwalk,Fairfield,CT d: September 12, 1784 in Salisbury,CT
    .................  +Joseph Northrop b: May 11, 1716

    St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Bridgewater.

      The record of the organization of St. Mark's Episcopal Society begins with a
    meeting held at the dwelling house of Jonas Sanford, on Easter Monday, April 23,
    1810, at which William Gillett and Julius Camp were chosen wardens, Daniel
    Booth, Jeremiah Platt, and James Jessup, vestrymen, William Gillett, reading
    clerk, Samuel Lockwood, treasurer; also David Merwin, Joseph Wheeler, Blackman Jessup, Jeremiah Canfield, Treat Canfield, Jehiel Summers, and John Treat were chosen choristers, and Joel Sanford was elected to attend the State Convention within the year.

      The service was held at the dwellings of the several members, but more frequently at the house of Jonas Sanford, by lay-readers and neighboring ministers, for nearly twenty years, when an effort was made to build a house of worship. The site was located near the old burying-place west of where they finally built their first house, and the timber for the frame was collected at that place, but the question of the location or something of the kind caused the work to cease, and the matter was delayed some time. In 1835, the first house was erected about half a mile south of the present village, in the field, and afterwards a highway was made past it for the accommodation of the people. This building is still standing, is two stories high, and in a beautiful location. Soon after this the village began to increase in dwellings and population, and to become a center of trade, in consequence of the increase of the business of manufacturing hats, particularly by Glover Sanford, and this house of worship was found to be inconveniently located. Hence, in 1859 anew edifice was erected in the village where it now stands, which was consecrated March 14, 1860, by the Rt. Rev. John Williams.

      Among those ministers who officiated here before a house of worship was erected, are the names of Rev. B. Northrop, the Rev. Benjamin Benham of New Milford, and the Rev. Joseph S. Covel. Since 1835 the church has been under the pastoral charge of the following clergymen: Revs. Joseph S. Covel, Abel Nichols, George H. Nichols, William Atwell, Abel Ogden, William O. Jarvis, H. F. M. Whitesides, Abel Nichols, Merritt H. Wellman, William H. Cook, James Morton, H. D. Noble, X. Alanson Welton, W. B. Colburn, D.D., and G. V. C. Eastman, D.D., who resigned and removed to the West in 1882.

      The officers of the parish at the present time are: Jeremiah G. Randall, Eli Sturdevant, Wardens; Arza C. Morris, Albert B. Mallett, and Amos Northrop,
    Vestrymen (in 1882);
    Arza C. Morris, Treasurer; Jeremiah G. Randall, Delegate to Convention; and Eli Sturdevant, Clerk.

    Northrop, Sarah of Ammete (Amity
    ) and Hezekiah Camp Jr. of Sal., m
    Nov. 21, 1752, by Rev. Mr. Woodbridge, Pastor.

    Northrup, Abi, d. of Joseph Jr. and Mary, b. Feb. 13, 1767.

    Northrup, Annah and Abijah Rood, both of Sal., m. Aug. 22,
    1763, by John Hutchinson, J. P.
    See under A. Rood.

    Northrup, Elisabeth, d. of Joseph and Allen, b. in Ridgefield,
    Dec. 4, 1756.

    Northrup, Eunice, d. of Joseph and Allen, b. in Ridgefield, May

    3, 1755-
    Northrup, Jeremiah, s. of Joseph and Allen, b. in Ridgefield, Jan.

    8, 1759; d. Sept. 29, 1762, in his 4th year.
    Northrup, Jeremiah, s. of Samuel and Phebe, b. Feb. 12, 1765.
    Northrop, Mary, d. of Joseph Jr. and Mary, b. Feb. 17, 1765.
    Northrup, Phebe, d. of Samuel and Phebe, b. Feb. 19, 1766.

    Historical collections relating to the town of Salisbury, Litchfield county, Connecticut"

     

    ANDRUS NORTHROP is this ANDREW??

    he society of Newbury was organized into a town in 1788, and named Brookfield.

      The Assessors' list for that part of Newbury society which was contained within New Milford township in 1787, the last year the assessment was made before the town of Brookfield was organized, contained the following names:

    Josiah Burritt,
    Albert Barlow,
    Amarillis Barlow,
    Francis Burritt,
    Mitchel Barlow,
    Thaddeus Baldwin,
    Edward Beech,
    Tibbals Baldwin,
    Samuel Baldwin's heirs,
    Jonathan Beecher,
    Robert Bostwick,
    Enoch Buckingham,
    Sarah Camp,
    Theophilus Comstock,
    Ephraim Curtiss,
    Dea. Abraham Camp,
    Achilles Comstock,
    Levi Camp,
    Thomas Gushing, Esqr.,
    John Dunning,
    Isaac Hawley, Jr.,
    Liverius Hawley,
    Clement Hubbell,
    Benjamin Hawley,
    Nehemiah Hawley,
    Isaac Hawley,
    David Jackson,
    Ralph Keeler,
    Jonathan Keeler,
    David Keeler,
    Isaac Lockwood,
    Andrew Lake's heirs,
    Samuel Merwin, Jr.,
    Samuel Merwin,
    Nathan Merwin,
    Isaac Merwin,
    Andrew Merwin,
    Levi Merwin,
    John Morehouse,
    Isaac Northrop,
    Elnathan Noble,
    Wait Northrop,
    Joseph Nearing,
    Henry Nearing.
    John H. Nearing,
    William Nichols,
    Joshua Northrop,
    Andrus Northrop,

    Jesse Noble,
    James Osborn,
    Israel Osborn,
    Joseph Olmsted,
    Richard Olmsted,
    Henry Peck, Esqr.,
    David Peck,
    Amiel Peck,
    Ammi Palmer,
    Joseph Ruggles, Jr.,
    Comfort Ruggles,
    Artemus Ruggles,
    Benjamin Ruggles,
    Timothy Ruggles, Esqr.,
    Ashbel Ruggles,
    Samuel Ruggles,
    Hezekiah Stevens, Jr.,
    John Starr,
    David Smith,
    Joseph Smith,
    James Starr,
    Rufus Sherman,
    Samuel Sherman,
    Thomas Smith,
    Elijah Starr,
    Jehiel Smith,
    Joseph Tomlinson,
    John Veal,
    David Wakelee,
    Samuel Wakelee,
    Amos Wakelee,
    Martin Warner,
    Solomon Warner,
    Daniel Wheeler.

    Litchfield County CT Archives History - 
    Books .....Newbury Society 1882

     

    (The Gunn Line). JohnNorthhrop Gunn

    (I) Jasper Gunn, immigrant ancestor, came
    to New England in the ship "Defiance," in
    1635, then aged twenty-nine years. He settled
    in Roxbury, Massachusetts, where he was a
    proprietor of the town, and was admitted a
    freeman. May 25, 1636. He removed to Mil-
    ford, Connecticut, but was living in Hart-
    ford, Connecticut,^ in 1648. He settled finally,
    however, in Milford. In 1649 '^c was "freed
    from watching during the time that he attends
    the service of the mill." In 1636 he is called
    a physician in the public records. He was
    deacon of the church in Milford and perhaps
    school master, and on one occasion appeared
    before the court in the capacity of attorney.
    He was a deputy to the general court and an
    extremely active and versatile citizen. He
    married Sarah Hawley. He died January 12,
    1671. Children: Samuel: Jebomah, men-
    tioned below ; Daniel, married Deborah Cole-
    man
    and died in 1690: Nathaniel, settled in
    Branford ; Mehitable, baptized in 1641 ; Abel,
    baptized in 1643, '* physician at Derby, Con-
    necticut.

    (II) Jebomah, son of Jasper Gunn, was
    born 1641. He was also a resident of Mil-
    ford. He married, in 1660, Sarah Lane.
    Among their children was Captain Samuel,
    mentioned below.

    (III) Captain Samuel Gunn, son of Jebo-
    mah Gunn, was born in Milford in 1669, died
    there in 1749. He married, in 1698, Mercy
    Smith. Among their children was Lieutenant
    Samuel, mentioned below.

    (IV) Lieutenant Samuel (2) Gunn, son of
    Captain Samuel (i) Gunn, was born at Mil-
    ford, January 15, 1701, died in 1756. He mar-
    ried Sarah Clark, who was born October 24,
    1706. Among their children was Samuel,
    mentioned below.

    (V) Samuel (3), son of Lieutenant Samuel (2) Gunn, was born in Milford in 1740, died
    in Washington, January 7, 1782. He settled at Woodbury, Connecticut. He married Phebe
    Northrop, born April, 1735, a descendant of Joseph Northrop, a founder of Milford.
    Among their children was John Northrop,
    mentioned below.

    (VI) John Northrop, son of Samuel (3) Gunn, was born at Milford, June 5, 1772, died
    in Washington, October 3, 1826. He was a farmer, but for many years held and discharged the duties of deputy sheriff, an office then held in much honor, which he so accept ably filled that he became widely known and still lives in local tradition as "Sheriff" Gunn. He married, at Washington, Connecticut, October 25, 1797, Polly Ford, born June 19, 1773, at Milford, died January 15, 1827. She was highly esteemed for her goodness and refine ment and for her ready kindness and skill in nursing the sick. She was the daughter of Samuel and Susannah (Stone) Ford. Fler grandfather, Samuel Ford, died 1760, was son of John Ford, born 1654, died 171 1, and grandson of Thomas Ford, who came from England and died at Milford in May, 1662.
    Children of John Northrop and Polly Gunn : John Northrop, born August i, 1798: Louisa,
    March 3, 1800: Susan, October 10. 1801 : Abby, November 30, 1804; Lewis, November
    30, 1806; Sarah, October i, 1809; Amaryllis. September 14, 181 1 ; Frederick William, men-
    tioned below.

    (VII) Frederick W'ilIiam, son of John Northrop Gunn, was born at Washington, formerly Woodbury, Connecticut. October 4, 1818, died August "19, 1881. At the age of thirteen he began to attend a school in Cornwall kept by Rev. William Andrews. He prepared for college in 1831-32 at Judea Academy, then taught by Rev. Watson Andrews, son of Rev. William Andrews, and he .grad- uated from Yale College in the class of 1837. He taught in the academy at New Preston during the winters of 1837-38 ; in the Judea Academy, 1839-43 ; in the New Preston Academy, 1845-47 : in Towanda, Pennsylvania, 1847-48-49. He established the famous private school at Washington, i^>49. ami il came to be known as the Gunnery, in his lionor. It is at tile ijrescnt time one of tlic foremost preparatory schools of the country, of national fame, lie was Master nf the Gunnery from 1S49 t"i 1881. As a thinker an«I teacher, Mr. Gunn was far in advance of his time; in his schcx>l and town he exercised a powerful influence for the good of the community. The gratitude and reverence of his inijiils are ex- pressed in the book written and published by tlieiu. entitled " Ihe Master of the Gunnery."
    The people of Washington have shown their appreciation of his life and work among them
    by erecting the Gunn Memorial Library, a beautiful building which stands on a corner
    of Washington Green. It is described fur-
    ther ill the account of .\bigail Brinsmade
    Gunn elsewhere in this work. Mr. Gunn was
    alwa)s a strong supporter of the Ecclesiasti-
    cal Society of the First Congregational
    Church of Washington, of which his wife and
    dan;.;lilir were members. lie married, at
    \\ .i-iington, .\pril 16. 1848, .Abigail Irene
    Iiriii>inade, born at Washington, July 18,
    1820, died September 13, \C)oS, daughter of
    Daniel liourbon and Mary Wakeman (Gold)
    Brin>-made (see Drinsmade XTII). Children:
    I. Daniel Drinsmade, Kirn January 9, 1849, at
    Towanda, I'cnnsylvania, died .\pril 19. 1S65,
    at Washington. 2. Mary Gold, January 20,
    185.V at Washinu,'ton : married, October 4,
    187^1, John Chapiii I'.rinsniade (see Brins-
    made IX (.

     

    (V) Captain Isaac Gallup, son
    G.ALLUr of Captain John Gallup (q. v.),
    was Iwrn in X'oluniown. Con-
    necticut, the iiart now called Sterling, I'ebru-
    ary 24, 1712. He lived on his father's home-
    stead, and was prominent in town and church
    affairs. He representc<] the town in the gen-
    eral court from I7(>8 until 1773. He served
    in the revolutionary war, being lieutenant
    under Captain .\hel Spencer, of Grotoii. in the
    Tenth Company, Sixth Regiment. Colonel
    Samuel Ilolden Parsons. He served in Bos-
    ton and Connecticut. In 1776 he served in
    New York and Loni: Island campaigns, and
    was in the battles of Long Island an<l White
    Plains, under Colonel I'arsons. He was cap-
    tain of the Groton company. He also fought
    '" '777. I'is name being on the Connecticut
    rolls, pages 78-0(^100 and r>i8. He married
    Margaret, daughter of Nathaniel and Mar-
    prct Gallup, of Stonington, March 29. 1748.
    She was born October 12, 1730, died Decem-
    ber 9, 1817. He died .\ugust 3. 1791^ Chil-
    dren: John. l)orn December 29. 1749: Eliza-
    beth. January 22, 1755; Martha, Eebruary 17,

     

    Full text of "Genealogical and family history of the state of Connecticut; a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation"

    Paula Krimsky, Archivist
    krimskyp@gunnery.org
    860-868-7334 ext. 251

    In the year 1779, the township of Washington was formed in the County of Litchfield, and within its limits were included the lands owned by the Davies family, and it is recorded that on the 12th day of April, 1779, a number of the inhabitants took the oath of allegiance to the States, in open Freemen's Meeting.

    Among the names of those who, by the list given in the record, pledged themselves to the cause of the Revolution, we look in vain to find a single Davies, a fact which shows the steadfastness with which the whole family clung to their traditions of loyalty, although, possibly, it may not commend them to the patriotic feelings of their descendants.

    It had been the custom of Mr. John Davies to present annually to the Rev. Mr. Marshall, of Woodbury, a fat cow, and this he continued with great difficulty to do during the whole period of the war, although to accomplish this purpose in those times, it was necessary, as he has told, to take the animal by night, and by a long and circuitous route, to avoid being intercepted and robbed by those of the opposite political faith, in whose judgment a gift to an Episcopal clergyman was a treasonable offense. An instance of his generosity and kindness, which never failed even in those trying times, appears from an anecdote that is told in the biography of his youngest son, the Rev. Thomas Davies. After the close of the war a man who had taken an active part in driving off a number of cattle from his farm, and had committed other acts of plunder, having become destitute, applied for relief in his extremity to Mr. Davies, who not only pardoned him for the wrongs he had done, but liberally relieved his wants.

    After the close of the war, Mr. Davies' life was passed quietly and peacefully at his home, surrounded by his family, the greater part of whom depended upon him for support, and lived at or near the family homestead. His sons, John and William, had been ruined by the confiscation of their property during the war, and the latter had taken refuge in Canada.

    He still had in mind his father's wish that an Episcopal Church should be built at Birch Plains, upon the lands of the Davies family, and late in life he succeeded in accomplishing this object, as is told in Cothren's " History of Ancient Woodbury."

    After the separation of what was called Birch Plains or Davies Hollow from the township, the Davies family, one of considerable note and zealously attached to the Church, withdrew from the Litchfield Parish, and built a church edifice of their own in Davies Hollow, where, with assistance from some few families, who resided near, they sustained religious services according to the Liturgy of the Church of England, and kept up a distinct parochial organization, for a considerable period. The following is a copy of the Deed given by John Davies, father of Rev. Thomas Davies, to the Churchmen in Washington, making to them a conveyance of the lands upon which the house of worship was erected :

    " Know ye that I, John Davies, of that part of Washington formerly belonging to Litchfield, and known and called by the name of Birch Plains, in the County of Litchfield, for the consideration of an agreement or promise, made with and to my honored father, John Davies, late of Birch Plains, in said Litchfield, deceased, and for the love and affection I have and bear toward the people of the Church of England now in said town of Washington, and for securing and settling the service and worship of God among us, according to the usage of our most excellent Episcopal Church, whenever there shall be one legally organized in said Washington, and at all times forever hereafter, do therefore demise," etc., eta

    The measurement of the land as described in the deed must have been equal to ninety-six square poles, and it was restricted to use as a public burying- ground, and for the purpose of having a suitable place of worship erected upon it The same condition was annexed to it as that which was expressed in the deed given by his father to the church in Litchfield, viz.: the requirement of one peppercorn to be paid annually on the feast of St Michael the Archangel, if demanded. The above deed was given on the 2id of January, 1794. Upon this ground, principally at his own expense, an Episcopal Church subsequently was erected. Aged and infirm, and seated in an arm-chair at the door of his boose, he witnessed the raising of the edifice, with a feeling similar to that of the pious Simeon when he said, "Lord, now lettest thon thy servant depart in peace." He survived about three years, and at the age of eighty-six years he died on the 19th day of May, 1797, and was buried in the family burial-ground in Davies Hollow.

    John Davies, Jr.,

    Jokl Titus,

    Samuel P. Treat,

    Jakes J. Davies,

    Walter Davies,

    David Davies,

    George Davies,

    Abraham Woster,

    John Hull,

    William Lyons.

    St. John's Church, Washington, CT (birch Plains/Davies Hollow area) moved in 1815 to the town of washington

     

    From Sketches of Litchfield 1818 Litchfield as Lister

    Listers or Rate Makers From 1721 to 1819 At the later date, Assessors were substututed - the dutiees of the twoo office being much the same.

     

    1817 Northrop, Abner 7

     

    Joshua Garritt of Hartford listed as a first settler of Litchfield

     

    The first French war began in 1744

    Some Acadians (from Nova Scotia were distributed throughourt the Connecticut towns often separating families)

    "Last" French war began in 1755 an Litchfield was activelu involved

     

    The Underground Railroad in Litchfield County

    (And surrounding areas)





    This is information I have gleaned from reading area history books, talking with people, etc. If you have anything to add, any references I missed, any family oral traditions, I would appreciate hearing from you. I will include them in this page with your permission. Thank you.


    I am also working on a book, and this is only a fraction of the information that I have. Any help you can give, any information, even the slightest, would be most appreciated. I am interested not only in Litchfield County but any surrounding areas.


    -Quotes from "The Underground Railroad in Connecticut" by Horatio T. Strother, 1962.

    -p. 121-122- " As a conductor, Wakeman (of Norwalk), was bold and tireless, taking his "packages of hardware and dry good" to places as distant as Plymouth and Middletown - trips of forty and fifty miles as the crow flies, farther than that by road....

    -p. 122- "The Plymouth operators, to whom Wakeman presumably made his deliveries, included Joel Blakeslee, Ferrand Dunbar, and William Bull. They not only handled passengers from Wilton; they also had to keep watch for unaccompanied fugitives on foot who had lost their way on the western line between New Haven and Farmington. The Plymouth "minute men" had to set these wanderers on the right track, which took them a dozen miles eastward to Farmington."

    -p. 123 -Thus it is known that New Milford was a center of Underground work; but whether fugitives came to this town by traveling northward from the vicinity of Wilton, or eastward via a lateral from the Hudson River line in New York, or both, remains unclear."

    -"There are several stations here, (New Milford), one of which was the house of Charles Sabin. Another was the home of Augustine Thayer. He and "his good wife devoted their lives to the Abolition cause. They helped many poor slaves on their way, rising from their beds in the night to feed and minister to them and secreting them till they could be taken under cover of darkness to Deacon Geradus Roberts' house on Second Hill and from there to Mr. Daniel Platt's house in Washington."

    -p. 123-124 - Frederick W. Gunn of Washington, Connecticut, who founded the private school bearing his name, "The direction or runaways on the road to freedom, however, remained Gunn's private affair.

    -p. 124-"Daniel Platt and his wife....accomodating "many a trembling black refugee" on their farm. ...Their son, Orville,...later recalled that "the slaves stayed, as a rule, but a short time, though some remained several weeks until it was learned through the channels of communication among the Abolitionists that their whereabouts was suspected." They were then forwarded to either of two destinations - to Dr. Vaill on the Wolcottville Road or to Uriel Tuttle in Torrington."

    -p. 124-125 - "Yet, curiously, Uriel Tuttle was the only Underground stationmaster here of whom a record survives.

    -p. 125- "At Winchester, a few miles north of Torrington and close to Winsted, there was a small but active antislavery society. Noble J. Everett was its secretary; Jonathan Coe, a member who lived in nearby Winsted, managed a well-patronized Underground station at his house. Another station many have been the home of Silas H. McAlpine, poet, philanthropist, and abolitionist of Winchester; in the foundation wall of his house was a hidden crypt that was possibly a hiding place for fugitives, but there is no positive evidence that it was so used."

    -p 126 - "Beyond this point, there were stations to the north in Colebrook and to the northwest in Norfolk. Who were the Undergroung agents in Colebrook remains unknown, but there were certainly several of them. One may have been J. H. Rodgers, secretary of the ninety-member antislavery society in 1836.

    -"It is also reported that there was a network of Underground byways in this vicinity and that residents of Norfolk were responsible for paving many of them."

    -p. 126-127- " For the fugitive traveling through northwestern Connecticut, Norfolk was the last stop in the state. From here, he was sent across the Massachusetts border to New Marlboro, thence over to the Housatonic River line through Stockbridge and Pittsfield to Bennington, Vermont."

    -from Appendix 2 - "Underground Railroad Agents in Connecticut" (Probable agents are indicated by *) Litchfield County Blakeslee, Joel - Plymouth Bull, William - Plymouth Coe, Jonathan - Winsted Dunbar, Daniel - Plymouth McAlpine, Silas H. * - Winchester Pettibone, Amos - Norfolk Roberts, Geradus - New Milford Sabin, Charles - New Milford Thayer, Augustine - New Milford Tuttle, Uriel - Torrington


    -Quotes from "Barkhamsted Heritage-Culture and Industry in a Rural Connecticut Town", edited by Richard G. Wheeler and George Hilton, 1975.

    -p. 235 - "Lamont's Christmas Tree Plantation - Located at the site of one of Barkhamsted's earliest houses, which saw use as an inn on the route from the Salisbury iron works toward Granby.....The house, known 50 years ago as the Oscar Tiffany place, was bought in 1952 by Thomas and Marguerite Lamont...Legend has it that the house was also a stop on the Underground Railroad."


    Scan of Colebrook River, from an old postcard
    (Kind of tickles me, Cotton Mill in town and they were hiding slaves?)

    -Quotes from "Colebrook Stories", by Alan DeLarm, 1979.

    -"Chamberlain's hotel, The Colebrook River Inn, was at one time used as a station in the underground railroad." -"The Davidson house on the Old Colebrook Road is also said to have been an underground railroad station."


    -Quotes from "Howard Peck's New Milford - Memories of a Connecticut Town", edited by James E. Dibble, 1991.


    -p. 58-60- "Seventy-five years after the Bostwick place was erected it became one of the stations on the Underground Railroad. It is known that there was a hiding place beneath the floor of the attic. This compartment could hold two persons, and as it was near a chimney could provide warmth during the cold winter season. ..."

    -"Another alleged station in this system was a home in the Lanesville section of this town. It is located about four miles south of the village center and has been known as the Wanzer Farm......(they were Quakers)"

    -"Fugitives from slavery in the deep South entered New Milford at several places. Some were directed from New York State, directly west of New Milford. It would seem natural that they might have entered through the Town of Sherman, although little has been written or recorded as to that being the case. However, it has been stated that one known station on the system was in Sherman, a short distance north of the center of town in an old colonial residence lying on the westerly side of the present road leading north from the center toward the New York State line or to Gaylordsville. This station was in the Stuart family. The residence is still standing, a landmark and heritage to be preserved. James Stuart was reportedly the agent. It is alleged that there was a small out-building on the premises just north of his dwelling where the escapees would be housed and it would seem likely that some of them would come over the hills to New Milford."

    -"Again, near the village, was the home of Augustine A. Thayer, known to his cronies as "Baccus."....from a New York newspaper....a reward of five hundred dollars offered for the apprehension of two runaway slaves. It was expressed by one of the men present that it would not surprise him, "if they would be found at that moment at Baccus' home."

    -"Many of the fugitives were aided over the hills to Washington, about five or six miles east of New Milford. One of the most ardent supporters of the movement there was Frederick W. Gunn. ...With Mr. Gunn was Daniel Platt, as devoted an agent on the system as there was anywhere. Mr. Platt and his wife rescued and aided many a poor soul fleeing to Canada."

    -"The route continued from Washington north to Litchfield, then on to Torrington, which was the birthplace of John Brown. It is reported that as early as 1837 there was an organization composed of forty members of an antislavery group in that town. Colebrook and Norfolk were the actual jumping off places in Connecticut. From these towns the fugitives crossed the line into Massachusetts, crossed the Housatonic River to Stockbridge, to Pittsfield, into Vermont, to Bennington, Burlington, Rutland, and on into Canada and freedom."


    Underground Railroad notes from various sources:

    When the first pages of my web site were posted, I received an email from someone (I wish that person, if they ever read this, would get back in contact with me) that mentioned that the Christmas shop in the town of Bethlehem was used to hide runaway slaves. If I remember correctly, I was told it was a printing shop and the slaves would spend the night there before moving on to the next station, most likely in Litchfield.

    I heard from a friend that a home north of the rotary in Goshen was a station in the 1800's. I quote from the Goshen history, 1897, page 363: "The store built and occupied by Wadhams and Thompson, and later by Moses Wadhams, was purchased by A. Miles and Sons, who also had a store at West Goshen. Moses W. Gray entered their employ as clerk, in 1841. At this time, Mr. MIles and one son lived at West Goshen, and another son at the Center, with whom Mr. Gray boarded. At his death, Mr. Gray managed the store for about three years, when he purchased a one-half interest and continued to manage it for several years under the firm name of Miles and Gray. He then purchased the interest of his partner and conducted the business alone, the sign over the door bearing the name of M. W. Gray. In 1857, he sold his stock of goods, and, removing to Chicago, enaged in the wholesale grocery business......" -I have talked to a previous landowner, and he told me there is a room in the basement that is undetectable, unless you know it is there. Convienent having a freight business with a hidden room for that special cargo.

    I also heard that a house in South Kent has "extra rooms" on the fireplace foundation in the basement. I know which house, but nothing more than that.

    Another reference I have, and have no idea where it came from, is Blueberry Hill Farm, between Norfolk and Colebrook, on Rock Hall Road. Supposedly there are false panels behind the fireplace, concealing an entrance to another room.

    Mentioned in a Register Citizen article, (I didn't get the date), the Cook homestead on Charles Street in Torrington was used as a station. Runaways were hidden in a section of a dining room closet.

    Also, a Register Citizen article, dated 12-31-94, by Bryan T. Morytko, mentions the following: Harwinton - Rt. 4, the Chiarmonte and the Hinnan houses, the Hinnan home have a secret place in the attic floor, next to a chimney, large enough for three people. Torrington - Torringford Street (very active antislavery society in this area) - three or four houses on this street, including the Florian home, with a secret basement room Winchester - the Silas H. McAlpine home (already mentioned above)


    These are notes about Underground Railroad sites from visitors to my web site. Some are not exactly in northwestern Connecticut, but close enough.

    (Every little piece of the puzzle helps!)

    From Kevin Purcell, of Fairbanks, Alaska: "I can remember two houses in Northern Westchester that were rumored to be stops on the Underground. One is located on Route 138 east of Goldens Bridge, it is a large colonial just before the Increase Miller Elementary School on the north side of the road. The other is on Route 100 south of Somers, New York. It is a larger stone house that had one of the old stone mile markers out front."


    New quote - added August 29, 1999

    -from "Mysteries and Histories of Goshen", June 21, 1938, by Mrs. Lora Ives. Handwritten manuscript

    -"At my father's place, known as Whist Pond Manor......The Manor house was built in 1772 by Nathaniel Parmelee. It contained a secret chamber by the great stone chimney, to which access was easy from the downstairs closet, under the stairs in the front hall, by moving a board in the ceiling, also by a movable panel in a shallow closet upstairs, and by a loose board in the attic floor. The chimney kept the room warm in winter and it is supposed to have been used to secrete English refugees in Colonial days, also for runaway slaves during and before the Civil War. The place called Bald Ledge where the Sterlings lived for several years at the north end of the street, is said to have a similar room."

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    Elijah Serman Woodbury known as Father Sherman was Episcopal became dissatisfied and joined the methodists (1812 became a class leaader). He wwas active and zealous and encourage the groth of and a meetinghouse was built 1824

    At bridgewater is the junction with state 67 left on state 67 winding over the hills to the shepaug river ad Roxbury station at 2.9 miles onthe left (dirt road Mine Hill 1750 mine opened hpoing to find silver later run as an iron mine -- large perfect pyrite crystals can be found and other minerals in small crystals -- it is an ore vein along a fault.) nothe of roxbury station state 67 crosses a concrete bridge and passes pulpit rock L 3.1 miat the river's edge ehind a barnwhere John Eliot, apostle to the indians, is believe to hhave preached his Gospel of Peace State 67 swings sharpe R and combines with state 199 at 4.6 mi

    Left on state 199 is Washington Green 4.5 mi (see tour 4c) traversing a region rich in old houses , fragrant with sweet rocket in season, this is a pleasant journey for any travelkers with time to spare for leisurely exploration.

    ROXBURY

    route 67 5.3 mi was the home of Ethan Allen, Seth Warner (hero of Crown Point)and Remember Baker. [Rigt from Roxbury Green, rte 199 at 2.8 mi Roxbury Falls, ]

    at Roxbury green, state 67 swings right to the valley of Jack's Brook, a trout stream winding toward the Shepaug.

    (Transylvania -- Southbury/Roxbury Road Route 67)

    At 10 m. is the Transylvania Crossroads, locally known as Pine Tree . At transylvania is the junction with State 172. -- Right at State 172 .3 mi, under the hilll at the west of the highway is an unusual building probably the oldest n the South Britain Society hald wood, half stone.

     

    Route 47 is Woodbury/Washington Road

     

    1740 woodbury maybe towards southbury which was a part of woodbury at the time, several families Masters, Castle, Squire, Warner Ward, were early among those who adopted Episcopal opinions.a church was erected on the hill between Rosbury and Transylvania near the old graveyard.

    another episcopal church was erected in the ancient limits of the township of woodbury at Judea, now Washington, in Davis Hollow.(There is a davis Road in East Kent near spectacle ponds.)

     

    The woodbury church( Episcopal), St. Paul';s Church Woodbury, members of the parish living in southbury, Bethlem and middlebury --Wheelers, Benham, Osborne of Southbury, Doct Hull and Prentices of Bethlem. In 1791 the Rev Mr. Sayre was opposed to the adpotion of the state constitution. It was apparently a bitter controversy which included imputations on the Bishpo and clergy and left a mark even after Sayre left. The committee of the convention inclcuded MessrsPhillip, Perry, Truman, Marsh and Ives.the constitution was accepted in Nov 1794.IOt was during this controversy that Mr. Elijah Sherman left the Episcopal church for the methodist "He could not adopt Calvinistic opinions then ardentluy pressedin all the Congregational pulpits:.for 20 years worshipers gathered at his house.He lived to see the erection of a methodist church at his own homestead.

    Later led by Rev S. G Hitchcock. After 1801 the number of worshipers dwindled to almost noone. But increased again after 1809.

    List Of Clergymen Who Have Officiated In St. Paul's Church, Woodburv.

    Commencement. Termination.

    November, 1771, Rev. John Rutgers Marshall, died January 7th, 17S9.

    1790, " JaruesSayre, 1791.

    1791, " Seth Flint, 1793. 1793, " Reuben Ives, 1797. 1797, " Tillotson Bronson, D. D., 1798. 1799, " Bethel Judd, D. D.. August, 1SOI.

    Easter, 1S09, " Joseph D. Welton, June, 1818.

    August, 1816, " Sturges Gilbert, August, 1827.

    1S27, " Bennett Glover, 1827.

    List Of Clergymen Who Have Officiated In St. Paul's Church, Woodburv.
    Commencement. Termination.
    November, 1771, Rev. John Rutgers Marshall, died January 7th, 17S9.
    1790, " JarmesSayre, 1791.
    1791, " Seth Flint, 1793. 1793, " Reuben Ives, 1797.
    1797, " Tillotson Bronson, D. D., 1798.
    1799, " Bethel Judd, D. D.. August, 18OI.
    Easter, 1809, " Joseph D. Welton, June, 1818.
    August, 1816, " Sturges Gilbert, August, 1827.
    1827, " Bennett Glover, 1827.

    November, 1827, Rev. Samuel Fuller, Jr., D. D, April, 1S98.

    1S2S, " William H. Judd, 1828.

    November, 182S, " William Lucas, . 1829.

    1829, " Ulysses M. Wheeler, 1830.

    1831, " Daniel Hurhans, D. D., July, 1831.

    July, 1S31, « Joseph Scott, April, 1S33.

    1834, " _ John Dowdney, 1838.

    Easter, 1835, " Edmund C. Bull, Easter, 1S36.

    July, 1S36, " P. Teller Babbitt, March, 1S37.

    May, 1837, " Solomon G. Hitchcock, August, 1S44.

    October, 184-4, " Richard Coxe, November, 1845.

    November, 1845, " David P. Sanford, February, 1847.

    Easter, 1847, " Charles S. Putnam, April, 1848.

    June, 1849, «' P. Teller Babbitt, September, 1850.

    October, 1850, " Robert C. Rogers, January, 1853.

    May, 1853, " F. D. Harrimon.

    The following persons born in this parish, and receiving their religious impressions and culture in the Episcopal church, have been ordained priests and officiated as such :

    Rev. Phillips Perry, Rev. "William Preston,

    " Philo Perry, « Martin Moody,

    " James Thompson, " Thaddeus Leavenworth,

    " Rufus Murray, " Henry B. Sherman.

     

    notes to Woodbury Episcopal Church and Woodbury Methodis church 6/22/09

     

    Militia during the first 2 years o the was able bodied men between the ages ofd sixteen and fifty. Early In 1777 enlistements of three years or during the war were called for and the quota for each town established. It was a severe levy on the already weakened strength of the towns. Large bounties were offered for those who would enlist and neavy taxes laid on the property of inhabitants who were not liable for military duty or did not enlist.
    • Name: Sarah HUBBELL
    • Given Name: Sarah
    • Surname: Hubbell
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 22 Jun 1770
    • Change Date: 26 Aug 2003 1



      Marriage 1 William BURR b: 23 Jan 1762
      Children
      1. Has No Children Avis BURR b: 26 May 1797 in Of Southbury, New Haven, Ct

     

    Children of Heth Northrup and Anna Newton are:
    + 160   i. Newton Northrop was born 26 MAY 1781 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 6 JAN 1858.
      161   ii. Elizabeth Ann Northrup was born 7 MAY 1783 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died UNKNOWN in Morris, Connecticut. She married Job Smith 7 JAN 1803, son of Caleb Smith and . He was born ABT. 1781, and died UNKNOWN.

    The accumulation of unwelcome tasks meant months of dismal drudgery to Senator Platt. Just how great a sacrifice it all was to him may be gleaned from his correspondence. Congress adjourned the last week in June, and he hurried home to Judea for such rest as he could get. Writing from there to John H. Flagg he says:

    My summer seems already broken up. I have to enjoy this place thinking about it when I am far away from it. If there is anything that will bring you health, enjoyment, and happiness it is this Litchfield County life. I have read first and last a good many entertaining disquisitions on where the Garden of Eden was located, but it seems strange that in all the places that have been claimed for it between the North and South Poles, no one has ever said Litchfield County, but I am sure that this was the original paradise. Norfolk is rather on the outer edge of it. Washington, and especially the Judea end of Washington, was right in the centre of the garden. I do not think that the tree of knowledge of good and evil where Eve cut up such a prank at the instance of Old Nick was just hereabouts. I think she must have wandered out of the garden a little to find the tree; for every tree here is pleasant to the sight and good for food.

    But that summer was to be a busy one, with little in it of the peace of Judea. Not only was he burdened with the work of analyzing Cuban finances but he was called upon as usual to bear his part in the Presidential campaign which resulted in the election of McKinley and Roosevelt. When he returned to Washington at the beginning of the short session in December he was weary rather than rested by this summer's absence; but the session upon which he was about to enter proved to be one of the most exhausting, as it was perhaps the most momentous of his entire career.

     

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT

    Litchfield, Connecticut


    The Town of Washington encompasses the following Villages:

    Washington Depot

    Washington (or Washington Green) --  the Old Judea

    New Preston --  located on the Aspetuck River.

    Marbledale (or Marble Dale)


    Geology:

    Washington sits on Green Hill overlooking the winding Shepaug River.  Washington Depot lies along the Shepaug River at the foot of Green Hill. 

    26 miles of the Shepaug River here are deemed "wild."


    History:  (information about Washington Depot overrepresented)

     

    1734 – the eastern section of Washington was settled by Joseph Hurlbut. It was known as the Parish of Judea and belonged to Woodbury.
    The western section was known as the Parish of New Preston and belonged to New Milford.
    Nettleton Hollow, Romford and Smoky Hollow belong to Litchfield. 

    1740  --  the Titus family settled on Lower Church Hill.

    1741 -- the western section, part of the New Milford North Purchase, was first settled.

    1741  --  Judea Parish gathered. 

    1746 – Edward Cogswell secured the right to mine iron ore in the New Milford North Purchase. The Iron Works, the first industry in the North Purchase, was established along the Aspetuck River, near the foot of the road leading to New Preston hill.

    1746 – land purchased from the Indians for the building of the Averill Homestead (on Baldwin Hill Road about 1.5 miles from New Preston). The Averill family still lives there. 

    as early as 1748  --  1.5 miles downstream from Factory Hollow, the South Shepaug Factory Complex (consisting of a sawmill and gristmill and first known as Platt's Mills then Baldwin-Olmstead mills) built. 

    1753 – the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut granted a petition to establish the New Milford North Purchase section as the Ecclesiastical Society of New Preston.

    1758-1794  --  Judah Baldwin ran the South Shepaug Factory Complex.

    1760 – the Titus Homestead built.

    1772 – in Washington Village, the Old Red House built by two brothers Leman and Joel Stone, a Whig and a Tory.

    1775-1783 – American Revolution. General George Washington came through the area several times. He even spend a night in New Preston at Cogswell Tavern. Thirty Revolutionary soldiers were buried in the original Judea Cemetery.

    1778 – there were 270 families living in the area

    1779 – the Town of Washington incorporated. It was taken from Woodbury, Litchfield, Kent, and New Milford. The town was named in honor of General George Washington, who traveled through the area several times during wartime.

    1780s  --  Mallory Brook was named for Caleb Mallory and his family who were murdered at this time. Their hired hand, Davenport, was hanged for the crime.

    1781 – Major Cogswell owned a tavern along the "turnpike" at which General Washington dined. Justice of the Peace, Major William Cogswell, son of Edward, was elected the town's first selectman.

    1790-1831  --  Moody ran the Moody Fulling Mill for 41 years.  He was a leading citizen of Washington. 

    1794  --  in Romford, St. John's Episcopal Church built.

    1801 – on the Green in Washington Village, the Congregational Church built.

    1802-1876  -- on New Preston Hill Rd., was the boyhood home of Horace Bushnell, Congregational clergyman. (His birthplace was at Bantam in Litchfield.)  He was the pivotal American theologian who freed mainstream Protestant theology from its Puritanism, thus helped to clear the way for religious liberalism.

    1815  --  the St. John's Episcopal Church was moved by oxen to a site on Green Hill.

    1816  --  the dam at the South Shepaug Factory Complex rebuilt by brothers Levi S. and Ely Platt.  

    At first Washington was principally a farming community.

    Some of the early industries were ironworks and quarries as well as small mills and factories run by waterpower along the Shepaug and Aspetuck Rivers.

    1822 – at Marbledale, where there were quarries in an earlier day, the brick St. Andrews Episcopal Church built.

    1824 – at the west end of New Preston, the native stone Congregational Church built.

    1827  -- birth of the future Senator Orville Hitchcock Platt in Washington.  

    1832  -- Marvin Dimcock built a cotton-woolen plant, the third mill factory complex along the Shepaug River.

    1835  --  Olmstead took over the South Shepaug Factory Complex.

    1843  --  the Dimcock complex was sold at a loss. 

    1844  --  the old Dimcock mill sold and became the Washington Company (until 1851).  Other owners included Herman Baldwin, Frank Kilbourn and Charles Dipple. 

    1844  -- Joseph W. Titus bought an area along the Shepaug River.

    1846  --  Titus leased from John Northrup Gunn the right to a stretch of Shepaug River.  He erected a weir dam and directed some of the river water to a sawmill built at the southern end of his channel. 

    1849  -- Orville Hitchcock Platt admitted to the Bar. (He had attended the Yale University Law School.)

    1850 – the Gunnery School, a preparatory school for boys, established by a remarkable teacher, Frederick W. Gunn (1816-1881.)

    1854 map  -- there were mills on the Shepaug River and the Kirby and Mallory Brooks.

    Underground Railroad  --  the Underground Railway stopped on Blackville Road at Mrs. Ney's barn.

    1861-1865 – the Civil War.

    1866  --  Olmstead bought the old Moody Fulling Mill for $6.07 for non-payment of town taxes.

    by 1871  --  Henry Woodruff gained control of the land and mill of Joseph W. Titus.

    1871 --  Factory Hollow became Washington Depot.

    1871 photo  --  shows the Match Factory and Henry Woodruff's mill and factory in Factory Hollow.

    1872 – the Shepaug Railroad reached Washington.

    1873-1877  --  Henry Woodruff's three-story factory building housed the Match Factory.

    1877-1881  --  Henry Woodruff's three-story factory building housed part of  his carriage making venture.

    1879-1905  --   Orville Hitchcock Platt became a U.S. Senator. 

    1879   --  birth of the future Major General Benjamin D. Foulois (1879-1967).  He would serve in the Spanish-American War. 

    shortly before 1880  --  shortly before Olmstead's death, the South Shepaug Factory Complex was foreclosed.

    1881  -- death of Frederick W. Gunn.

    1881-1908  --  Henry Woodruff's factory building housed Kingman Mills.

    1881  --  Carl Bader (1853-1924) entered the U.S. from Alsace-Lorraine. 

    1882  -- Carl Bader arrived in Washington Depot. He would eventually establish a meat market and run it for 40 year.  The store was known variously as Carl Bader, Bader & Sons and Bader's Market.

    c. 1887 photo  --  the marshalling yard and the Washington Market building. 

    1888  -- notorious Blizzard of 1888.

    late 1880s  --  the mills of the South Shepaug Factory Complex run by various owners until ice jams and flooding destroyed the dam. 

    1893-1918  --  the home farm  for Holiday House was in existence.  Holiday House was a summer vacation home for the Working Girls' Club.  The club was associated with Saint Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, New York City.

    Edward Hook Van Ingen, a man grown wealthy from the woolen imports business, had architect Ehrick K. Rossiter design a house in memory of their oldest daughter Jeannine, who died of scarlet fever at the age of 16.  The house was on a promontory overlooking the Shepaug River valley.

    c. 1900 photo --  the mill in Factory Hollow.

    c. 1900 photo  --  Ezra Hull's blacksmith shop.

    1902 – about 3/4 mile northeast of Washington Village, Wykeham Rise, a preparatory school for girls, established.

    1908 – the Gunn Memorial Library, named for abolitionist and Gunnery School founder Frederick William and his wife, Abigail Brinsmade Gunn, dedicated.

    1909  --  Lt. Foulois accompanied the Wright brothers on their flight tests for the U.S. Army.  He would become the first living person to be enshrined in the Air Force Museum. 

    1910 photo --  looking down river from the Green Hill bridge.

    1912  --  St. John's Episcopal Church (of wood) burned; Ehrick Rossiter designed the present church (of stone).

    1919  --  architect Ehrick Rossiter and family moved to Edgewood.  He brought his New York caretaker, Ed Coll, up to Washington to look after his first and second house.  Ed Coll's sister Anne married an artist named deValera and had a child named Emon.  When deValera died, Ed Coll send his sister and nephew back to Ireland to grow up with close relatives.  Emon deValera grew up to be a prime mover of Irish independence and later prime minister of Ireland.

    1925 – Ehrick Rossiter gave the town its first preserve, the Steep Rock Reservation.

    1928  --  Borden's Cremery closed. 

    1929 – Pavilion Hall erected in New Preston as a cultural club.

    1930s  --  in Washington Depot, Borden's Creamery torn down to build Bryan Memorial Town Hall.  It was named for hometown boy Gregory Seeley Bryan, owner of the Weed Chain Company in Bridgeport and donator of the money for the new town hall.  The old town hall was taken down and the area became the town park. The World War I memorial placed here.

    1930s  --  Bob's Diner sold out to bouncer Jack Williams who built Jack's Grill. 

    1930  --  passenger trains stopped running to the aea. 

    1930  --  the Romford School for children established in Washington Depot. It is now Rumsey Hall. 

    1932  --  the new town hall finished. 

    1936  -- the Bader Brothers sold the old Titus/Woodruff mill to Thomas Rosford who ran it until 1952. 

    1941-1945  --   World War II.

    1941  --  Americans set up the Emergency Rescue Committee to help artists escape from the Nazis to the USA.  The committee arranged for French artist André  Masson (whose wife Rose was Jewish) to travel to the Caribbean island of Martinique, and from there to enter the United States. The Masson family settled in New Preston, Connecticut. After the war he returned to France.

    after World War II  --  in Washington Depot, Jack's Grill, the working man's bar, became the Shepaug Club.  

    1947  --  the old Dimcock mill ended as Dipple's cider mill.

    1947  -- Irish hero Emon deValera came to Washington to see his American relatives.

    1948 – the Shepaug Railroad‘s freight line closed.

    1952  --  the old Titus/Woodruff/Bader/Rosford mill turned into an egg candling factory.

    1955 – a flood destroyed many homes and businesses in Washington Depot.

    closed 1964  --  Robert Woodruff, a descendent of Henry Woodruff, was the last man to run a mill on the Aspetuck River.  He ran a machine shop out of the old Beeman mill in New Preston.  (He was also the last man to run a mill on the Shepaug River.)   After leaving the mill, Robert was struck with MS and was never able to stand again.

    1967  --  death of Major General Fulois.   

    1990s  --  the Shepaug Club closed down as a bar and restaurant. 

    1999  --  the designer Bill Blass sold his company for $50 million and retired to his home in New Preston.

    Today – the population exceeds 4,000.


    Sources:

    William C. Bader (with Pamela M. Redmer).  1998.  An American Village: The Light at the North End of the Tunnel. Washington Depot, CT: Design to Printing. 

    The Town of Washington, Connecticut: About Washington.  http://www.washingtonct.org/about.html

    Washington, Connecticut from the Connecticut Guide, 1935.  http://members.skyweb.net/~channy/CTGuideWash.html

     

    Back to the w. Connecticut Page
    Back to the Main Page

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF WASHINGTON

    Nettleton Hollow, Romford and Smoky Hollow belong to Litchfield. ... 1846 -- Titus leased from John Northrup Gunn the right to a stretch of Shepaug River. .... The Town of Washington, Connecticut: About Washington. ...
    www.nynjctbotany.org/lgtofc/washingtonconnhist.html - Cached - Similar

     



    Two Revolutionary War veterans, Asa Northrop and Samuel Hawley, are buried here. As in other Brookfield cemeteries Brookfield

    Connecticut Reports

                                                    By Connecticut. Supreme Court of Errors

    Some interesting cases involving Northrops -- mention of a John Northrop and Gad Northrop

    1865 Alvin day book Mention of "Went to Woodville". This would be after Amos death. AJN shows Gerry's death as March 14, 1875, New Haven, Conn.

    Redding Ridge's tavern owner, Stephen Betts, certainly fits the profile:

    Lieutenant Stephen Betts, was a prominent character in the Revolution. He was an active patriot, and was taken prisoner by the British on their march to Danbury in April, 1777. A County Convention was held at his house/tavern on August 10, 1779.

    Betts was prominent in town politics, serving as Town Selectman during the Revolution, as well as several town committees formed in support of the war.

    General Samuel H. Parsons was headquartered at Betts' home/tavern from 1778 to 1781.

    1840 census warren map has an a.t. peck in the western district by the
    Kent border just above Trout Brook. No Northrop, Osborn185? by 1850
    Northrops were in Washington

    1868

    Col Canfield District 9 Washington map maybe route 147?

    also LA Canfield by cemetery east of Kirbys Brook in the Centre

    DN Canfield right in the center 1 door away from Cong Parsonage

    Mrs. J. Bishop Calhoun Street District 2 next to Washington Station

    Kent vital records
    NORTHROP
    Agur Curtis, s. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. May 8, 1812
    Agur Curtiss, m. Lucy Marsh SWIFT, b. of Kent, Jan. 22, 1839,
    by Rev. Henry B. Sherman, of New Preston
    Alvin, m. Sally ATWOOD, July 2, 1826, by Rev. L.P. Hickox
    Amos, m. Susan CHOCUM, Oct. 26, 1829, by John Mills, J.P.
    Ann Aurilla, m. Joel B. PRATT, Oct. 3, 1827, by Rev. L.P. Hickox
    Aurelia, d. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. Oct. 11, 1806
    David, Jr., of Sherman, m. Adaline FULLER, of Kent, Oct. 9, 1820, by Rev. Asa Blair
    Maryann, m. John HINCKLEY, June 24, 1832, by Lewis Mills, J.P.
    Thomas Wells, s. Thomas G. & Amelia, b. May 25, 1808

    Alvord, David died July 7, 1831 age 35

    Northrop, Agur C 1812-1857
    Northrop, Aurelia wife of Thomas G died Mar. 4, 1839 age 54y9m11d
    Northrop, Charles C son of A.C. & Lucy M died Nov. 28, 1852 age 2y5m4d
    Northrop, Lewis S 1843-1903
    Northrop, Lucy M Swift wife of A. C 1815-1900
    Northrop, Sarah Abby Barnum wife of L. S. 1839-1918
    Northrop, Thomas G died Sept. 8, 1850 age 79y8m3d
    Northrop, Thomas Mills born May 25, 1808 died July 24, 1885 age 77y2m

    Good Hill Cemetery Kent, Ct.

    Stones copied by Francelia Johnson
    Burials listed from Kent Burial Records

    ...........This is the original cemetery located in Kent, Ct. It is on Route 7
    north of the present town of Kent and north of the original settlement which
    was located in Flanders. One of the first churches is said to have been located
    on this site. Many of the stones are worn from the ages of time and hard to read.

     

    Early marriages Washington

    Samuel Northrop widow Sarah Dutton of Bethlehem June 2, 1779
    John Stoddard of Woodbury Phebe Northrop Sept. 11, 1786

    Record of Mortality
    IN
    Westbury and Watertown
    From March, 1741, TO May, 1859

    Child of Mr. Northrop --- Age 1 --------- 21 may 1853
    Daughter of Abigail Northrop --- Age 3 --------- 06 Feb 1791
    Jonathan Northop --- Age 70 --------- 11 Mar 1803
    Alfred M. Northrup --- Age 50 --------- 20 Oct 1849
    Child of Alfred Northrop --- Age 1 --------- 29 Jun 1845
    John Allen, son of John Northrop --- Age 2 --------- 07 Sep 1839
    John Northrup ( Middlebury) --- Age 59 --------- 11 Mar 1834
    Mrs. Sarah Northrop ( buried in Midbury) --- Age 80 --------- 02 Jan 1853
    Polly, wife of Alfred Northrop --- Age 41 --------- 10 Aug 1845

    Naugatuck

    hose Buried in Gunntown Cemetery,
    Naugatuck, Conn.

     

    By Miss Myrtle M. Jillson of Waterbury, Conn.

    Nichols, Myra, wife of Edward J., d. May 19, 1931
    (d. Robert & Margaret (Tukin) Northrup, b. Sharon, 1846)

    Prisoners under sentence for life:
    Names, age when admitted, nativity, where convicted, when convicted, crime. 
    Those marked with an asterisk were sentenced to be hanged,
    and their sentences were commuted by the Legislature
    to imprisonment for life. 

       Benjamin Scott, ae 27, b. New York; Litchfield; Sept. 2, 1841; attempt at
    murder
       Harry Andrews, ae 17, b. Weston, Ct.; Fairfield; Oct. 30, 1845; rape
       Lucina Coleman, ae 50, b. Hartford, Ct.; Sept. 25, 1849; murder, 2nd degree
       John Brown, ae 35, b. Ireland; Tolland; Nov. 3, 1849; murder, 2nd degree
       William O. Chapin, ae 32, b. Massachusetts; Hartford; Feb. 8, 1849; rape
       Benjamin S. Balcomb*, ae 21, b. Colebrook, Ct.; Litchfield; July 8, 1851;
            murder
       Henry Mennasseth*, ae 48, b. Farmington, Ct.; Litchfield; July 8, 1851;
            murder
       William H. Calhoun*, ae 20, b. Nassau, NY; Litchfield; July 8, 1851; murder
       Catharine Dunn, ae 34, b. Ireland; New London; Sept. 29, 1851; murder, 2nd
            degree
       Nicholas Parrava, ae 24, b. Island of St. Jago; New London; Oct. 5, 1853;
            murder, 2nd degree
       Michael Mooney, ae 28, b. Ireland; New Haven; Nov. 8, 1853; murder, 2nd
            degree

       Morris Nichols, ae 29, b. Greenfield, Ct.; Fairfield; Mar. 10, 1854;  murder,
            2nd degree
       Isaac Randolph*, ae 45, b. Pennsylvania; N. Haven; July 16, 1856; murder, 2nd
            degree

       Albert Northrop, ae 22, b. Washington, Ct.; New Haven; Sept. 13, 1856;
            bestiality

       John A. Benson, ae 35, b. Rocky Hill, Ct.; Middlesex; Sept. 25, 1858; perjury
            with intent to take life
       Benjamin Roberts, ae 40, b. New Milford, Ct.; Hartford; Dec. 29, 1858;
            murder, 2nd degree
       John P. Warren, ae 21, b. Coventry, Ct.; Tolland; Dec. 14, 1859; murder, 2nd
            degree

    from

    Statewide County CT Archives History .....Report
    Of The Directors Of The Connecticut State Prison, 1860 May 1860

    http://files.usgwarchives.org/ct/statewide/history/reportof87gms.txt

    Gold

    Daniel, Samuel, and Stephen Gold (now written Gould), brothers, members of a Fairfield family that had been prominent in church and state for several generations, were among the early settlers of the town, though none of their descendants are now found among us. Daniel appears first: he married Grace, daughter of Deacon Stephen Burr, and lived where James Lord now lives. His children, as named in the will of Deacon Burr, were: Abigail, who married Richard Nichols. Esther, who married Nathaniel Northrop. Sarah, who married David Turney. Mary, who married Seth Price; and Elizabeth.

    Samuel Gold settled in Lonetown, and built the house now owned by Seth Todd. He was a soldier in the Revolution, and was wounded at the skirmish in Ridgefield. Some of the officers of Putnam's commnd had their quarters at Mr. Gold's during their encampment in Redding. Their children were: Hezekiah, Daniel, Burr, Aaron, Sarah, Polly, and Grace. Stephen Gold settled on the farm later owned by Timothy Platt in Lonetown. He is called captain in the records. He did not long remian a resident of Redding, but returned, it is said to Greenfield.

    The Early Families of Redding Connecticut (CT)

    http://www.historyofredding.com/HRFamilies.htm

    • ID: I124634
    • Name: Harriet Northrop
    • Surname: Northrop
    • Given Name: Harriet
    • Sex: F
    • Birth: 1810
    • _UID: 4A9334CBAA27D6429890742A5A7FB7C9E40D
    • Census: 1850 Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
    • Change Date: 15 Dec 2007 at 00:00:00



      Marriage 1 Seymour Morehouse [hill 36] b: 24 Jan 1798 in
      Washington
      , Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
      • Married: 7 Sep 1828
      Children
      1. Has No Children Henry S Morehouse b: 1836 in
        Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
      2. Has No Children Artemita Morehouse b: 1839 in
        Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
      3. Has No Children Noble Morehouse
      4. Has No Children Harriet Morehouse b: 1842 in
        Washington, Litchfield Connecticut, Connecticut
    LINK

    33. HOMER18 BUCKINGHAM (GILBERT17, ABEL16, SARAH15SMITH,
    J
    OSEPH14, SARAH13FOWLER, WILLIAM12, WILLIAM11, JOHN10,
    W
    ILLIAM9, THOMAS8, ROGER7, WILLIAM6, WILLIAM5, HENRY4, JOHN3,
    J
    OHN2, JOHN1LE FOWLER) was born 29 November 1828 in
    Northville, Litchfield, Connecticut, and died 17 October 1907 in New Milford,
    Litchfield, Connecticut. He married ADELINE COUCH 11 November 1850
    in New Milford, Litchfield, Connecticut.

    Notes
    Buried in Northville Cemetery, New Milford, Litchfield County, Connecticut


           Children of Homer Buckingham and Adeline Couch are:



    i. NUANIA19 BUCKINGHAM, b. Abt 186141.
    ii. LOTTIE BUCKINGHAM, b. Abt 186442.

    34. JOSIAH NORTHROP18 BUCKINGHAM (DANIEL17, DANIEL16,
    D
    ANIEL15, DANIEL14, HANNAH13FOWLER, WILLIAM12, WILLIAM11,
    J
    OHN10, WILLIAM9, THOMAS8, ROGER7, WILLIAM6, WILLIAM5, HENRY4,
    J
    OHN3, JOHN2, JOHN1LE FOWLER) was born 26 July 1805. He married
    MINERVA FORD 1825.

    http://www.genealogy.com/users/b/u/c/David-A-Buckingham/GENE4-0018.html

    la 1707 two persons came into New Milford.

    In 1712 there were here 12 families or between 60 and
    70 persons. A census, taken in 1756, reports 1137 in the
    town ; another taken in 1774, reported 2776, while in
    1800, after pans of the town had been ceded to Brookfleld
    and Washington, the population was 3198. The census of
    of 1870, gives the population of the present New Milford,
    as 3588, while Bridgev/ater, formerly a part of this town,
    has 877 inhabitants.

    greens annual register

     

    Much of this line is pretty well documented. However, Amos has been the brick wall preventing a connection to the earliest Northrop/ups. ,

    In the published Northrup/ Northrop genealogy, neither Amos Northrop/up's nor Rachel Ives' parents are documented. I believe I've tracked down Rachel, but Amos is still a mystery. Regardless of the location or spelling almost all of these Northrops are descended from Joseph Northrup of Milford, CT. Here are a few facts, speculations and clues to help pin them down..What we know about Amos Northrop/Northrup
    Amos was probably born in Eastern New York or the Western half of Connecticut -- an area with many Northrops. He spent a most of his life in Kent and adjoining Warren & Washington, CT. There is no mention of his early life or profession.

    ???

    http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hume/tree/19201.htm

    Baldwin, Enos 81

    • Marriage: Northrup, Elizabeth 81

    bullet   Another name for Enos was Amos.81

    Enos married Elizabeth Northrup, daughter of Phineas Northrup and Elizabeth Brinsmade.81 (Elizabeth Northrup was born on 17 Jan 1732/33 in Milford, New Haven Co, CT 81.)

     

     

    The death record of Washington CT has his birth as Kent and occupation Laborer. There is a conflict in his age at death 69 in Washington, but by the time he was buried in Warren Cemetery he was ten years older! age 79.

    Thanks to the Town Clerks office at Washington!

    I was able to confirm Amos Death and burial with the Warren Town Clerk's Office (Thanks for your wonderful assistance!).

    "I found a listing in a notebook refering to a sexton's book that lists his burial on May 18, 1855, age 79.  That is all the information listed in the book." This gives Amos a birthdate of around 1776 !! a new date in all the research.

    The sextons book is by F. B. Taylor, Warren and refers to burials from 1847-1869.  I believe he was the Sexton or Clerk for the Warren Congregational Church.

    'The Church of Christ was established in May 1750 as, "The East Greenwich Society of Kent" by division of "The First Society." Since then the church has been known as "The Congregational Society of Warren", "The First Ecclesiastical Society of Warren", The First Congregational Church of Warren", and in 1941, when the Society and the Church incorporated, it became known as "The Warren Congregational Church, Incorporated." In the National Historic Register, the Church is known as "The Warren Congregational Church." Records include baptism and marriage records.'

    The Washington Town clerk also provided this transcription (made in 1915?) of Northrops in Washington.

    (Rev. Daniel Brinsmade was of Judea Parish, Rev. Hart Talcott ordained 1817 of Warren)

    The Northrop name does not appear in any of the original divisions of Kent.The earliest Northrop I find in Thomas Grant Northrop son of Amos who went to Yale.

    [His brother, 27. Amos, b. Oct. 11, 1772. appears to have life his entire life in New Milford. m. Hannah ELDERKIN. Thomas' uncle, David (22. David, b. July 27, 1746. .) was married to Rachel Grant sister to Anne, wife of Amos Northrop 3d but all children were born in NewMilford.]

    No record of Northrops as members of the church in Kent although several neighbors appear. Atwater History of Kent Perhaps they were associated with another Parish -- especially if they were closer to an adjacent parish or had a family connection to another parish.

    Perhaps the Northrops stayed in the same area from the earliest census. I thought perhaps it was the Woodville section from names on some of the maps (NE of Washington by Mt. Tom), but perhaps they were in the corner where Kent, Warren and Washington meet.

    1859 Hopkins Map Litchfield County

    Kent Warren
      Washington

    Woodville Section of Washington by Mount Tom
    Warren Litchfield
      Washington

    West of Litchfield. Warren, formerly a part of Kent, was settled about 1737. The parish of East Greenwich was organized in 1750. In 1786, a town was incorporated and named for a Massachusetts man, Gen. Joseph Warren, the Revolutionary hero, who lost his life at Bunker Hill. The town consists of a high plateau, bordered on the south by Lake Waramaug.

    Lake Waramaug

    New Preston, Connecticut. From the top of the "hill" that's just southeast of Lake Waramaug called The Pinnacle.

    above from http://www.flickr.com/photos/richardspics/718893025/in/pool-24554386@N00

    THE tract now comprising the towns of Kent and Warren was sold at auction at the court house in Windham, in March, 1738. The settlernent commenced the same year.The principal settlers were from Colchester, Fairfield and Norwalk The first minister was the Rev. Cyrus Marsh, ordained in May, 1741.

    Kent

    the Moravian church or mission house was standing 30 or 40 years since, near the house of Mr. Raymond, by the Episcopal church. The Moravians left this place about half a century since. The Scatacook tribe, for whose benefit this mission was established, occupied the interval on the west side of the river for about three miles.

    It may be that this earlier mission set the stage for the Mission School in nearby Cornwall.

    Warren

    The agricultural productions are grass and some grain. Butter and cheese are made, and beef and pork raised by the inhabitants. The town is watered by the Shepaug, a branch of the Housatonic. Raumaug pond, a considerable body of water, is situated partly in this town, and partly in Washington. The population of the town in 1810 was 1,096; in 1830 it was reduced to 986.

    John Warner Barbor print of Litchfield, Connecticut, 1836. Courtesy of the Litchfield Historical Society.

    search yielded raymonds and olmsteads with many northrop connections


    The Amos Issues

    "1 AMOS NORTHROP, b. Jan. 8, 1778, probably at Chatham, N. Y ?? most of children's census records say NY-- between 1774-1800 but may not have been LIVING in NY. Amos' 1850 Census record says CT . Lived also at Warren and Kent, Conn. D. May 16,1855, Warren, Conn. (have not found any record of his death or marker) M. Rachel Ives (b. March 15,1775).had at least two wives married Susan Chaugham/Chaugum (Lighthouse tribe Molly Barber descendant) Kent, CT Oct. 26, 1829.
    Census support Amos in Kent and Warren. see Census Summary Below

    i Alvin, b. Apr. 15, 1803, Chatham, N. Y BORN NY don’t know where and don't know if family was LIVING there OR
    Kent, CT
    . 3 ii Gerrit, b. Aug. 9, 1812, Most/all of the Census listings say born CT Chatham, N. Y. "

    2 ALVIN NORTHROP (Amos),[need Record of Death from Westport] b. Apr. 15, 1803, ? Chatham, N. Y. ; shoemaker at Kent, Conn. ; m. at Kent, July 2, 1826, Sarah Wakeman Alvord (b. May 25, 1809, Kent; d. June 2, 1886, Southport, Conn.), dau. of Daniel (probably David) and Abigail (Wakeman) Alvord /or / David and Abigail Jennings. David is born in Fairfield. They are married in Fairfield 1800 and move to Kent by 1802. Why did they move to Kent? Their children are born in Kent and David dies in Kent 1831. Sarah and Alvin moved to Westport after the death of Sarah's father and lived for a time next to her mother and sister in Westport. Most of her family was in the Westport area. Alvin d. Nov. 29, 1875, Westport, Conn. Northrop name is on a Westport map dated 1867.
    i Julia Burr (sarah's grandmother was Eunice Burr), b. Nov. 28, 1832, Kent, Conn. ; m. Feb. 1, 1854, Charles Bulkley ; d. ??. perhaps Charles Seymour Bulkley ("a successful engineer") mentioned on page 816 of Jacobus (1933) and a descendant of the Rev. Peter Bulkeley in the Gershom, Peter line
    ii Francis, b. June 4, 1835, Kent ; d. July 9, 1837. (Age 2)
    4 iii William Fenn, (where did name Fenn come from?) b. Nov. 6, 1836, Kent
    IV Frances Josephine b. Aug 20, 1838, Kent m. at Rye, N. Y., Dec. 13, 1854, Charles Meeker; > Charles A b 1832? d. March 18, 1876, Westport, Conn.
    6 v George Elmore, (where did name Elmore come from?) b. Feb. 17, 1844, Cornwall, Conn.
    vi Louisa Azonetta, b. Apr. 12, 1850, Westport; m. March 2, 1871, at Westport. Geroge B. MILLS b: Abt 1845 in Westport,CT
    3 GERRIT NORTHROP (Amos), b. Aug. 9, 1812, Chatham? , N. Y. Census listings say CT; m. Feb. 11, 1834, Betsey (Elizabeth) Millard probably daughter of Joel Millard (son of Joshua ancestors from Mass) b. Cornwall, CT and Tabitha GREEN Milford or New Milford (Sarah Wakeman Alvord Northrop's brother Nelson marries Caroline (1829 Kent) Chamberlain then Adelia Millard in Torrington 1858 Nathan Skiff in Cornwall was probably Adelia's first marriage (d. May 8, 1868).
    He d. March 14, 1875, New Haven, Conn.
    6 i James Edward, b. Jan. 26, 1839, Warren, Conn.
    ii Charles Alvin, b. July 6, 1886. Five years in Civil War ; Second Lieutenant. Sailed, about 1880, as steward, on a voyage to Africa ; not heard from since. Supposed to have been lost at sea. Neglected to give name of vessel he sailed on.
    iii Eliza Ann, b. Dec. 7, 1847 ; m. William Hall, and living at Milton, Litchfield Co., Conn. ; 2 children.
    4 WILLIAM FENN NORTHROP (Alvin, Amos), (name may be from Hannah Ives Fenn prob sister of Rachel) b. Nov. 6, 1836, Kent, Conn. Carpenter and builder, and dealer in lumber, coal, etc., firm of "Northrop Brothers," at Southport, Conn. M. Dec. 23, 1857, at Mamerneck, N. Y., Abbie Jane, dau. of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Jane Baker, who are now dead, but formerly lived at Greens Farms, Conn.
    i Ella Angelina, b. Nov. 4, 1858 ; d. Sept. 8, 1864.
    ii Frederick Elmer, b. Sept. 2, 1871, Southport.
    6 GEORGE ELMORE NORTHROP (Alvin, Amos), b.' Feb. 17, 1844, Cornwall, Conn. Served through the Civil War, in Company A, 8th Connecticut Volunteers. M. at ________________, N. Y., Margaret Harrigan.
    i George Ives, b. July 15, 1871.
    ii Winthrop Blaine, b. Dec. 1, 1884. .

    JAMES EDWARD NORTHROP (Gerrit, Amos)
    b. January 26, 1839 Warren, CT Merchant residing at New Haven, Conn. m. Nov 24, 1864 Sarah Secelia Burnes, dau of James and Elizabeth ( Norton) Burnes of New Haven
    i Lillie E b. Aug 6, 1865 m. June 3, 1885 Oscar D. Beach of Milton CT
    ii Mary Elizabeth b. Sept 17, 18 70, d. Nov 5, 1870.

    The only hard facts - the A Judd Northrup genealogy:

    • The genealogy has some known errors and omissions especially with some of the families on the CT/NY border. Some family lines have been merged and some dates inaccurate. Connection of Amos Alvin and Gerrit is supported, Rachel as wife highly probable. Questions or possible errors: location of Alvin's 's birth. supported as NY but not (yet?) supported as Chatham; year of Amos birth may be 1780 (census) rather than 1778; location of Gerrit's birth CT not NY (census), Rachel's birth year may be 1780 rather than 1775.

    ...and the census listings for Amos and descendants (details below):

    • The census listings have errors in spelling and may reflect omissions or other errors as well.
    • It is quite possible that Amos and/or his parents moved from Milford, Ridgefield / South Salem, Fairfield / Wilton / Redding to Kent. We know his son, Alvin, moved closer to the coast when he and Sarah Wakeman Alvord Northrop changed their residence to Westport.We don't know if this was a return to known Northrop family connections. It appears to be a return to family connections for Sarah Wakeman Alvord.

    The Amos Questions:

    • Who were Amos' parents?
    • Where was Amos born?
    • Was Amos in Kent area before he married Rachel?
    • Where was Amos from birth to 1800?
    • Where was Amos and family in 1810 census?
    • Who is the extra female in the 1820 census?
    • Did Amos have a second or third marriage? Susan Chaugum? Sarah Osborn?
    • Was Amos' family,like the David Alvord Family from the Fairfield Redding area?

    While there are, so far, no traceable connections, there are interesting correlations with:

    Betts and Jelliff families -- possibly through Lewis Northrop/up.

    • William was in the carpentry business with Francis Jelliff (Southport, CT) and Betts and Northrop ran a carpentry business in Georgetown (Redding / Weston line). Betts and Jelliff families are related. see Jelliff page. There are marriages between Northrops and Betts (Ridgefield Norwalk area).
    • The same collection of names appears together in Ridgefield, Kent area and Lanesboro, MA

    Some kind of Elmore connection --

    Some kind of source for William, George and Francis Names in family or friends

    Some kind of source for Fenn middle name for William

    Some means to meet Ives family and Rachel of Wallingford/Cheshire

    • Lived Close to Wallingford? New Haven, Durham, Woodbridge, Woodbury
    • The Ives had connections in New Haven, Wallingford, Cheshire, and later Cornwall and Barkhamsted CT area; no connections in the upper Hudson area of NY near Chatham and no very early connections to Fairfield.
    • Religious or other connection?

    Northrop, Ives and Alvord connections may all be in one location

    • Plymouth is a location where Ives some Northrops and Alvords were in the same location. Many in Thomaston, Watertown, Waterbury, Litchfield as well.
    • Their co-location may be due to growing manufacturing concerns. Torrington, Hitchcocksville and Plymouth.erea cradles of innovation and industry from about 1790 to 1850. Industries include Chair making , Carriage making and clock making..

    Family Naming conventions don't seem consistent

    • Male First name sometimes from GGF First Name
    • Male Middle from Father's Father's Mother's maiden name
    • later generations Eldest male gets mother's maiden as middle, eldest female gets father's mother's maiden name.

    Connecticut map identified as 1766

    Note how large some of the townships/parishes are -- before some were divided.

    Top Picks for Connections to Amos
    Rebecca Northrup(w/o Amos Smith) (RIDGEFIELD)(d/o John (Joseph, William) b. 1703 New Haven died RIDGEFIELD buried Lithgow, NY)
    Some connection to : James NORTHRUP b: 9 Nov 1719 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, Connecticut
    and Rachel SMITH b: 27 Mar 1723 in Ridgefield, Fairfield, Connecticut
     
    BRIEF TIME LINE SUMMARY- CENSUS INFORMATION
    Location Birth 1779-80 On.
    LINK TO COMPREHENSIVE TIMELINE
    Event Amos Locations Age Year
    Census
    Age
    Amos
    Birth
    Year
    Con -firmed
    ?
    Born Chatham area NY, South Salem area NY?, Ridgefield?, Milford?, New Milford?, Woodbury?, Woodbridge?, New Haven? Chatham CT? ~ 0 ~1778 to 1780
    --
    --
    No
    Grew Up ?    
    --
    --
    No
    Childhood Warren?? no northrops ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Kent ?? no northrops ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Cornwall ?? no northrops ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood

    Litchfield Northorp, Joseph --------- 3 over 16, 3 m under 16, 6 females, 0, 0, Page 63 is this salisbury joseph? what about Abner? may have Bradley connection
    May or may not be a son, but probably some connection

    ALVERD ELIHU    CTLITCHFIELD LITCHFIELD 1790
    looks to be in same part of Litchfield in 1790

    ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Woodbury Northrop, Enoch --------- 1, 0, 4, 0, 0, Page 78 NO ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Isaac Woodbridge 12400 one male 16 and up, 2 males under 16 [~1775-1790], 4 females perhaps 2 sons, 3 daughters? ~10-12 1790 -- -- Census
    Childhood Watertown Northrop, Gedion 2d
    1 3 5 0 0
    Northrop, Joel 2 1(not cyrus he is 17) 1 0 0 maybe
    Northrop, Jonathan 2 1 4 0 0
    Northrop, Joseph 1 0 0 0 0 NO
    ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Harwinton ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Bethlehem ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Childhood Washington, CT Amos 1 2 2 0 0 and Elijah 1 2 2 0 0 ~10-12 1790
    --
    --
    Census
    Married Before 1800 female in census Wallingford ? Cheshire? Mother Sarah Butler Ives 1790 1800 ~20 ~1800
    --
    --
    No
    Spouse Rachel Ives very likely ~ 20 ~ 1800
    --
    --
    No
    Residence Kent, CT ~ 20 - 22 1800
    16 - 26
    1774-1785
    Census
    Residence Kent Thomas Grant 001 m 16-25 1 m 26-45 0 00000 between Comstock & Pratt Thomas ~ 29 in 1800. Who is male age 16-25?? no kids by aurelia til 1805. Amos Wilkes about 27?   1800     Census
    Residence ?? New Milford 20010/20010 or Maybe Mass or Vermont? or living with someone else ~ 30 1810
    26 - 35
    1775-1784
    Census
    Residence ??ENOS NORTHRUP   Litchfield, Cornwall       1810      
    Residence Kent, CT Kent 1 m under 10/ 1 m 18-26 1 f 26-45
    1 female over 45 *
    WHO IS THE FEMALE?
    or Rachel could be just 45 and the female 26-45??
    ~ 40-42 1820
    26 - 45
    1775- 1794
    Census
    Residence Kent, CT Kent 1 m. 40-50, 1 f 10-20 stepdau?, 1 f 50-60 Susan prob not might older than Amos maybe younger ~ 50 - 52 1830
    40 - 50
    1780-1790
    Census
    Residence Warren, CT Warren with Gerry? no sign of GN wife or child ~ 60 - 62 1840
    60 - 70
    1770-1780
    Census
      Drake, son of Enos in Cornwall 1 m 70-80 1 female 70-80 -- 1840
    --
    --
    --
    Residence Washington, CT with Gerry no sign
    of his wife or child
    ~ 70 -72 1850
    72
    1778
    Census
    Residence Amos Kent pauper (wrong age) ~ 70 -72 1850
    78
    1772
    --
      Lyman and Wells Northrop (son of Cyrus g-son of Joel and Eunice
    Marsh) Kent
    -- 1850 -- -- --
    Death Warren, CT May 16,1855 AJ Northrup book ~ 77 1855
    --
    --
    No
    Residence After Washington, CT Only Gerry and
    family no Amos
    ~ 80 1860
    --
    --
    Census
    Buried ? Warren?/Washington? -- 1855
    --
    --
    No

    The "family sticks together" speculation

    In the absence of more definitive information, I've reviewed possible neighbors in the census (where available). In census lists that are not alphabetical, I speculate name sequence reflects physical order of homes. Below are the names I watched for in the review.

    The table lists the results as likely extended family connections. I speculate the earlier data is more likely to be significant. The years are links to images of the census pages.

    Census neighbor names
    Tibblas Nettleton